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Israel started to hurt US interests and to undermine its values


Guest Adnan Darwash
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Guest Adnan Darwash

One must clarify here that Benjamin Netanyahu did take part in the destruction of 10 civilian aircrafts at Beirut International Airport in 1978. At the time, the UN Security Council denounced the Israeli action as state-sponsored terrorism but the resolution was vetoed by the US. As a matter of fact, over 70% of the US vetoes in the UN were cast to protect Israel from being denounced for crimes committed or violations of international conventions. One may asks, where do Mr Netanyahu gets the strength to challenge, to undermine and to defy the president of the only remaining Super Power? The answer to this question may expose the dilemma facing all those who have occupied the Whitehouse since the days of Dwight Eisenhower. The Jewish control of the US financial institutions and the US media has been influencing Washington foreign policy of successive US presidents; by delivering huge financial and military aids to Israel, by CIA cooperating with MOSSAD to eliminate Israeli enemies and by fighting Jewish wars. But this has been done to the dislike of the Arab masses that were oppressed by pro-USraeli Arab Dictators. The on-going ‘Arab Spring’ made it untenable for the US to render unlimited support for Israeli atrocities. The US must pay attention to its standing in the world as a moral force promoting justice and the rule of law and to defend its significant economic interests in the Arab world. Embracing Israeli agendas has made the United States of America as a party to all Israeli crimes and put Americans at war with Arabs and Muslims. It is true that the Jewish lobby is so strong that it can hurt the chances of any US politician who dares to question the unlimited support for Israel occupation of Arab lands. It is high time for US Presidents to choose serving the nations interests even if that will not help their own chances for re-election. Continuing the past US Middle East policies, in the current environment may cause an un-reparable damage to US strategic interests.

It is degrading for President Obama to travel to Europe this week in order to solicit assistance in putting pressure on Israel to accept apart of his peace plan.

Adnan Darwash, Iraq Occupation Times

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Guest ThinkSpeak

That is the first intellectual post I have read from you. Cite facts to solidify your argument. Tell us about the 70% US vetoes and Jewish control of the US financial institutions and the US media. Otherwise, what your state will just be read as hearsay.

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Guest Luke

It does not take the wisdom of Solomon to see that the United States needs to work on an even-handed Middle East peace deal where both sides are treated fairly.

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Guest Adnan Darwash

That is the first intellectual post I have read from you. Cite facts to solidify your argument. Tell us about the 70% US vetoes and Jewish control of the US financial institutions and the US media. Otherwise, what your state will just be read as hearsay.

 

Do I have to prove that Blankein of Goldmansachs is a Jew? How about Greenberg, Bloomberg, Geitner, Bernache, Goldberg, Silverstein, Goldstein and Goldsmith? From the media, Spielberg and Eisner control Hollywood and Disney. I did google (Isareli Nazi-style Atrocities) and got 290,000 hits. I am not in a position to do your homework. The US vetoes in the UN Security Council can be similarly obtained.

Adnan Darwash, Iraq Occupation Times

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Guest ThinkSpeak

You can give me a better rebuttal.

 

I did Google (Iran Nazi Atrocities) and got 987,000 hits. Then I did Google (Iraq Nazi Atrocities) and got 1,197,000 hits. Numbers mean nothing. Facts mean something. Otherwise, people will label you a propaganda sheep. I went back 15 years.

 

Determining that the situation in Lebanon remained a threat to international peace and security, the Council unanimously adopted resolution 1884 (2009), by which it urged the parties to fully cooperate with the 15-member body and the Secretary-General to achieve a permanent ceasefire and a long-term solution, as envisioned in resolution 1701 (2006).

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1860 is a resolution that was intended to resolve the 2008–09 Gaza War. It was approved by the United Nations Security Council with 14 member states supporting the resolution and one abstaining (the United States) on January 8, 2009 , following 13 days of fighting between Israel and Hamas.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1583, adopted unanimously on January 28, 2005, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon, including resolutions 425 (1978), 426 (1978) and 1553 (2004), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) for a further six months until July 31, 2005 and condemned violence along the Blue Line.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1559, adopted on September 2, 2004, after recalling resolutions 425 (1978), 426 (1978), 520 (1982) and 1553 (2004) on the situation in Lebanon, the Council supported free and fair presidential elections in Lebanon and called upon remaining foreign forces to withdraw from the country. Nine countries voted in favor: Angola, Benin, Chile, France, Germany, Romania, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Six countries abstained: Algeria, Brazil, China, Pakistan, the Philippines and Russia.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1435, adopted on September 24, 2002, after recalling resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973), 1397 (2002), 1402 (2002) and 1403 (2002), the Council demanded the end to Israeli measures in Ramallah, including the destruction of Palestinian infrastructure. Resolution 1435 was adopted by 14 votes to none against and one abstention from the United States. American representatives John Negroponte and John Cunningham stated that the country would not support a "one-sided resolution" which did not explicitly condemn the terrorists or those who gave them safe haven.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1397, adopted on March 12, 2002, after recalling resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), the Council demanded an end to violence during the Second Intifada between the Israeli and Palestinian sides. It was the first Security Council resolution to call for a two-state solution to the conflict. Resolution 1397 was adopted by 14 votes to none against and one abstention from Syria, whose representative felt that the resolution did not address the concerns of Arab countries.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1351, adopted unanimously on May 30, 2001, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) and reaffirming Resolution 1308 (2000), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until November 30, 2001.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1337, adopted unanimously on January 30, 2001, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon, including resolutions 425 (1978), 426 (1978), 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982), 520 (1982) and 1310 (2000), the Council decided to extend the mandate of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) for a further six months until July 31, 2001.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1328, adopted unanimously on November 27, 2000, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) and reaffirming Resolution 1308 (2000), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until May 31, 2001.

