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To ALL Politicians, STOP your Games and PASS A BILL NOW.

 

Or suffer at Election Day. To my group "The Republicans", This Aint no game and suck it up....................................

 

To the Democrats; DON'T EVEN THINK OF PLAYING WITH IT ANYMORE.

Edited by Human
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I know that there is alot of wrong in this BILL, and we all know that the democrats were behind this disaster, BUT RIGHT NOW "THE GOOD OF THE COUNTRY TRUMPS POLITICS".

 

When I back off from what I can post about Latin America, the only bleeping reason I back off IS BECAUSE OF WHAT IS IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE UNITED STATES..............................

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You are way off on this ONE. REPUBLICANS your taxes or the federal deficit will skyrocket! Don't fall for Socialist tactics.

 

Sign Senator Bernie Sanders letter now.

 

http://sanders.senate.gov/petitions/?petit...ancial_Crisis_1

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How is this one sided? Republicans deserted a Republican bill submitted by a Republican White House. I honestly believe that President Bush has had 7 years and 9 months to fix our country. He is going to walk away from this Scott free. I would agree that Democrat Speaker Pelosi should not have put this bill up for a vote if she was not sure it would pass.

Edited by Luke_Wilbur
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Because Nancy Pelosi Opened up her mouth when SHE SHOULD NOT HAVE. She poisoned the bill "Out Right".

 

Even I was for the BILL, and I didn't like it at all. When Bush comes out on T.V. and tells the American people that this IS SERIOUS, He AINT KIDDIN..........................................

 

Bush keeps alot to the vest. To the General Public; You should have gotten that hint REAL FAST.

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How is this one sided? Republicans deserted a Republican bill submitted by a Republican White House. I honestly believe that President Bush has had 7 years and 9 months to fix our country. He is going to walk away from this Scott free. I would agree that Democrat Speaker Pelosi should not have put this bill up for a vote if she was not sure it would pass.
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AND ONE LAST THING; Read this like you have NEVER READ ANYTHING ELSE IN YOUR LIVES;

 

When you have 25 to 30 year olds making legislation who have no bleeping clue in life as to what life is; You get exactly what you are getting now.............................................................................

....

 

DO ALL OF YOU UNDERSTAND CRYSTAL CLEAR? Hummm!!

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Here is a transcript of Speaker Pelosi’s speech:

 

$700 billion. A staggering number. But only a part of the cost of the failed Bush economic policies to our country. Policies that were built on budget recklessness. When President Bush took office, he inherited President Clinton’s surpluses — four years in a row, budget surpluses, on a trajectory of $5.6 trillion in surplus. And with his reckless economic policies, within two years, he had turned that around.

 

And now eight years later, the foundation of that fiscal irresponsibility, combined with an anything goes economic policy, has taken us to where we are today. They claim to be free market advocates, when it’s really an anything goes mentality. No regulation, no supervision, no discipline. And if you fail, you will have a golden parachute, and the taxpayer will bail you out.

 

Those days are over. The party is over in that respect. Democrats believe in a free market. We know that it can create jobs, it can create wealth, it can create many good things in our economy. But in this case, in its unbridled form, as encouraged, supported, by the Republicans — some in the Republican Party, not all — it has created not jobs, not capital, it has created chaos.

 

And it is that chaos that the secretary of the Treasury and the chairman of the Fed came to see us just about a week and a half ago — seems like an eternity, doesn’t it, so much has happened, the news was so bad. They described a very, very dismal situation. A dismal situation describing the state of our economy, the fragility of our financial institutions and the instability of our markets, our equity markets, our credit markets, our bond market.

 

And here we were listening to people who knew of what they spoke. Secretary of the Treasury brings long credentials and knowledge of the markets. More fearful, though, to me, more scary, was the statement — were the statements of Chairman Bernanke [ben S. Bernanke, chairman of the Federal Reserve], because Chairman Bernanke is probably one of the foremost authorities in America on the subject of the Great Depression. I don’t know what was so great about the Depression, but that’s the name they give it. And we heard the secretary and the chairman tell us that this was a once in a hundred year phenomenon, this fiscal crisis was so drastic. Certainly once in 50 years, probably once in a hundred years.

