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Human    0

In many of these demonstrations we have all seen the Mexican flag flying high. This is not Mexico, it is also not The United States of Mexico.

 

 

Those who want Illegal Immigration to continue DO NOT WANT A CLOSED BORDER. We in the United States

WANT to controll our OWN BORDERS, and not let ANOTHER Country to dictate to us when we can or cannot controll our own borders.

 

 

 

 

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http://www.washtimes.com/op-ed/20060329-084824-8472r.htm

 

In 1907, during one of the great immigration waves, President Teddy Roosevelt said that the immigrant who comes here "in good faith ... shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin." However, he added, "We have room but for one flag, the American flag."

 

Words well worth recalling as we noticed what student protesters decided to hoist up their high school flagpole while ostensibly demonstrating against immigration reform. In Spanish this is called reconquista, the reconquering of Mexican land lost during the Mexican-American war (1846-48), and its appearance in Los Angeles this week adds a dark dimension to the entire immigration debate.

 

In contrast to Mexican immigrants, those who emigrated to America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries came mostly from countries -- Ireland, Poland, Italy, Bohemia, Germany and Greece -- that had little if any significant historical dealings with the United States. Nearly all had never had colonial possessions in America, nor had lost territory on the continent in war. Their citizens emigrated because they were inspired by hopes for a new and better life, not redress for past indignities. In time they became Americans.

 

Something entirely different motivates the Hispanic radicals. Their inspiration is anti-Americanism, which they cheerfully articulate in banners proclaiming "This is our continent, not yours!" They claim citizenship, or at least the benefits of citizenship, to be theirs by right, rather than something to be earned. And their ultimate fantasy is no different than the radical Muslim immigrants living in the slums outside Paris: To retake what they think was formerly their ancestors' land, if not in name then in numbers. Tragically, they are able to dupe idealistic students into advancing their cause by masking their true intentions behind the facade of ethnic pride or civil rights. Nothing is more un-American, especially for those requesting American citizenship.

 

We acknowledge that a majority of protesters gathering in Los Angeles and San Diego this week do not believe in the reconquista agenda. Their disagreement is with Congress, not America. But by accepting radicals into their ranks, by allowing students to desecrate the American flag, they have given tacit approval of the reconquista message. If the leaders of the Latino community wish to bring public opinion to their side, they must condemn these verbal and symbolic calls for reconquest.

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Luke_Wilbur    5

For the most part I am for the Immigration Reform Act, but I have a problem with sections 701 and 707. Given the current high workloads faced by America’s federal courts, it is all too likely that many immigrants’ appeals would never receive serious review from a judge and would be dismissed without any judicial consideration of their merits.

 

Section 701 would direct all immigration appeals to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, greatly increasing the workload of that court. The Federal Circuit has no experience with immigration, civil rights or related constitutional claims. That court currently hears only cases concerning patents, trademarks and veterans’ benefits.

 

Section 707 of the bill would create a new barrier to judicial review of immigration appeals by instituting one-judge pre-screening of cases that get to the federal circuit court level. Under this provision, if the judge does not act on a case within 60 days, the case gets dismissed. If the judge does find the case meritorious, that judge would then issue a "certificate of reviewability" that allows the case to be heard by a three-judge panel.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

My point that I have tried to argue on other boards is that with most of the illegal immigrants coming from Mexico is in that Mexico is avoiding REAL political reform with in its own country by dumping it's less educated with in our own borders. As well as subsidizing it's failed economic policies. Add to that, that both sides are playing politics with this "it's a recipe for disaster".

 

During the Clinton years, the Clinton administration view towards Latin America was a hands off policy towards our neighbors south of the border, with economic as well political reform shelved. This caused the Latin American countries to turn to the Middle East for it’s economic as well as its political solutions.

 

 

The Republicans solution to this is based on just the economic solutions, and is not inclusive of the political reforms' needed to stabilize the region.

 

We need Border Security for the failed Policies FROM BOTH POLITICAL PARTIES.

 

There are other factors at play here with the globalization of countries economies as well in Latin America ;they too have a problem with out sourcing to the Asian Continent.

 

In any case With 16 million illegal immigrants the United States simply does not have the infrastructure in place to handle the processing of all of these people. <~~~~~~ people; all of this is what your facing.

 

 

Ladies, and Gentlemen what I have posted in here is what's going, and God really help us ALL.

 

 

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For the most part I am for the Immigration Reform Act, but I have a problem with sections 701 and 707. Given the current high workloads faced by America’s federal courts, it is all too likely that many immigrants’ appeals would never receive serious review from a judge and would be dismissed without any judicial consideration of their merits.

 

Section 701 would direct all immigration appeals to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, greatly increasing the workload of that court. The Federal Circuit has no experience with immigration, civil rights or related constitutional claims. That court currently hears only cases concerning patents, trademarks and veterans’ benefits.

 

Section 707 of the bill would create a new barrier to judicial review of immigration appeals by instituting one-judge pre-screening of cases that get to the federal circuit court level. Under this provision, if the judge does not act on a case within 60 days, the case gets dismissed. If the judge does find the case meritorious, that judge would then issue a "certificate of reviewability" that allows the case to be heard by a three-judge panel.

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Luke_Wilbur    5

Human,

I really think that you are right.

 

Here is a factoid. Did you know that since 2000, there has been a free flow of people across the US-Canada border with over 200 million crossings by US and Canadian citizens each year. Since the Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement of 1988, businessmen and professionals from both countries have been able to cross on a daily basis without visas.

 

In year 2000, President Vicente Fox of Mexico advocated the idea of free flow of people across the US-Mexico border as a second phase of NAFTA, which would be completed in ten years. In May 2005, President Fox stated in a new interview, "There is no doubt that Mexicans, filled with dignity, willingness and ability to work are doing jobs that not even blacks want to do there in the United States".

 

A new report from the San Diego Association of Governments says the time trucks spent waiting at the Otay Mesa and Tecate border crossings last year cost the local binational economy $6 billion in lost business and more than 51,000 jobs.