 

In United Nations Security Council Resolution 1322, adopted on October 7, 2000, after recalling resolutions 476 (1980), 478 (1980), 672 (1990) and 1073 (1996), the Council deplored the visit by Ariel Sharon to the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the subsequent violence which had resulted in the deaths of over 80 Palestinians. The resolution was sponsored by Malaysia and supported by several European countries.The original version of the resolution sought a strong condemnation of Israel. The United States abstained.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1310, adopted unanimously on July 27, 2000, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon, including resolutions 425 (1978), 426 (1978), 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982), as well as Resolution 1308 (2000), the Council decided to extend the mandate of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) for a further six months until January 31, 2001.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1300, adopted unanimously on May 31, 2000, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until November 30, 2000.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1288, adopted unanimously on January 31, 2000, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon, including resolutions 425 (1978), 426 (1978), 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until July 31, 2000.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1276, adopted unanimously on November 24, 1999, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until May 31, 2000.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1254, adopted unanimously on July 30, 1999, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon including 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) approved in 426 (1978), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until January 31, 2000.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1243, adopted unanimously on May 27, 1999, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until November 30, 1999.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1223, adopted unanimously on January 28, 1999, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon including 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) approved in 426 (1978), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until July 31, 1999.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1211, adopted unanimously on November 25, 1998, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until May 31, 1999.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1188, adopted unanimously on July 30, 1998, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon including 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) approved in 426 (1978), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until January 31, 1999.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1169, adopted unanimously on May 27, 1998, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council extended its mandate for a further six months until November 30, 1998.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1151, adopted unanimously on January 30, 1998, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon including 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) approved in 426 (1978), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until July 31, 1998.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1139, adopted unanimously on November 21, 1997, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council noted its efforts to establish a durable and just peace in the Middle East.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1122, adopted unanimously on July 29, 1997, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon including 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) approved in 426 (1978), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until January 31, 1998.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1109, adopted unanimously on May 28, 1997, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Kofi Annan regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council noted its efforts to establish a durable and just peace in the Middle East.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1095, adopted unanimously on January 28, 1997, after recalling previous resolutions on Israel and Lebanon including 501 (1982), 508 (1982), 509 (1982) and 520 (1982) as well as studying the report by the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) approved in 426 (1978), the Council decided to extend the mandate of UNIFIL for a further six months until July 31, 1997.

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1081, adopted unanimously on November 27, 1996, after considering a report by the Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali regarding the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council noted its efforts to establish a durable and just peace in the Middle East.

 

I will throw you an opinion column that you can cite.

 

Los Angeles Times

 

How Jewish is Hollywood?

 

A poll finds more Americans disagree with the statement that 'Jews control Hollywood.' But here's one Jew who doesn't.

 

By Joel Stein

 

December 19, 2008

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Guest Adnan Darwash

You can give me a better rebuttal.

 

I did Google (Iran Nazi Atrocities) and got 987,000 hits. Then I did Google (Iraq Nazi Atrocities) and got 1,197,000 hits. Numbers mean nothing. Facts mean something. Otherwise, people will label you a propaganda sheep. I went back 15 years.

 

 

 

I will throw you an opinion column that you can cite.

 

Los Angeles Times

 

How Jewish is Hollywood?

 

A poll finds more Americans disagree with the statement that 'Jews control Hollywood.' But here's one Jew who doesn't.

 

By Joel Stein

 

December 19, 2008

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Guest Adnan Darwash

Here is my rebuttal:

1. America has been embracing the on-going Israeli Nazi-style practices* but opposed those of the defunct Saddam (albeit too late).

2. It was an insider, late Marlon Brando, who said that Hollywood was controlled by Jews. You may aslo reject the fact that the Jewish financial mafia is in control of Wall Street.

3. Your lobb-sided list of UN SCO resolutions did not mention ratios of US vetoes to protect Israel to the total number of Vetoes cast,the last of which denouncing the illegal Israeli settlemnts in occupied Arab territories, because it will hurt the the non-existent peace negotiations.

4. From the days of Jewish Dr Madeline Albright, the reasoning for the US vetoes in the UN SCO was because the resoulutions were unbalanced. Which means they failed to denounce the Palestinian victims as well as denouncing the Israeli criminals.

It is for this reason the US is discredited and hated throughout the Middle East.

Adnan Darwash, Iraq Occupation Times

* I am preparing an article on the similarities between the on-going Israeli Nazi practices and those of the defunct Nazi Germany.

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