 

And how did it sneak up on us? So silently, almost on little cat feet. That they would come in on that day — and they didn’t actually ask for the money, that much money that night. It took two days until we saw the legislation that they were proposing to help calm the markets. And it was on that day that we learned of a $700 billion request.

 

But it wasn’t just the money that was alarming. It was the nature of the legislation. It gave the secretary of the Treasury czar-like powers, unlimited powers, latitude to do all kinds of things and specifically prohibited judicial review or review of any other federal administrative agency to review their actions.

 

Another aspect of it that was alarming is it gave the secretary the power to use any money that came back from these infusions of cash to be used at the discretion of the secretary. Not to reduce the deficit, not to go into the general funds so that we could afford other priorities. To be used at the discretion of the secretary. It was shocking. Working together in a bipartisan way, we were able to make major improvements on that proposal, even though its fundamental basis was almost arrogant and insulting.

 

The American people responded almost immediately. Overwhelmingly, they said they know that something needs to be done. Say 78 percent of the American people said Congress must act. Fifty-eight-some percent said, but not to accept the Bush proposal. And so here we are today, a week later and a couple of days later, coming to the floor with a product — not a bill that I would have written, one that has major disappointments with me, beginning with the fact that it does not have bankruptcy in this bill — and we will continue to persist and work to achieve that.

 

It’s interesting, though, to me that when they describe this, the magnitude of the challenge and the precipice that we were on and how we had to act quickly and we had to act boldly and we had to act now, that it never occurred to them that the consequences of this market were being felt well in advance by the American people. And unemployment is up, and therefore we need unemployment insurance. That jobs are lacking, and therefore we need a stimulus package. So how can on the one hand could this be so urgent at the moment, and yet so unnecessary for us to address the effects of this poor economy in the households of America across our country?

 

We’ll come back to that in a moment. Working together, we put together some standards — and I am really proud of what Barney Frank did in this regard. The first night, that night, that Thursday night, when we got the very, very dismal news, he immediately said, if we’re going to do this — and Spencer Bachus was a part of this as well — in terms of if we’re going to do this, we must have equity for the American people. We’re putting up $700 billion, we want the American people to get some of the upside. So equity, fairness for the American people.

 

Secondly, if they were describing the root of the problem as the mortgage-backed securities, Barney insisted that we would have forbearance on foreclosure. If we’re now going to own that paper, that we would then have forbearance to help responsible homeowners stay in their home.

 

In addition to that, we have to have strong, strong oversight. We didn’t even have to see the $700 billion or the full extent of their bill to know that we needed equity and upside for the taxpayer, forbearance for the homeowner, oversight of the government on what they were doing, and something that the American people understand full well, an end to the golden parachutes and the — a — review and reform of the compensation for C.E.O.’s.

 

Let’s get this straight. We have a situation where on Wall Street people are flying high, they are making unconscionable amounts of money. They make a lot of money, they privatize the gain, the minute things go tough, they nationalize the risk. They get a golden parachute as they drive their firm into the ground, and the American people have to pick up the tab. Something is very, very wrong with this picture.

 

So just on first blush, that Thursday night, we made it clear, meeting much resistance on the part of the administration, that those four things, equity, forbearance, oversight, and reform of compensation. Overriding all of this is a protection of the taxpayer. We need to stabilize the markets. In doing so, we need to protect the taxpayers.

 

And that’s why I’m so glad that this bill contains a suggestion made by Mr. Tanner [Representative John Tanner, Democrat of Tennessee] that if at the end of the day, say in five years, when we can take a review of the success or whatever of this initiative, that if there is a shortfall and we don’t get our whole $700 billion back that we have invested, that there will be an initiative to have the financial institutions that benefited from this program to make up that shortfall.