 

My worry is that a more rigid U.S. immigration policy and Mexico's declining economy will propell Andrés Manuel López Obrador into the presidency and Mexico's free trade economic model will change to become a more protectionist reform policy.

 

If this happens Mexico's economy will surely sink and America's economy will suffer like it did in 1995. I remember the Peso was not worth the ink and paper it was made with.

 

The truth is that if America does not want to fall below Asia, we need think about stimulating the economies of our friends in Mexico, Central, and South America.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

Okay Luke! here is an honest answer;

 

The illegal immigrants already here will more than likely be allowed to stay under an Amnesty agreement.

 

For the future though, so as to not repeat the same mistakes of the past, a real distinction between Mexico and the United States as in Border Security, as well as a combination of an electronic, physical fence has to be constructed.

 

Free Trade Agreements are taking shape all across Latin America, and NOT just with the United States, but included with the FTA's are China, Syria, Libya, Japan and so on.

 

 

It is not an all or nothing deal in terms of the illegal immigrants staying here with out proper documentation, as well as penalties for coming here and jumping the line.

 

In politics there is always compromise, to leave the Mexico, United States Border as it is now will solve NOTHING. The compromise will be the Border Fence. Both sides get what they want, and neither is fully happy.

 

More than likely as part of the agreement an RFID system will be put in place to be sure that the people coming here are who they say they are.

 

 

 

 

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Human,

I really think that you are right.

 

Here is a factoid. Did you know that since 2000, there has been a free flow of people across the US-Canada border with over 200 million crossings by US and Canadian citizens each year. Since the Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement of 1988, businessmen and professionals from both countries have been able to cross on a daily basis without visas.

 

In year 2000, President Vicente Fox of Mexico advocated the idea of free flow of people across the US-Mexico border as a second phase of NAFTA, which would be completed in ten years. In May 2005, President Fox stated in a new interview, "There is no doubt that Mexicans, filled with dignity, willingness and ability to work are doing jobs that not even blacks want to do there in the United States".

 

A new report from the San Diego Association of Governments says the time trucks spent waiting at the Otay Mesa and Tecate border crossings last year cost the local binational economy $6 billion in lost business and more than 51,000 jobs.

 

My worry is that a more rigid U.S. immigration policy and Mexico's declining economy will propell Andrés Manuel López Obrador into the presidency and Mexico's free trade economic model will change to become a more protectionist reform policy.

 

If this happens Mexico's economy will surely sink and America's economy will suffer like it did in 1995. I remember the Peso was not worth the ink and paper it was made with.

 

The truth is that if America does not want to fall below Asia, we need think about stimulating the economies of our friends in Mexico, Central, and South America.

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Guest im not sure   
Guest im not sure

Honestly I know we are all worried about the economy. But the key word is ILLEGAL immigrants. Thats the way i see it. You are illegal, so lets bag them up and ship them off. I am for LEGAL immigration because it shows that you can follow the rules and take the proper steps to become an American citizen. I dont care how many blue collar jobs they hold because than they are working an illegal job. Sure everyone says regular americans will not work these jobs. I bet if you get rid of illegal immigrants the amount of money to do that job would increase because they would have to encourage people to work there. But that is just my opinion. You dont see americans running down to other countries pretending to be thier citizens.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

One of the messages that BOTH PARTIES are sending out of which I really don't like

Is that "if you have the power? Illegal is just a word, it has no meaning what so ever".

 

Also that identity theft is okay as long as you are here illegally.

 

People just don't think in what type of other crimes that this fosters.

 

There are 16 million illegal aliens here in the United States, and they need S.S. numbers to get work.

So who's social security numbers are they using?

 

You can do the math its simple; it would come out to 1 in 20 American's Social Security number IS being used illegally.

 

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Honestly I know we are all worried about the economy. But the key word is ILLEGAL immigrants. Thats the way i see it. You are illegal, so lets bag them up and ship them off. I am for LEGAL immigration because it shows that you can follow the rules and take the proper steps to become an American citizen. I dont care how many blue collar jobs they hold because than they are working an illegal job. Sure everyone says regular americans will not work these jobs. I bet if you get rid of illegal immigrants the amount of money to do that job would increase because they would have to encourage people to work there. But that is just my opinion. You dont see americans running down to other countries pretending to be thier citizens.

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Guest im not sure   
Guest im not sure

I completely agree. If they do that illegally what else do they do? Glad someone else still knows the meaning of ILLEGAL. But the parties want to grant them amnesty. The old theory for some of these people was once they got to the US they were safe because we would keep them. I am up for a new idea. Like if you somehow get your butt over here, were just gonna ship you back so you can waste your time again. Wait the five years like everyone else seems to have to. This makes me respect the ones that have taken the time to follow the proper steps. It shows they care about the country and arent over here just for our money to send home to other places.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

Yeap!!! and that's why we will have Border Security, there is no other choice, and it aint just cause of illegal

immigration either "and all the crimes associated with it". Just read my posts on World Politics on this board and you will understand why.

 

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I completely agree. If they do that illegally what else do they do? Glad someone else still knows the meaning of ILLEGAL. But the parties want to grant them amnesty. The old theory for some of these people was once they got to the US they were safe because we would keep them. I am up for a new idea. Like if you somehow get your butt over here, were just gonna ship you back so you can waste your time again. Wait the five years like everyone else seems to have to. This makes me respect the ones that have taken the time to follow the proper steps. It shows they care about the country and arent over here just for our money to send home to other places.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

Jane, nope!!! My spelling, and most importantly my punctuation would never survive an editors PEN.

 

But if you have a question then PLEASE go for it "ask", or a comment.

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Human are you a reporter?

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Guest The White House   
Guest The White House

THE PRESIDENT: Good evening. I've asked for a few minutes of your time to discuss a matter of national importance -- the reform of America's immigration system.

