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Truste Honors Aol As Top Internet Service Provider


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Before I post the Article, let me tell you of my Experience on aol. I remember being "I.M. Bombed", I remember being hacked, I remember getting Viruses,I remember kids actively trying to pick up adults in the chats,I remember being abused beyond discription on aol.

 

What USE to make aol as one of the best ISP's out there was it's ease of use, as well as it's chats. ( That's the truth)

 

Aol is still easy to use, and THAT"s ABOUT IT. If anyone working in AOL reads this?

 

You have a VERY LONG WAY TO GO BEFORE PEOPLE TRUST YOU ,EVER AGAIN.

 

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http://www.hostreview.com/news/news/050117TRUSTe.html

 

 

TRUSTe Honors AOL as Top Internet Service Provider

 

 

HostReview.com

Monday, January 17, 2005; 03:39 PM

 

 

 

TRUSTe (www.truste.org), an online privacy nonprofit organization and Ponemon Institute, today announced that America Online, Inc., the world's leading interactive services company, was the top Internet Service Provider (ISP) in its' rankings for the Most Trusted Company for Privacy.

 

America Online finished third in the overall rankings behind top company HP and runner-up eBay for the establishment and enforcement of progressive privacy practices.

 

"America Online finished in the top three companies for privacy and particularly distinguished itself in the areas of user control and choice," said Fran Maier, president and executive director of TRUSTe.

 

"Studies conducted by Ponemon Institute over the past three years consistently show AOL as one of the most respected companies for privacy and trust," said Dr. Larry Ponemon, Chairman of the Ponemon Institute.

 

"Our relationship with our members is based on respect for their privacy and an unwavering commitment to protect them from the threats of the online world," said Tatiana Platt, AOL Senior Vice President and Chief Trust Officer.

 

The 50 companies which topped the list in a consumer-focused study released in June by the Ponemon Institute and TRUSTe were invited to participate in the award program. In that survey, the public determined eBay, American Express and HP (in order) as the leading companies in trust and privacy protection.

 

TRUSTe is an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to enabling individuals and organizations to establish trusting relationships based on respect for personal identity and information in the evolving networked world.

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A federal judge refused to accept a guilty plea from a former America Online software engineer accused of stealing 92 million e-mail addresses and selling them to spammers.

 

Judge Alvin Hellerstein of Manhattan federal court said he was not convinced Jason Smathers, 24, had actually committed a crime under new federal “can-spam” legislation that took effect earlier this year.

 

Smathers, of Harpers Ferry, W.Va., planned to enter guilty pleas to charges of conspiracy and interstate transportation of stolen property. But the judge turned him away and scheduled another hearing for January.

 

Under a plea deal worked out with federal prosecutors, Smathers faced a potential prison term of 18 months to two years, plus fines.

 

The judge, who said he dropped his own AOL membership because he received too much spam, said it was not clear that Smathers had deceived anyone — a requirement of the new law.

 

Federal prosecutor David Siegal urged the judge to accept Smathers’ guilty plea, saying “billions and billions of unsolicited e-mails” had been sent to “people like Your Honor” because of Smathers’ conduct.

 

“Everybody hates spamsters, there’s no question about that,” Hellerstein said. But he added: “I’m not prepared to go ahead, Mr. Siegal. I need to be independently satisfied that a crime has been created.”

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At least the judge had a good sense in leaving aol. In any case as to the "can spam act" the act is way too broad. AS I have said before, it still comes down to the "Internet decency Act of 1995" that created this problem to begin with (which aol supported whole heartedly).

 

I can guaranty you that if the later act is amended that you would see sweeping changes in how the internet conducts itself.

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