 

But not one penny of this should be carried by the American people. People asked, and Mr. Spratt [Representative John M. Spratt Jr., Democrat of South Carolina] spoke with great knowledge and eloquence on the budget and aspects of the budget. $700 billion, what is the impact, what is the opportunity cost for our country of the investments that we would want to make?

 

O.K., now we have it in place where the taxpayer is going to be made whole and that was very important for us. But why on the drop of a hat can they ask us for $700 billion, and we couldn’t get any support from the administration on a stimulus package that would also help grow the economy?

 

People tell me all over the world that the biggest emerging market, economic market in the world, is rebuilding the infrastructure of America. Roads, bridges, waterways, water systems in addition to waterways. The grid, broadband, schools, housing, certain schools. We are trillions of dollars in deficit there.

 

We know what we need to do to do it in a fiscally sound way, in a fiscally sound way that creates good-paying jobs in America immediately. Brings money into the treasury by doing so, and again does all of this in an all-American way. Good-paying jobs here in America.

 

We can’t get the time of day for 25, $35 billion for that, which we know guarantees jobs, et cetera, but $700 billion. So make no mistake, when this Congress adjourns today to observe Rosh Hashanah and have members go home for a bit, we are doing so at the call of the chair. Because this subject is not over, this discussion about how we save our economy.

 

And we must insulate Main Street from Wall Street. And as Congresswoman Waters [Representative Maxine Waters, Democrat of California] said, Martin Luther King Drive, in my district Martin Luther King Drive, and Cedar Chavez Road and all of the manifestations of community and small businesses in our community. We must insulate them from that. And so we have difficult choices, and so many of the things that were said on both sides of this issue in terms of its criticisms of the bill we have and the bill that we had at first, and the very size of this, I share. You want to go home, so I’m not going to list all of my concerns that I have with it.

 

But it just comes down to one simple thing. They have described a precipice. We are on the brink of doing something that might pull us back from that precipice. I think we have a responsibility. We have worked in a bipartisan way. I want to acknowledge Mr. Blunt and Mr. Boehner, the work that we have done together, trying to find as much common ground as possible on this.

 

But we insisted the taxpayer be covered. We all insisted that we have a party-is-over message to Wall Street. And we insisted that, that taxpayers at risk must recover — that any risk must be recovered. I told you that already. So, my colleagues, let’s recognize that this Congressional — this legislation is not the end of the line.

 

Mr. Waxman [Representative Henry A. Waxman, Democrat of California] will be having vigorous oversight this week, hearings this week on regulatory reform and other aspects of it. I hope you will pursue fraud and mismanagement and the rest. Mr. Frank and his committee will continue to pursue other avenues that we can stabilize the markets and protect the taxpayer. For too long, this government, in eight years, has followed a right-wing ideology of anything goes, no supervision, no discipline, no regulation.

 

Again, all of us are believers in free markets, but we have to do it right. Now, let me again acknowledge the extraordinary leadership of Mr. Frank. He has been an exceptional leader in the Congress, but never has his knowledge and his experience and his judgment been more needed than now. And I thank you, Mr. Frank, for your exceptional leadership, Mr. Chairman.

 

I also — so many people worked on this, but I also want to acknowledge the distinguished chair of our caucus, Mr. Emanuel. His knowledge of the markets, the respect he commands on those subjects, and his boundless energy on the subjects served us well in these negotiations. But this, this is a bipartisan initiative that we are bringing to the floor. We have to have a bipartisan vote on this. That is the only message that will send a message of confidence to the markets.

 

So I hope that — I know that we will be able to live up to our side of the bargain. I hope the Republicans will, too.

 

But my colleagues, as you go home and see your families and observe the holiday and the rest, don’t get settled in too far, because as long as the American — this challenge is there for the American people, the threat of losing their jobs, the credit, their credit, their jobs, their savings, their retirement, the opportunity for them to send their children to college.