 

The issue of immigration stirs intense emotions, and in recent weeks, Americans have seen those emotions on display. On the streets of major cities, crowds have rallied in support of those in our country illegally. At our southern border, others have organized to stop illegal immigrants from coming in. Across the country, Americans are trying to reconcile these contrasting images. And in Washington, the debate over immigration reform has reached a time of decision. Tonight, I will make it clear where I stand, and where I want to lead our country on this vital issue.

 

We must begin by recognizing the problems with our immigration system. For decades, the United States has not been in complete control of its borders. As a result, many who want to work in our economy have been able to sneak across our border, and millions have stayed.

 

Once here, illegal immigrants live in the shadows of our society. Many use forged documents to get jobs, and that makes it difficult for employers to verify that the workers they hire are legal. Illegal immigration puts pressure on public schools and hospitals, it strains state and local budgets, and brings crime to our communities. These are real problems. Yet we must remember that the vast majority of illegal immigrants are decent people who work hard, support their families, practice their faith, and lead responsible lives. They are a part of American life, but they are beyond the reach and protection of American law.

 

We're a nation of laws, and we must enforce our laws. We're also a nation of immigrants, and we must uphold that tradition, which has strengthened our country in so many ways. These are not contradictory goals. America can be a lawful society and a welcoming society at the same time. We will fix the problems created by illegal immigration, and we will deliver a system that is secure, orderly, and fair. So I support comprehensive immigration reform that will accomplish five clear objectives.

 

First, the United States must secure its borders. This is a basic responsibility of a sovereign nation. It is also an urgent requirement of our national security. Our objective is straightforward: The border should be open to trade and lawful immigration, and shut to illegal immigrants, as well as criminals, drug dealers, and terrorists.

 

I was a governor of a state that has a 1,200-mile border with Mexico. So I know how difficult it is to enforce the border, and how important it is. Since I became President, we've increased funding for border security by 66 percent, and expanded the Border Patrol from about 9,000 to 12,000 agents. The men and women of our Border Patrol are doing a fine job in difficult circumstances, and over the past five years, they have apprehended and sent home about six million people entering America illegally.

 

Despite this progress, we do not yet have full control of the border, and I am determined to change that. Tonight I'm calling on Congress to provide funding for dramatic improvements in manpower and technology at the border. By the end of 2008, we'll increase the number of Border Patrol officers by an additional 6,000. When these new agents are deployed, we'll have more than doubled the size of the Border Patrol during my presidency.

 

At the same time, we're launching the most technologically advanced border security initiative in American history. We will construct high-tech fences in urban corridors, and build new patrol roads and barriers in rural areas. We'll employ motion sensors, infrared cameras, and unmanned aerial vehicles to prevent illegal crossings. America has the best technology in the world, and we will ensure that the Border Patrol has the technology they need to do their job and secure our border.

 

Training thousands of new Border Patrol agents and bringing the most advanced technology to the border will take time. Yet the need to secure our border is urgent. So I'm announcing several immediate steps to strengthen border enforcement during this period of transition:

 

One way to help during this transition is to use the National Guard. So, in coordination with governors, up to 6,000 Guard members will be deployed to our southern border. The Border Patrol will remain in the lead. The Guard will assist the Border Patrol by operating surveillance systems, analyzing intelligence, installing fences and vehicle barriers, building patrol roads, and providing training. Guard units will not be involved in direct law enforcement activities -- that duty will be done by the Border Patrol. This initial commitment of Guard members would last for a period of one year. After that, the number of Guard forces will be reduced as new Border Patrol agents and new technologies come online. It is important for Americans to know that we have enough Guard forces to win the war on terror, to respond to natural disasters, and to help secure our border.

 

The United States is not going to militarize the southern border. Mexico is our neighbor, and our friend. We will continue to work cooperatively to improve security on both sides of the border, to confront common problems like drug trafficking and crime, and to reduce illegal immigration.

 

Another way to help during this period of transition is through state and local law enforcement in our border communities. So we'll increase federal funding for state and local authorities assisting the Border Patrol on targeted enforcement missions. We will give state and local authorities the specialized training they need to help federal officers apprehend and detain illegal immigrants. State and local law enforcement officials are an important part of our border security and they need to be a part of our strategy to secure our borders.

 

The steps I've outlined will improve our ability to catch people entering our country illegally. At the same time, we must ensure that every illegal immigrant we catch crossing our southern border is returned home. More than 85 percent of the illegal immigrants we catch crossing the southern border are Mexicans, and most are sent back home within 24 hours. But when we catch illegal immigrants from other country [sic] it is not as easy to send them home. For many years, the government did not have enough space in our detention facilities to hold them while the legal process unfolded. So most were released back into our society and asked to return for a court date. When the date arrived, the vast majority did not show up. This practice, called "catch and release," is unacceptable, and we will end it.

 

We're taking several important steps to meet this goal. We've expanded the number of beds in our detention facilities, and we will continue to add more. We've expedited the legal process to cut the average deportation time. And we're making it clear to foreign governments that they must accept back their citizens who violate our immigration laws. As a result of these actions, we've ended "catch and release" for illegal immigrants from some countries. And I will ask Congress for additional funding and legal authority, so we can end "catch and release" at the southern border once and for all. When people know that they'll be caught and sent home if they enter our country illegally, they will be less likely to try to sneak in.

 

Second, to secure our border, we must create a temporary worker program. The reality is that there are many people on the other side of our border who will do anything to come to America to work and build a better life. They walk across miles of desert in the summer heat, or hide in the back of 18-wheelers to reach our country. This creates enormous pressure on our border that walls and patrols alone will not stop. To secure the border effectively, we must reduce the numbers of people trying to sneak across.

 

Therefore, I support a temporary worker program that would create a legal path for foreign workers to enter our country in an orderly way, for a limited period of time. This program would match willing foreign workers with willing American employers for jobs Americans are not doing. Every worker who applies for the program would be required to pass criminal background checks. And temporary workers must return to their home country at the conclusion of their stay.

