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Who Really Pushed for North Korean Test?


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This is worth the read.

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http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/htm...00610140003.asp

By Annie I. Bang

 

Who are driving North Korea's nuclear ambitions? Experts in Seoul point to three hawkish military generals whose influence has led the North's leader onto a dangerous path. They also mention two revered scientists who laid the groundwork for nuclear technology in the North.

 

As the world ponders over North Korea's alleged first-ever nuclear test on Monday, experts in Seoul say the North's leader Kim Jong-il might have received pressure from his close generals to go ahead with the test.

The generals are Park Jae-kyung, Hyun Chul-hee and Lee Myong-su. They belong to the North Korean People's Army and often appear in the North Korean media standing next to Kim.

 

"It is very likely that the three and other military hard-liners set the stage for enforcing the nuclear bomb test, and then Kim Jong-il ratified the procedure," said Nam Sung-wook, a North Korean studies professor at Korea University.

 

"Park and Hyun have insisted that North Korea must possess nuclear weapons in order to uphold its social and military structures," Nam said.

As North Korea engages in its military-first policy, observers say its military strength is now stronger than ever.

 

North Korea's bomb was made possible by noted scientists such as the late Do Sang-rok, who defected from South Korea to the North in 1946.

 

"The first-class treatment received by professor Do from Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il tells us that they held a strong interest in developing nuclear weapons," a government source said.

Do was born in 1903 in North Korea and died in 1990 after publishing several research papers on nuclear matters and nuclear energy.

 

He had taught at Seoul National University before Korea declared its independency from Japanese colonization in 1945. He then left for Pyongyang and taught at the North's top Kim Il-sung University.

Do was beloved by the North Korean regime's founder Kim Il-sung and his son Jong-il. He received numerous awards, including the Kim Il Sung Award in 1973 for his contribution in nuclear development.

Aside from Do, there is another renowned scientist - Seo Sang-guk, a physics professor at Kim Il-sung University.

 

Born in 1938, Seo has played a leading role in the development of nuclear bombs and taught at Kim Il-sung University after studying abroad in Russia in the 1960s.

 

When Kim Jong-il celebrated his 60th birthday in 1998, North Korean media reported that he had sent a prize to Seo for his contribution to the nation's development in the field of science.

It is reported that Seo is also a secret member of the North's defense committee and deals with its nuclear plans and policies.

 

With the North's hard-line position becoming stronger, experts say it has become more difficult to deal with its nuclear ambitions.

 

Selig Harrison, director of the Asia Program at the Center for International Policy, who recently visited Pyongyang, said the financial sanctions against North Korea have made the nuclear issue more complicated.

In May, North Korea abruptly canceled a test-run for the inter-Korean railways, citing military security concerns.

 

And the Seoul government explained the North's military authorities have never been happy with implementing inter-Korean agreements.

The North's hard-liners have also been opposed to the inter-Korean businesses in the North's border city of Gaeseong and at Mount Geumgang, saying the North has nothing to benefit from them.

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Okay just for fun "since it was rainy today", and I was kinda bored.

 

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NORTH KOREAN AIRFIELDS

Air Ports - 7

 

NAME

Chongjin

Ihyon

Kwail

Onchon

Pukch'ang

Sunchon

Unchon Up

 

Airfields - 60

 

NAME

 