 

As long as in the households of America, this crisis is being felt very immediately and being addressed at a different level, we must come back, and we will come back as soon and as often as it is necessary to make the change that is necessary. And before long we will have a new Congress, a new president of the United States, and we will be able to take our country in a new direction.

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Guest Rep. Robert Aderholt

The vote that I cast in opposition to the $700 Billion Bailout Plan is one of the most difficult votes I have cast since my time as representative of the 4th Congressional District of Alabama and definitely the most difficult vote during this 110th Congress.

 

However, it became increasingly clear over the past few days that this proposed bailout plan did not have the support of the American people. It is true that changes to the overall plan had been made before the vote, but still the American people did not support this proposal.

 

The Administration's proposal amounted to the largest corporate bailout in American history and it is one that I was not comfortable supporting. There are no easy answers to the current disarray in our economy but there are alternatives to massive government spending that we need to explore.

 

Now that this bailout legislation has failed, Congress must keep working to address this problem in a way that is acceptable to the American people. We can’t proceed with the same bill. Congress must put together a proposal that will not only work but will restore the trust of the American people.

 

The House of Representatives is the people’s House and the people’s House must have the confidence of the American people.

 

Many Americans have been worried about the statements that have been made about this issue. I want to encourage the people of Alabama and elsewhere to not react too quickly on reports that our economy may be heading towards serious decline. It’s important for us to strategically and methodically think through these challenges by taking the appropriate time to craft a substantive solution.

 

As a conservative, I have a serious problem when the government intervenes too much in our economy. Congress should act, but it should act in a way that protects the integrity of our free market and protect the American taxpayer from more debt and higher taxes. And when Congress acts, I believe that policymakers must act decisively, and most importantly, correctly.

 

I have cosponsored a bill that provides responsible alternatives to the $700 Billion Economic Plan. The “Free-Market Protection Act of 2008” is a bill that intends to help Wall Street “workout” of this crisis, rather than force the taxpayers into a “bailout”.

 

This bill uses voluntary private capital, not taxpayer capital, which will help the system recover properly. This alternative bill also focuses on reforming a failure in government institutions and corporate accountability.

 

Congress must not embrace a cure that may do more harm than good to the financial market.

 

In my opinion, Congress should go back to the drawing board to debate a plan that doesn’t bailout the financial industry, but helps the problems facing the financial market while protecting hard-working Americans.

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Guest Congressman John Shadegg (R-AZ)

Madam Speaker, I rise to say that this bill is tragically flawed. It contains no increase in FDIC insurance, which would make people comfortable and safe when they’re rushing to their banks right now. It contains no capital gains tax, no tax changes, no attempt to deal systemically with the problem. Most importantly, it contains no change in the mark-to-market rules.

 

This morning, a banker of mine called me from Arizona. He said, “Mark-to-market is destroying the capital in the market, and is dragging down the value of these markets.” He explained that bank examiners are not even enforcing their own rule. Their own rule says an asset shouldn’t be marked down until, one, its value drops and, two, until the people stop making payments, but bank examiners are now saying that they must call it mark to market and destroy its value even if the owner of the property is still making those payments.

 

We have asked over and over again for FDIC insurance to be increased and for a change in the mark-to-market rules. Again and again and again, those requests have been rejected.

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Guest Congressman Flake

Given the House’s failure to pass this bailout, Congress needs to come back and pass legislation that will stabilize the markets by increasing liquidity and making meaningful reforms in the financial services sector,” said Flake. “House Republicans have a proposal to do that.

 

The House Republican proposal includes privately funded mortgage insurance with risk-based premiums to provide relief to the financial services sector without making taxpayers liable. To create liquidity in the market, the House Republican plan includes a voluntary suspension on dividend payments and a repatriation window for profits earned by U.S. companies overseas. The House Republican proposal also includes meaningful reforms of the financial services sector, like limits on federal backing for high-risk loans and credit rating agency reform.”