 

A temporary worker program would meet the needs of our economy, and it would give honest immigrants a way to provide for their families while respecting the law. A temporary worker program would reduce the appeal of human smugglers, and make it less likely that people would risk their lives to cross the border. It would ease the financial burden on state and local governments, by replacing illegal workers with lawful taxpayers. And above all, a temporary worker program would add to our security by making certain we know who is in our country and why they are here.

 

Third, we need to hold employers to account for the workers they hire. It is against the law to hire someone who is in this country illegally. Yet businesses often cannot verify the legal status of their employees because of the widespread problem of document fraud. Therefore, comprehensive immigration reform must include a better system for verifying documents and work eligibility. A key part of that system should be a new identification card for every legal foreign worker. This card should use biometric technology, such as digital fingerprints, to make it tamper-proof. A tamper-proof card would help us enforce the law, and leave employers with no excuse for violating it. And by making it harder for illegal immigrants to find work in our country, we would discourage people from crossing the border illegally in the first place.

 

Fourth, we must face the reality that millions of illegal immigrants are here already. They should not be given an automatic path to citizenship. This is amnesty, and I oppose it. Amnesty would be unfair to those who are here lawfully, and it would invite further waves of illegal immigration.

 

Some in this country argue that the solution is to deport every illegal immigrant, and that any proposal short of this amounts to amnesty. I disagree. It is neither wise, nor realistic to round up millions of people, many with deep roots in the United States, and send them across the border. There is a rational middle ground between granting an automatic path to citizenship for every illegal immigrant, and a program of mass deportation. That middle ground recognizes there are differences between an illegal immigrant who crossed the border recently, and someone who has worked here for many years, and has a home, a family, and an otherwise clean record.

 

I believe that illegal immigrants who have roots in our country and want to stay should have to pay a meaningful penalty for breaking the law, to pay their taxes, to learn English, and to work in a job for a number of years. People who meet these conditions should be able to apply for citizenship, but approval would not be automatic, and they will have to wait in line behind those who played by the rules and followed the law. What I've just described is not amnesty, it is a way for those who have broken the law to pay their debt to society, and demonstrate the character that makes a good citizen.

 

Fifth, we must honor the great American tradition of the melting pot, which has made us one nation out of many peoples. The success of our country depends upon helping newcomers assimilate into our society, and embrace our common identity as Americans. Americans are bound together by our shared ideals, an appreciation of our history, respect for the flag we fly, and an ability to speak and write the English language. English is also the key to unlocking the opportunity of America. English allows newcomers to go from picking crops to opening a grocery, from cleaning offices to running offices, from a life of low-paying jobs to a diploma, a career, and a home of their own. When immigrants assimilate and advance in our society, they realize their dreams, they renew our spirit, and they add to the unity of America.

 

Tonight, I want to speak directly to members of the House and the Senate: An immigration reform bill needs to be comprehensive, because all elements of this problem must be addressed together, or none of them will be solved at all. The House has passed an immigration bill. The Senate should act by the end of this month so we can work out the differences between the two bills, and Congress can pass a comprehensive bill for me to sign into law.

 

America needs to conduct this debate on immigration in a reasoned and respectful tone. Feelings run deep on this issue, and as we work it out, all of us need to keep some things in mind. We cannot build a unified country by inciting people to anger, or playing on anyone's fears, or exploiting the issue of immigration for political gain. We must always remember that real lives will be affected by our debates and decisions, and that every human being has dignity and value no matter what their citizenship papers say.

 

I know many of you listening tonight have a parent or a grandparent who came here from another country with dreams of a better life. You know what freedom meant to them, and you know that America is a more hopeful country because of their hard work and sacrifice. As President, I've had the opportunity to meet people of many backgrounds, and hear what America means to them. On a visit to Bethesda Naval Hospital, Laura and I met a wounded Marine named Guadalupe Denogean. Master Gunnery Sergeant Denogean came to the United States from Mexico when he was a boy. He spent his summers picking crops with his family, and then he volunteered for the United States Marine Corps as soon as he was able. During the liberation of Iraq, Master Gunnery Sergeant Denogean was seriously injured. And when asked if he had any requests, he made two: a promotion for the corporal who helped rescue him, and the chance to become an American citizen. And when this brave Marine raised his right hand, and swore an oath to become a citizen of the country he had defended for more than 26 years, I was honored to stand at his side.

 

We will always be proud to welcome people like Guadalupe Denogean as fellow Americans. Our new immigrants are just what they've always been -- people willing to risk everything for the dream of freedom. And America remains what she has always been: the great hope on the horizon, an open door to the future, a blessed and promised land. We honor the heritage of all who come here, no matter where they come from, because we trust in our country's genius for making us all Americans -- one nation under God.

 

Thank you, and good night.

 

END 8:18 P.M. EDT

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Guest pinche tejano   
Guest pinche tejano

The Marines kill Hispanic Americans. It's happened before. It will happen again. They can't tell the difference between us and the Mexicans. Can you? Someone please for the love of God pass this on to some Democrat who can carry the Banner of Esequiel Hernandez, so his tragic tale will not be repeated. He would tell you himself, if he was not dead.

 

Let me tell you the story of a boy by the name of Esequiel Hernandez, Jr. This story will unfortunately be posthumous, due his being gunned down, assassin-style by a group of Marines on patrol on American soil. On May 20, 1997, Esequiel was herding the pride of his poor Hispanic family in Redford, Texas. He took his goats down to water everyday after school. What he did not know was he was being stalked by a group of four marines who had been camped just outside his small village for about three days.

 

That's right folks, American Marines on COMBAT patrol on American soil. This ***brown trout*** would never fly in Nebraska. Could you imagine? There's no **to perform an anatomical sexual impossibility**ing way. In the name of the no-win Drug War, the lower Rio Grande Valley was put under Martial Law. Last time I checked, this was not the mission of the United States Marine Corps, and even less likely is the prospect of these marines having been given proper training to handle such a task.

 

Combine these ingredients, and you have a recipe for disaster, Texas-style. While the facts have never fully come to light; there are certain parts of this encounter which should raise flags for any American. Here are the facts as we have been told by the Man of why Esequiel Hernandez became the first U.S. civilian to be intentionally killed on American soil by a regular U.S. soldier in 29 years.