Ayang Ni Highway Strip

Changjin-up

Changyon Highway Strip

Chik-Tong

Ch'o do

Haeju

Hoeyang Southeast

Hwangju

Hwangsuwon

Hyesan

Hyon-ni

Ichon

Ihyon

Inchon Northeast

Kaechon

Kang Da Ri

Kangdong

Kilchu Hwy

Kojo

Koksan

Koksan South Highway Strip

Kuktong

Kuum-ni

Kwaksan

Kyongsong-Chuul

Maengsan

Manpo

Mirim

Nuchon Ni Highway Strip

Okpyong ni

Ongjin

Orang

Paegam

Panghyon

Panghyon South Highway Strip

Pyong Ni South Highway Strip

Pyongsul Li

Pyongyang

Samjiyon

Sangwon Highway Strip

Sinhung Highway Strip

Sinuiju

Sohung South

Sonchon

Sondok

Sunan

Sunan-up North Highway Strip

Sungam ni

Taebukpo Ri

Taechon

Taechon Northwest

T'aet'an-pihaengjang

Toha Ri North

Toksan

Uiju

Uthachi

Wong Yo Ri Highway Strip

Wonsan

Yong Hung

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PAK GIL YON (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) said that his country totally rejected resolution 1718 and found it unjustifiable. It was “gangster-like” for the Security Council to adopt such a coercive resolution against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, while neglecting the nuclear threat posed by the United States against his country. It was a clear testament that the Council had completely lost its impartiality and was persisting in applying double standards to its work. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was disappointed that the Council was incapable of offering a single word of concern when the United States threatened to launch nuclear pre-emptive attacks, reinforced its armed forces and conducted large-scale military exercises near the Korean peninsula.

 

He said that, on 9 October, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had successfully conducted underground nuclear tests under secure conditions, as a way of bolstering the country’s self-defence. His country’s nuclear test was entirely attributable to United States threats, sanctions and pressure, and every possible effort had been expanded to settle the nuclear issue through dialogue and negotiation.

 

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea indeed wished to denuclearize the Korean peninsula, he said; yet, the Bush Administration had responded to his country’s patient and sincere efforts with sanctions and blockades. His country had, therefore, felt compelled to prove its possession of nuclear weapons to protect itself from the danger of war from the United States. Also, although his country had conducted a nuclear test -- due to American provocation -- it still remained unchanged in its will to denuclearize the Korean peninsula through dialogue and negotiation, as that had been President Kim Il Sung’s last instruction.

 

He said the test did not contradict the Joint Statement of the six-party talks to dismantle nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programmes. Rather, it constituted a positive measure for its implementation. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had clarified more than once that it would have no need for even a single nuclear weapon as long as the United States dropped its hostile policies towards his country, and as long as confidence was built between the two countries. Instead, the United States had manipulated the Security Council into adopting a resolution pressurizing Pyongyang.

 

He said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was ready for both dialogue and confrontation. If the United States persisted in increasing pressure upon his country, it would continue to take physical countermeasures, considering it as a declaration of war.

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The problem with all of this is that, if North Korea continues on its present course? It will embolden

Japan and South Korea to go Nuclear.

 

I don't think that china would appreciate a Nuclear Japan, considering that Japan STILL has issues with China on some territories in the region, and it's all really moving towards a re-newed Nuclear Arms race in that area.

 

 

 

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PAK GIL YON (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) said that his country totally rejected resolution 1718 and found it unjustifiable. It was “gangster-like” for the Security Council to adopt such a coercive resolution against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, while neglecting the nuclear threat posed by the United States against his country. It was a clear testament that the Council had completely lost its impartiality and was persisting in applying double standards to its work. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was disappointed that the Council was incapable of offering a single word of concern when the United States threatened to launch nuclear pre-emptive attacks, reinforced its armed forces and conducted large-scale military exercises near the Korean peninsula.

 

He said that, on 9 October, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had successfully conducted underground nuclear tests under secure conditions, as a way of bolstering the country’s self-defence. His country’s nuclear test was entirely attributable to United States threats, sanctions and pressure, and every possible effort had been expanded to settle the nuclear issue through dialogue and negotiation.

 

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea indeed wished to denuclearize the Korean peninsula, he said; yet, the Bush Administration had responded to his country’s patient and sincere efforts with sanctions and blockades. His country had, therefore, felt compelled to prove its possession of nuclear weapons to protect itself from the danger of war from the United States. Also, although his country had conducted a nuclear test -- due to American provocation -- it still remained unchanged in its will to denuclearize the Korean peninsula through dialogue and negotiation, as that had been President Kim Il Sung’s last instruction.

 

He said the test did not contradict the Joint Statement of the six-party talks to dismantle nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programmes. Rather, it constituted a positive measure for its implementation. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea had clarified more than once that it would have no need for even a single nuclear weapon as long as the United States dropped its hostile policies towards his country, and as long as confidence was built between the two countries. Instead, the United States had manipulated the Security Council into adopting a resolution pressurizing Pyongyang.

 

He said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was ready for both dialogue and confrontation. If the United States persisted in increasing pressure upon his country, it would continue to take physical countermeasures, considering it as a declaration of war.

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