Jump to content
DC Message Boards
Sign in to follow this  
LAW

Franklin Shelter Residents March on Mayor Fenty's Home

Recommended Posts

LAW    0

Franklin Shelter residents are fed up by daily dismantling of beds at Franklin Shelter, and fed up with Fenty's plan to close the shelter by Oct 1, flip-flopping on earlier promises. Therefore, Shelter residents marched on Fenty's HOME at 4712 17th st NW on August 21.

 

post-8534-1219372321_thumbjpg

 

Marchers approach Fenty's home-it's the one in the background with windows like those at the Israeli Embassy

 

post-8534-1219372311_thumbjpg

 

Homeless shelter residents face off with the Mayor in front of his posh 17th st home.

 

The Mayor responded by promising to meet with shelter residents at "DHS" on Monday, but REFUSED to discuss the issue in front of his home-even after scrambling home to meet Franklin Shelter residents in the first place!

 

When put to it, he bluntly refused to even stop the daily dismantling of beds at Franklin that are reducing its capacity, down to 249 beds from 300 prior to August 1 as of August 21.

 

Mr Fenty, how would you like it if homeless activists took apart YOUR bed during the day?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

Amen on this post Law, and are you helping them out since you are a lawyer?

Just curious.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Franklin Shelter residents are fed up by daily dismantling of beds at Franklin Shelter, and fed up with Fenty's plan to close the shelter by Oct 1, flip-flopping on earlier promises. Therefore, Shelter residents marched on Fenty's HOME at 4712 17th st NW on August 21.

 

post-8534-1219372321_thumbjpg

 

Marchers approach Fenty's home-it's the one in the background with windows like those at the Israeli Embassy

 

post-8534-1219372311_thumbjpg

 

Homeless shelter residents face off with the Mayor in front of his posh 17th st home.

 

The Mayor responded by promising to meet with shelter residents at "DHS" on Monday, but REFUSED to discuss the issue in front of his home-even after scrambling home to meet Franklin Shelter residents in the first place!

 

When put to it, he bluntly refused to even stop the daily dismantling of beds at Franklin that are reducing its capacity, down to 249 beds from 300 prior to August 1 as of August 21.

 

Mr Fenty, how would you like it if homeless activists took apart YOUR bed during the day?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

Law you gave me a good idea though, Lets see how Mayor Fenty would like it If I made them politically UNSTOPPABLE.

 

I bet that would CURL fenty's hairs to no end "This is the part That I do like about the power part".

 

I mean let’s be real about it, I have cost several Large corporations some Large contracts in other parts of the world, and that was just because they messed with me.

 

Filing with the Better Business Bureau is not enough for me.

 

Ya know, maybe I do have some anger management problems, but I can live with it.

]:)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

http://www.50years.org/cms/updates/story/341

 

Oct 13, 2006

by By Elissa Silverman

District officials have scrapped plans to lease the historic Franklin School at 13th and K streets NW to a group led by developer Herbert S. Miller, saying they want to keep the building as a shelter for the homeless.

 

Brenda Donald Walker, deputy mayor for children, youth, families and elders, announced the decision this week at a meeting of the Interagency Council on Homelessness.

Walker said the city is negotiating a settlement to sever its agreement with Miller and his partners at WDC Franklin LLC. They signed a lease with the city in July 2005 to transform the property into a boutique hotel.

 

The agreement came under scrutiny this year when members of the D.C. Council and the legislative body's lawyer questioned whether the lease was valid because the council had not voted to approve the deal.

 

Walker said yesterday that she and Stanley Jackson, deputy mayor for planning and economic development, recommended that the city terminate the lease. Franklin has 240 beds for the homeless and is often filled.

 

"We've been searching the downtown area for shelter space, and we hadn't come up with anything," said Walker, who added that Franklin will be renovated.

 

The Franklin School was built in 1869 by the prominent Washington architect Adolph Cluss, who also designed Eastern Market.

 

The school, on prime downtown real estate, has been a focus of political controversy. The city decided a few years ago to use the building as a temporary men's shelter.

 

Last year, the city selected a group headed by Miller to redevelop the property. Miller is a well-connected contributor to local politicians and has held several campaign fundraisers during this election season.

 

Miller has run into trouble with another high-profile development project, a mix of condominiums, shops and parking garages he wants to build near the new ballpark for the Washington Nationals. The deal collapsed a few weeks ago when he and the D.C. Sports and Entertainment Commission, which is building the stadium, failed to agree on financial terms.

 

"We have no desire to kick homeless out of a shelter," said developer N. William Jarvis, a partner with Miller in the Franklin deal. "I'm sure we'll be sitting down soon to talk with the city about how we will settle all these matters."

 

Homeless advocates and Franklin Shelter residents praised the decision yesterday. They have fought to save the shelter, holding demonstrations outside City Hall, lobbying officials and maintaining a Web site.

 

Jesse Smith, who has lived at the shelter for the past six months, said yesterday that saving Franklin was an important victory.

 

The city government "has not been inclusive with development for those who don't have influence or money," said Mary Ann Luby, outreach coordinator for the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless. "Here we have a place right smack in middle of all this expensive development which will be for people who struggle and offer them opportunities to get them out of homelessness."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×