 

To start off this odyssey, let us begin by profiling the horrid animal the Marines faced on that dusty plain of mythical Texas that fateful day. He must of been one huge mean bastard for a tactical squad of four marines, armed, and in full gear to feel the need to end his life. Just look at the evidence. He volunteered at the Living History project at the Fort Leaton Historical Site, and was even selected as a student-aide for the historic re-enactments of the Longhorn Cattle Drives at Big Bend Ranch State Park. What an **smile**.

 

His love of his Hispanic culture was so great when he was the only boy to sign up for traditional dance classes, he went and recruited five more boys to keep the art form alive. God, the full scope of this jerk is coming into focus.

 

Far away is the house where Banuelos shot Hernandez. From there it would have been impossible to see the Marines in thier field camo.

 

Unlike most men his age of 18, he was not saying his money to by Air Jordans or the newest Playstation game. He was saving his money to buy enough bricks to add an addition to his family home for his own private room. He didn't venture across the river to Mexico to drink under age, and was known for his shy but approachable manner. It¹s a surprise no one killed him sooner.

 

Esequiel Hernandez, Jr., RIP

 

What horrible thing was he doing before he was shot? His father interrupted him from studying to go out and water the goats. What a jerk, studying? I'm glad this menace to society has finally been eradicated before any white women were ravaged.

 

Now, we come to the other main actors in this tragic event which has become a signpost of just how much American apathy has built. Four marines were in the field being lead by an off-site, NON-commissioned officer. Unknown to the town was the fact that this unit, part the unofficial full-scale war of the government against it's own people, had been camping and stalking them for several days before the incident. During this time, there was no way the Marines could have missed the fact these people were ranchers, and ranchers water their goats. We are funny that way. Following that assumption, a boy with a herd of goats is not running drugs. Nope. In fact I'd be willing to bet he was a rancher.

 

The Marines were wearing Ghillie camouflage with twigs and leaves interwoven with brown and gray fabric that blurs the human form making them invisible, even from a few feet. These are Marines who are trained to be kill machines, and they are the best at the world and I personal applaud them and pray for them in Iraq. Marines either hunker down and take it, or shoot to kill. The firearm they were facing, carried by Esequiel was a World War I single combine .22. A glorified BB gun. Scarface of the Ghetto Boys got shot at point blank by his girlfriend and drove himself to the hospital after getting shot by a .22. The Marines were in full-camoflauge war wear, battle armor and some 200 yards away. You do the math on who had the advantage.

 

The second major problem is the angle in which Hernandez was shot. Mainly the point being he was shot in the back. There was no way he could have been facing the Marines from where the fatal shot was fired. If only the goats could talk they would tell you. Also, he was shot right by his house, which an well-trained reckon unit surely would have realized was his home. Hernandez was right-handed, which meant his left side would be facing his target when firing his World War I single combine .22. . However, he was wounded on the right side, said his attorney, Dan Estrada of Fort Worth. The way the casings were laid on the ground, the metal imprints on his flesh and slight bruises tell the story of his third shot being in the opposite direction of the Marines, which would easily tell why the bullet was in his back.

 

Marines are not trained to say "Stop! Police! Put down your weapon!" Nor are they trained to yell, "We hiding in your bushes, please go herd somewhere else." Which brings us to a major point in the case, what the hell were Marines doing on private property? The Marines must obtain permission before they can conduct activities on privately owned land. Marine Col. Thomas Kelley said they had permission, but Hernandez was murdered on the land of Alberto Carrasco, who said he never exercised that option. Oops.

 

Set all this aside for a moment and pretend that the Marines did, in fact, feel threatened from the little goat herder, their actions afterwards were a bit odd. To begin, they never administered first aid. Even worse is they did not call for assistance until a full 22 minutes after the incident. Later autopsy reports show that he actually bled to death, but why would the Marines want him alive to tell his side? Even weirder is they took their sweet time contacting sheriff's Deputy Oscar Gallegos, and initially the story was Hernandez had fallen down a well and hit his head.

 

The Marines all instantly stonewalled and offered little to no information, only saying they were acting in self-defense. Military operations in the area were suspended and these poor Marines were hounded too much, so the Marines closed the case and sent the task unit in question back home to Camp Pendleton, California. District Attorney Albert Valadez could sense the haste and tried to get the records, only to hit upon a trend from there on out of stonewalling from the military. But he was not alone, other more influential people also felt the silence.

 

A major crusader for the cause, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, chairman of the House panel overseeing immigration issues at the time, sent a five-page letter to Attorney General Janet Reno complaining of lack of cooperation from her department. Department of Defense lawyers rebuffed attempts by Texas Rangers and Rep. Smith to get the most basic of information. And in August of 1997, Mr. Smith accused the Justice Department of hampering his staff's inquiries into the shooting.

 

"For two months, my congressional oversight has been obstructed by a never-ending series of useless referrals, unreturned phone calls and broken promises," Smith said.

 

Though the community was outraged, a grand jury decided to not indict the soldiers in a case scarred by secrecy. The military followed suit and there were no court-martials. An explanation was never given besides, "self-defense."

 

And what has become of Redford, the town that has tried to make Hernandez's case a national concern? The town constantly lives under fear. Children will not go out to play in fear of getting shot. One family has sold their goats and will not let their children out in the afternoons. The hordes of Counselors and Psychologists they sent to Columbine to help the children there cope with the trauma never arrived at Redford, even after repeated request from the National Hispanic Caucus.

 

The town's goat co-operative is no longer operational and the town is listless. Paranoia? Not at all. Locals tell of the more pressure they put on national media, the more the harassment they get from the military. Residents reported nighttime flights with lights off, goats scared away on purpose by helicopters, and people on horseback being patrolled and observed from unmarked helicopters. They even tell of 2am flights so low it felt like their house would crumble.