 

House Republicans have an alternative proposal; Congress needs to come back and act on it immediately.

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Guest Congressman Doug Lamborn

This vote is a victory for the taxpayers. Because I do not support a government bailout of private institutions, I voted against this bill. It is an invasion of the free market, which I believe is the best way to sustain prosperity for our country.

 

I agree that something should be done to restore confidence in our markets. That is why I support alternative legislation by the Republican Study Committee that will allow Congress to help Wall Street ’workout’ this crisis in a way that does not force the taxpayers to ’bailout’ Wall Street. I believe that voluntary private capital, not involuntary taxpayer capital, will best help our financial markets recover.

 

Our free market system is the greatest engine for prosperity the world has ever known.

 

I believe our economy will come back, stronger and better even when it hits obstacles. The key is to allow the markets to work themselves out, not be bailed out.”-- Congressman Doug Lamborn (C0-05)

 

Congressman Lamborn co-sponsored H.R. 7223, an alternative bill aimed at stabilizing the economy through free market principles.

 

Highlights of that bill include:

 

- Use privately-funded mortgage insurance to stabilize the market and eliminate taxes on profits earned by U.S. firms overseas, so they will not have incentives to move job overseas

 

- Schedule Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for privatization

 

- Suspend mark-to-market regulatory rules until the SEC can issue new guidelines that will allow firms to mark assets to their true economic value

 

- Allow banks to treat losses on GSE stock as ordinary losses, not capital losses

 

- Crack down on fraud

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Because Nancy Pelosi Opened up her mouth when SHE SHOULD NOT HAVE. She poisoned the bill "Out Right".

 

Even I was for the BILL, and I didn't like it at all. When Bush comes out on T.V. and tells the American people that this IS SERIOUS, He AINT KIDDIN..........................................

 

Bush keeps alot to the vest. To the General Public; You should have gotten that hint REAL FAST.

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AGREED. Republican Representative Adam Putnam of Florida, said a speech Speaker Pelosi gave ahead of the vote in which she blamed the Bush administration policies for the crisis – "set a partisan tone [and] cost us votes.'' About 33% of GOP representatives voted in favor of the bill.

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Guest A Friend of Dusty
AGREED. Republican Representative Adam Putnam of Florida, said a speech Speaker Pelosi gave ahead of the vote in which she blamed the Bush administration policies for the crisis – "set a partisan tone [and] cost us votes.'' About 33% of GOP representatives voted in favor of the bill.

 

Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA) ridiculed the blame game: "Because somebody hurt their feelings, they decide to punish the country." Frank added, "I'll make an offer. Give me those 12 people's names and I will go talk uncharacteristically nicely to them and tell them what wonderful people they are and maybe they’ll now think about the country."

 

Did this statement hurt? <_<

 

Republicans — some in the Republican Party, not all — it has created not jobs, not capital, it has created chaos.

 

Or was it this statement? :o

 

But it wasn’t just the money that was alarming. It was the nature of the legislation. It gave the secretary of the Treasury czar-like powers, unlimited powers, latitude to do all kinds of things and specifically prohibited judicial review or review of any other federal administrative agency to review their actions.

 

Maybe it was this statement that hurt their feelings. :wacko:

 

Secondly, if they were describing the root of the problem as the mortgage-backed securities, Barney insisted that we would have forbearance on foreclosure. If we’re now going to own that paper, that we would then have forbearance to help responsible homeowners stay in their home.

 

Oh. this must have really got your goat. :huh:

 

For too long, this government, in eight years, has followed a right-wing ideology of anything goes, no supervision, no discipline, no regulation.

 

Wait. I see the pinched nerve right here :angry:

 

I know that we will be able to live up to our side of the bargain. I hope the Republicans will, too.

