Jump to content
Washington DC Message Boards

Purchase Black Cohosh Extract ----Choose lily!


lily29
 Share

Recommended Posts

Black Cohosh Extract Cimicifuga racemosa Triterpine

 

 

 

Black Cohosh

 

Botanical Name: Actaea racemosa L, Cimicifuga racemosa

Common Names: Black Snakeroot, Bugbane, Bugwort, Rattle Weed, Squawroot

 

Overview

 

More than two centuries ago, Native Americans discovered that the root of the black cohosh plant (Cimicifuga racemosa) helped relieve menstrual cramps, and symptoms of menopause including hot flashes, irritability, mood swings, and sleep disturbances. Today, the roots of black cohosh are still often used for these purposes. In fact, the herb has been widely used for more than 40 years in Europe and is approved in Germany for premenstrual discomfort, painful menstruation, and menopausal symptoms.

 

Menopausal Symptoms

A dozen studies or more conducted throughout the 1980s and 1990s confirm that the long-standing use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms has scientific validity. For example, in a German study involving 629 women, black cohosh improved physical and psychological menopausal symptoms in more than 80% of the participants within four weeks. In a second study, 60 menopausal women were given black cohosh extract, conjugated estrogens, or diazepam (a leading anti-anxiety medication) for three months. Those who received black cohosh reported feeling significantly less depressed and anxious than those who received either estrogens or diazepam. In another study, 80 menopausal women were treated for 12 weeks with black cohosh extract, conjugated estrogens, or placebo. Black cohosh improved anxiety, menopause and vaginal symptoms. In addition, the number of hot flashes dropped from 5 to less than 1 average daily occurences in the black cohosh group compared to those taking estrogen in whom hot flashes dropped from 5 to 3.5 daily occurences.

 

Given these examples, and results of other studies, some experts have concluded that black cohosh may be a safe and effective alternative to estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) for women who cannot or will not take ERT for menopause.

 

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) reports, however, that many of these studies were poorly designed and did not evaluate the safety and effectiveness of black cohosh beyond 6 months of use. Despite this limited evidence, the ACOG still recognizes the value of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms. Until further studies are conducted, however, the ACOG recommends only short-term (less than 6 months) use of this herb for the relief of hot flashes specifically.

 

Hot Flashes with treatment for Brest Cancer

Many breast cancer patients use black cohosh to ease hot flashes, a common side effect of medications used to treat breast cancer such as tamoxifen. While black cohosh may reduce the number and intensity of hot flashes in breast cancer patients, two well-designed studies recently concluded that the herb is no more effective than placebo.

 

In addition, although there is some debate about this, black cohosh may contain plant based estrogens, called phytoestrogens. Therefore, there is some concern that if there are phytoestrogens in black cohosh, they may stimulate the growth of breast tumors. This idea has not been substantiated scientifically; in fact, some studies suggest that black cohosh may inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells in test tubes. Additional research is needed before conclusions can be drawn about use of black cohosh in women with a history of or risk for developing breast cancer (such as strong family history).

 

Arthritis

Preliminary studies also suggest that black cohosh may help reduce inflammation associated osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In a review of scientific studies, researchers concluded that a combination of black cohosh, willow bark (Salix spp.), sarsaparilla (Smilax spp.), guaiacum (Guaiacum officinale) resin, and poplar bark (Populus tremuloides) may help relieve symptoms of osteoarthritis.

 

Osteoporosis

Some experts suggest that the plant based estrogens in black cohosh, in theory, could help prevent osteoporosis. This theory has yet to be tested scientifically.

 

 

******************************************

Your early reply will be appreciated and wish you all of the best and regards!

 

Sincerely yours,

 

Sales Manager:lily liu

 

Bring nature to better life!

 

Organic Herb Inc.

 

Address:N0.1038shanshuirenjia3Rd,kaiyuanRoad,xingsha,changsha,China

Phone: +86 731 4060868

Fax: +86 731 4023669

Mobile: +86 135 17475149

Email: lily@organic-herb.com

MSN messenger: lily@organic-herb.com

Website: http://www.organic-herb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...