 

This is America, the land of the free, or is it? All this town wants is a few simple things that can help their wounds heal, and any self-respecting citizen of these United States should be more than willing to help. The most glaring one is their feeling the military should have rules for engagement for dealing with citizens on American soil. I was shocked and appalled to find out most of the units just seemed to be cowboying out there in our own backyards. The second thing they want is Hernandez to be clear of any wrong doing, which seems simple enough right? Wrong. The American government needs a scapegoat for this and dead men don't talk.

 

Last of all, they do not want American Marines patrolling their backyards. Could you imagine looking out your bay window and seeing a platoon on patrol going down your street? If you don't take action now, this may not be a hypothetical question, but reality. A reality that has already ended in tragedy. Is the arrest of a few illegal migrant workers worth the death of American citizens?

 

Wake up America, or you could be the next one crushed under the wheels of justice.

 

 

http://www.rockymounttelegram.com/nation/c...r_Security.html

 

http://edition.cnn.com/2006/US/05/15/immigration.border.ap

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Guest Guest   
Guest Guest

I got what I wanted "Border Security". Every one else can argue the rest to their hearts content.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE PRESIDENT: Good evening. I've asked for a few minutes of your time to discuss a matter of national importance -- the reform of America's immigration system.

 

The issue of immigration stirs intense emotions, and in recent weeks, Americans have seen those emotions on display. On the streets of major cities, crowds have rallied in support of those in our country illegally. At our southern border, others have organized to stop illegal immigrants from coming in. Across the country, Americans are trying to reconcile these contrasting images. And in Washington, the debate over immigration reform has reached a time of decision. Tonight, I will make it clear where I stand, and where I want to lead our country on this vital issue.

 

We must begin by recognizing the problems with our immigration system. For decades, the United States has not been in complete control of its borders. As a result, many who want to work in our economy have been able to sneak across our border, and millions have stayed.

 

Once here, illegal immigrants live in the shadows of our society. Many use forged documents to get jobs, and that makes it difficult for employers to verify that the workers they hire are legal. Illegal immigration puts pressure on public schools and hospitals, it strains state and local budgets, and brings crime to our communities. These are real problems. Yet we must remember that the vast majority of illegal immigrants are decent people who work hard, support their families, practice their faith, and lead responsible lives. They are a part of American life, but they are beyond the reach and protection of American law.

 

We're a nation of laws, and we must enforce our laws. We're also a nation of immigrants, and we must uphold that tradition, which has strengthened our country in so many ways. These are not contradictory goals. America can be a lawful society and a welcoming society at the same time. We will fix the problems created by illegal immigration, and we will deliver a system that is secure, orderly, and fair. So I support comprehensive immigration reform that will accomplish five clear objectives.

 

First, the United States must secure its borders. This is a basic responsibility of a sovereign nation. It is also an urgent requirement of our national security. Our objective is straightforward: The border should be open to trade and lawful immigration, and shut to illegal immigrants, as well as criminals, drug dealers, and terrorists.

 

I was a governor of a state that has a 1,200-mile border with Mexico. So I know how difficult it is to enforce the border, and how important it is. Since I became President, we've increased funding for border security by 66 percent, and expanded the Border Patrol from about 9,000 to 12,000 agents. The men and women of our Border Patrol are doing a fine job in difficult circumstances, and over the past five years, they have apprehended and sent home about six million people entering America illegally.

 

Despite this progress, we do not yet have full control of the border, and I am determined to change that. Tonight I'm calling on Congress to provide funding for dramatic improvements in manpower and technology at the border. By the end of 2008, we'll increase the number of Border Patrol officers by an additional 6,000. When these new agents are deployed, we'll have more than doubled the size of the Border Patrol during my presidency.

 

At the same time, we're launching the most technologically advanced border security initiative in American history. We will construct high-tech fences in urban corridors, and build new patrol roads and barriers in rural areas. We'll employ motion sensors, infrared cameras, and unmanned aerial vehicles to prevent illegal crossings. America has the best technology in the world, and we will ensure that the Border Patrol has the technology they need to do their job and secure our border.

 

Training thousands of new Border Patrol agents and bringing the most advanced technology to the border will take time. Yet the need to secure our border is urgent. So I'm announcing several immediate steps to strengthen border enforcement during this period of transition:

 

One way to help during this transition is to use the National Guard. So, in coordination with governors, up to 6,000 Guard members will be deployed to our southern border. The Border Patrol will remain in the lead. The Guard will assist the Border Patrol by operating surveillance systems, analyzing intelligence, installing fences and vehicle barriers, building patrol roads, and providing training. Guard units will not be involved in direct law enforcement activities -- that duty will be done by the Border Patrol. This initial commitment of Guard members would last for a period of one year. After that, the number of Guard forces will be reduced as new Border Patrol agents and new technologies come online. It is important for Americans to know that we have enough Guard forces to win the war on terror, to respond to natural disasters, and to help secure our border.

 

The United States is not going to militarize the southern border. Mexico is our neighbor, and our friend. We will continue to work cooperatively to improve security on both sides of the border, to confront common problems like drug trafficking and crime, and to reduce illegal immigration.

 

Another way to help during this period of transition is through state and local law enforcement in our border communities. So we'll increase federal funding for state and local authorities assisting the Border Patrol on targeted enforcement missions. We will give state and local authorities the specialized training they need to help federal officers apprehend and detain illegal immigrants. State and local law enforcement officials are an important part of our border security and they need to be a part of our strategy to secure our borders.

 

The steps I've outlined will improve our ability to catch people entering our country illegally. At the same time, we must ensure that every illegal immigrant we catch crossing our southern border is returned home. More than 85 percent of the illegal immigrants we catch crossing the southern border are Mexicans, and most are sent back home within 24 hours. But when we catch illegal immigrants from other country [sic] it is not as easy to send them home. For many years, the government did not have enough space in our detention facilities to hold them while the legal process unfolded. So most were released back into our society and asked to return for a court date. When the date arrived, the vast majority did not show up. This practice, called "catch and release," is unacceptable, and we will end it.