 

 

 

The Republicans' prideful attitude cost this country tremendously. The Dow suffered its largest-ever point decline in reaction, down about 777 points, or 7%, while the S&P was off 8.75%, its worst decline since 1987. The Nasdaq lost over 9% as Google fell below $400 for the first time in two years and Apple tumbled 18% following analyst downgrades.

 

I can't wait until you cronies get kicked out this election.

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Don't believe their nonsense. The truth is the Republican house is imploding. Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) balked at the key rationale House Republican leaders have been employing this afternoon to explain why they couldn’t deliver more GOP votes for the Wall Street bailout package. "We are not babies who suck their thumbs," Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) said. Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) also thought the idea that Pelosi's speech changed votes "ridiculous."

 

I wonder what the real truth is to why the Republicans killed the Bill?

 

Maybe defecting Republicans believe in Congressman Hensarling's plan on removing capital gains taxes.

 

“We must consider alternatives that would suspend capital gains taxes immediately. We have a liquidity crisis and suspending capital gains taxes would bring as much as a trillion dollars of capital sitting on the sidelines back into the market. Second, we need to suspend the mark to market accounting that has created a credit crunch dust pile for so many businesses across America. When Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac crumpled – a problem that House Conservatives warned about for years – the whole system started to crumble with it. These troubled financial Frankensteins – created in a government laboratory – are not creatures of the free enterprise system and we must ultimately take their monopoly powers away and return them to the marketplace. Finally, the Federal Reserve is being pulled in too many directions and we should amend the Humphrey Hawkins Act which currently diverts the Federal Reserve’s attention from long-term price stability to short-term economic growth.”

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In a BILL like this one, The LAST THING IN THE WORLD you do is to inject politics in a BILL that DOES TAKE NATIONAL IMPORTANCE "Just right before the vote".

 

I've been in politics a long time Mister, and even I know better then to cut off a bill at its knees

With the Vote being so close.

 

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Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA) ridiculed the blame game: "Because somebody hurt their feelings, they decide to punish the country." Frank added, "I'll make an offer. Give me those 12 people's names and I will go talk uncharacteristically nicely to them and tell them what wonderful people they are and maybe they’ll now think about the country."

 

Did this statement hurt? <_<

Or was it this statement? :o

Maybe it was this statement that hurt their feelings. :wacko:

Oh. this must have really got your goat. :huh:

Wait. I see the pinched nerve right here :angry:

The Republicans' prideful attitude cost this country tremendously. The Dow suffered its largest-ever point decline in reaction, down about 777 points, or 7%, while the S&P was off 8.75%, its worst decline since 1987. The Nasdaq lost over 9% as Google fell below $400 for the first time in two years and Apple tumbled 18% following analyst downgrades.

 

I can't wait until you cronies get kicked out this election.

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I'm in FULL agreement there Luke. Because if We as A COUNTRY don't come together?

WE WILL BE LOOKING AT A DEPRESSION.

 

It is that Serious.

 

But a Word to the Wise out there; DON'T PLAY POLITICS WITH THIS "OUR NATION IS AT STAKE".

 

This goes out to Both Democrats, and Republicans. People ARE LOSING their PENSIONS Even as I type this out.

 

We NEED a BILL, and FAST.

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Can we all stop focusing on who did what and come up with solutions.
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Hey!!! Folks; We can work out the rest of the details later, and some are not going to be sweet for everyone.

 

Let me give you an example; Part of the package for the next congress will be illegal immigration reform "I'm not going to call it undocumented workers, or anything of that sort. I am being blunt about it".

 

Part of the next package whether we like it or not is going to include it. Plain, Pure, and Simple, we need the help of the workers who are now here illegally to be part of the system.