 

We're taking several important steps to meet this goal. We've expanded the number of beds in our detention facilities, and we will continue to add more. We've expedited the legal process to cut the average deportation time. And we're making it clear to foreign governments that they must accept back their citizens who violate our immigration laws. As a result of these actions, we've ended "catch and release" for illegal immigrants from some countries. And I will ask Congress for additional funding and legal authority, so we can end "catch and release" at the southern border once and for all. When people know that they'll be caught and sent home if they enter our country illegally, they will be less likely to try to sneak in.

 

Second, to secure our border, we must create a temporary worker program. The reality is that there are many people on the other side of our border who will do anything to come to America to work and build a better life. They walk across miles of desert in the summer heat, or hide in the back of 18-wheelers to reach our country. This creates enormous pressure on our border that walls and patrols alone will not stop. To secure the border effectively, we must reduce the numbers of people trying to sneak across.

 

Therefore, I support a temporary worker program that would create a legal path for foreign workers to enter our country in an orderly way, for a limited period of time. This program would match willing foreign workers with willing American employers for jobs Americans are not doing. Every worker who applies for the program would be required to pass criminal background checks. And temporary workers must return to their home country at the conclusion of their stay.

 

A temporary worker program would meet the needs of our economy, and it would give honest immigrants a way to provide for their families while respecting the law. A temporary worker program would reduce the appeal of human smugglers, and make it less likely that people would risk their lives to cross the border. It would ease the financial burden on state and local governments, by replacing illegal workers with lawful taxpayers. And above all, a temporary worker program would add to our security by making certain we know who is in our country and why they are here.

 

Third, we need to hold employers to account for the workers they hire. It is against the law to hire someone who is in this country illegally. Yet businesses often cannot verify the legal status of their employees because of the widespread problem of document fraud. Therefore, comprehensive immigration reform must include a better system for verifying documents and work eligibility. A key part of that system should be a new identification card for every legal foreign worker. This card should use biometric technology, such as digital fingerprints, to make it tamper-proof. A tamper-proof card would help us enforce the law, and leave employers with no excuse for violating it. And by making it harder for illegal immigrants to find work in our country, we would discourage people from crossing the border illegally in the first place.

 

Fourth, we must face the reality that millions of illegal immigrants are here already. They should not be given an automatic path to citizenship. This is amnesty, and I oppose it. Amnesty would be unfair to those who are here lawfully, and it would invite further waves of illegal immigration.

 

Some in this country argue that the solution is to deport every illegal immigrant, and that any proposal short of this amounts to amnesty. I disagree. It is neither wise, nor realistic to round up millions of people, many with deep roots in the United States, and send them across the border. There is a rational middle ground between granting an automatic path to citizenship for every illegal immigrant, and a program of mass deportation. That middle ground recognizes there are differences between an illegal immigrant who crossed the border recently, and someone who has worked here for many years, and has a home, a family, and an otherwise clean record.

 

I believe that illegal immigrants who have roots in our country and want to stay should have to pay a meaningful penalty for breaking the law, to pay their taxes, to learn English, and to work in a job for a number of years. People who meet these conditions should be able to apply for citizenship, but approval would not be automatic, and they will have to wait in line behind those who played by the rules and followed the law. What I've just described is not amnesty, it is a way for those who have broken the law to pay their debt to society, and demonstrate the character that makes a good citizen.

 

Fifth, we must honor the great American tradition of the melting pot, which has made us one nation out of many peoples. The success of our country depends upon helping newcomers assimilate into our society, and embrace our common identity as Americans. Americans are bound together by our shared ideals, an appreciation of our history, respect for the flag we fly, and an ability to speak and write the English language. English is also the key to unlocking the opportunity of America. English allows newcomers to go from picking crops to opening a grocery, from cleaning offices to running offices, from a life of low-paying jobs to a diploma, a career, and a home of their own. When immigrants assimilate and advance in our society, they realize their dreams, they renew our spirit, and they add to the unity of America.

 

Tonight, I want to speak directly to members of the House and the Senate: An immigration reform bill needs to be comprehensive, because all elements of this problem must be addressed together, or none of them will be solved at all. The House has passed an immigration bill. The Senate should act by the end of this month so we can work out the differences between the two bills, and Congress can pass a comprehensive bill for me to sign into law.

 

America needs to conduct this debate on immigration in a reasoned and respectful tone. Feelings run deep on this issue, and as we work it out, all of us need to keep some things in mind. We cannot build a unified country by inciting people to anger, or playing on anyone's fears, or exploiting the issue of immigration for political gain. We must always remember that real lives will be affected by our debates and decisions, and that every human being has dignity and value no matter what their citizenship papers say.

 

I know many of you listening tonight have a parent or a grandparent who came here from another country with dreams of a better life. You know what freedom meant to them, and you know that America is a more hopeful country because of their hard work and sacrifice. As President, I've had the opportunity to meet people of many backgrounds, and hear what America means to them. On a visit to Bethesda Naval Hospital, Laura and I met a wounded Marine named Guadalupe Denogean. Master Gunnery Sergeant Denogean came to the United States from Mexico when he was a boy. He spent his summers picking crops with his family, and then he volunteered for the United States Marine Corps as soon as he was able. During the liberation of Iraq, Master Gunnery Sergeant Denogean was seriously injured. And when asked if he had any requests, he made two: a promotion for the corporal who helped rescue him, and the chance to become an American citizen. And when this brave Marine raised his right hand, and swore an oath to become a citizen of the country he had defended for more than 26 years, I was honored to stand at his side.

 

We will always be proud to welcome people like Guadalupe Denogean as fellow Americans. Our new immigrants are just what they've always been -- people willing to risk everything for the dream of freedom. And America remains what she has always been: the great hope on the horizon, an open door to the future, a blessed and promised land. We honor the heritage of all who come here, no matter where they come from, because we trust in our country's genius for making us all Americans -- one nation under God.

 

Thank you, and good night.