 

I AM A REPUBLICAN FOLKS. We can let this go till the next congress, but right now we NEED a Bill that Protects Consumers as well as the Market. PERIOD

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The Washington Post notes that "there was a widespread sense on Capitol Hill that Monday's vote had snapped the public to attention about the potential repercussions of Congress's failure to act." Whereas "last week, House and Senate offices were bombarded with calls from opponents who viewed the bill as a Wall Street boondoggle," the "pattern shifted sharply after Monday's vote, aides to lawmakers in both parties said." Bloomberg adds that "lawmakers received a flurry of calls demanding that they revive the U.S. economy after the House's rejection of a $700 billion financial-rescue plan triggered a record drop in stocks ... The calls countered an earlier outpouring of opposition to the legislation."

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...8093003176.html

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Hey!!!! the Democrats CONTROLL the Purse Strings on this one. As for me accounting is NOT my forte, but Information IS.

 

I've given my bank ALL the very best directories that I have. Now that may not sound like a whole lot, but when you consider that one person that I know was going into the financials, and I gave him the entire financials for brazil, and told him to keep it to himself "sadly it didn't work out that way".

 

He told everyone else about it just to look like a big shot. <One of these days' I'm going to learn not to be so nice.>

 

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The Washington Post notes that "there was a widespread sense on Capitol Hill that Monday's vote had snapped the public to attention about the potential repercussions of Congress's failure to act." Whereas "last week, House and Senate offices were bombarded with calls from opponents who viewed the bill as a Wall Street boondoggle," the "pattern shifted sharply after Monday's vote, aides to lawmakers in both parties said." Bloomberg adds that "lawmakers received a flurry of calls demanding that they revive the U.S. economy after the House's rejection of a $700 billion financial-rescue plan triggered a record drop in stocks ... The calls countered an earlier outpouring of opposition to the legislation."

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...8093003176.html

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  • 1 month later...
Guest Human_*

Just for the record;

When I gave them the info I have, I also gave them MY directory as well. There really is more than one way to advertise. :)

 

There more ways than this; But this thread is not about Advertising.

 

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Hey!!!! the Democrats CONTROLL the Purse Strings on this one. As for me accounting is NOT my forte, but Information IS.

 

I've given my bank ALL the very best directories that I have. Now that may not sound like a whole lot, but when you consider that one person that I know was going into the financials, and I gave him the entire financials for brazil, and told him to keep it to himself "sadly it didn't work out that way".

 

He told everyone else about it just to look like a big shot. <One of these days' I'm going to learn not to be so nice.>

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I truly hope all sides come together on our economy. It looks like McCain, Obama, and Lieberman have made amends with each other. We just need to put aside all drama and move on to stabilizing our economy.

 

Everyone is going to be looking for a handout. I think the ones we bail out should have major strings attached. Transparency for one thing.

 

I will put a link to your directory if you want. Just let me know.

Edited by Luke_Wilbur
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Guest human_*

Oh!!!!! And the credit crisis WILL be stabilized by MARCH. Remember it's the G20, and not the G8.

 

So there you going to have just a tad of a problem playing POLITICS with the economy there.

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Guest human_*

What I gave my bank was 5,000 pages thick, and on each page the information IS practical, and useful all the way towards all 52 states, and even down to the U.S. territories.

 

It's going to take them a while to filter through the information that is geared to their business model.

But the information is GEARED towards the U.S. Economic Base.

 

Because what Economic politics really is? Is Bringing home the Bacon.

 

Understood, I will let you know.

 

Oh!! and some thing I noticed of particular interest, when the democrats made the case for oil futures being so high; Everyone took off to the equities. <~ the latter part IS what the democrats were playing with.

 

I didn't understand it fully till I saw the democrats scrambling like there was no tomorrow after the president made that speech, plus I knew the democrats were heavily involved in the financials. The thing is, I didn't know how deep till after the presidents 1st speech.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I truly hope all sides come together on our economy. It looks like McCain, Obama, and Lieberman have made amends with each other. We just need to put aside all drama and move on to stabilizing our economy.

 

Everyone is going to be looking for a handout. I think the ones we bail out should have major strings attached. Transparency for one thing.

 

I will put a link to your directory if you want. Just let me know.

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