 

END 8:18 P.M. EDT

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Luke_Wilbur    5

This was the failure of the leader not the failure of a mission. From reading your post the death of Esequiel Hernandez, Jr. was an accidental homicide. I can promise you that there will be no mission to capture American citizens of Hispanic/Latino descent. The death of Esequiel Hernandez will be remembered with the respect that it deserves and a lesson for future military and civilian operations.

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Guest BlingBling   
Guest BlingBling

I hope everyone here knows the real truth. George Bush is throwing a bone out to the conservative white, I mean right wing. Our military is being stretched way to thin for political points. I cannot wait until any Democrat is put into office.

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Guest TO pinche tejano   
Guest TO pinche tejano

I was interested in this when I started reading this, but in no way do you know why these Marines were following this man. I feel bad for what happened if he were innocent as you say. But for one they are following the orders of the DOD or government as you might know. Why would they walk up and say can we have permission to look around. No of course not, thier permission comes from a much higher ground. You said he shot in the opposite directions of the marines. What the heck was he shooting at. I know you feel like they shouldnt of been there. But its not like the Marine Corps picked a random person and went hunting for him. They didnt get punished you say, its because they were ordered to do whatever they were doing out there from a higher command. If he was a rancher and saw the marines why would he try to shoot 3 rounds you say. I would say hold up and put my weapon in the air. And no offense but these marines were 200 yards away he wouldnt have got 3 shots off. One shot, one kill he would have been down at that close range. Which only makes me think one thing, he fired first.

 

You act like you were there first hand and you know everything you are saying is right. I wasnt there and I dont know if I am right. Seems just a little biased here to me that is all. By the way there are Rules of Engagment, look them up. They were shot at with hostile intentions, I dont know what else you need to decide to fire back. What if the young man got lucky and hit one of the marines. Than what would you say. I feel bad and hope this doesnt happen again. But dont use complete biased opinions over this matter.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

WoW!!! I'm a white guy?, and how come no one tells me these things? Geeees!!!! now according to you Blingbling do I have to renounce that I am Latino as well???

 

BlingBling, what does your side "The democrats" offer my group "Latino's"?

 

Separation Under the Guidance of the Democrats where my group NEVER has to learn English so your side could better control my group?<~~~~ is this what you are offering my group?

 

BlingBling it probably never dawned on you that the ones pushing for border security can be Latino's such as myself "Human".

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I hope everyone here knows the real truth. George Bush is throwing a bone out to the conservative white, I mean right wing. Our military is being stretched way to thin for political points. I cannot wait until any Democrat is put into office.

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Guest human_*   
Guest human_*

Lets put this in context; Just so everyone knows.

 

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060521/ap_on_...ting_immigrants

 

By MARK STEVENSON, Associated Press Writer Sun May 21, 4:25 PM ET

 

MEXICO CITY - If

 

Arnold Schwarzenegger had migrated to Mexico instead of the United States, he couldn't be a governor. If Argentina native Sergio Villanueva, firefighter hero of the Sept. 11 attacks, had moved to Tecate instead of New York, he wouldn't have been allowed on the force.

 

Even as Mexico presses the United States to grant unrestricted citizenship to millions of undocumented Mexican migrants, its officials at times calling U.S. policies "xenophobic," Mexico places daunting limitations on anyone born outside its territory.

In the United States, only two posts — the presidency and vice presidency — are reserved for the native born.

In Mexico, non-natives are banned from those and thousands of other jobs, even if they are legal, naturalized citizens.

Foreign-born Mexicans can't hold seats in either house of the congress. They're also banned from state legislatures, the Supreme Court and all governorships. Many states ban foreign-born Mexicans from spots on town councils. And Mexico's Constitution reserves almost all federal posts, and any position in the military and merchant marine, for "native-born Mexicans."

 

Recently the Mexican government has gone even further. Since at least 2003, it has encouraged cities to ban non-natives from such local jobs as firefighters, police and judges.

Mexico's Interior Department — which recommended the bans as part of "model" city statutes it distributed to local officials — could cite no basis for extending the bans to local posts.

 

After being contacted by The Associated Press about the issue, officials changed the wording in two statutes to delete the "native-born" requirements, although they said the modifications had nothing to do with AP's inquiries.

 

"These statutes have been under review for some time, and they have, or are about to be, changed," said an Interior Department official, who was not authorized to be quoted by name.

But because the "model" statues are fill-in-the-blanks guides for framing local legislation, many cities across Mexico have already enacted such bans. They have done so even though foreigners constitute a tiny percentage of the population and pose little threat to Mexico's job market.

 

The foreign-born make up just 0.5 percent of Mexico's 105 million people, compared with about 13 percent in the United States, which has a total population of 299 million. Mexico grants citizenship to about 3,000 people a year, compared to the U.S. average of almost a half million.

 

"There is a need for a little more openness, both at the policy level and in business affairs," said David Kim, president of the Mexico-Korea Association, which represents the estimated 20,000 South Koreans in Mexico, many of them naturalized citizens.

 

"The immigration laws are very difficult ... and they put obstacles in the way that make it more difficult to compete," Kim said, although most foreigners don't come to Mexico seeking government posts.

 

J. Michael Waller, of the Center for Security Policy in Washington, was more blunt. "If American policy-makers are looking for legal models on which to base new laws restricting immigration and expelling foreign lawbreakers, they have a handy guide: the Mexican constitution," he said in a recent article on immigration.

Some Mexicans agree their country needs to change.

 

"This country needs to be more open," said Francisco Hidalgo, a 50-year-old video producer. "In part to modernize itself, and in part because of the contribution these (foreign-born) people could make."

Others express a more common view, a distrust of foreigners that academics say is rooted in Mexico's history of foreign invasions and the loss of territory in the 1847-48 Mexican-American War.

 

Speaking of the hundreds of thousands of Central Americans who enter Mexico each year, chauffeur Arnulfo Hernandez, 57, said: "The ones who want to reach the United States, we should send them up there. But the ones who want to stay here, it's usually for bad reasons, because they want to steal or do drugs."

Some say progress is being made.

 

Mexico's president no longer is required to be at least a second-generation native-born. That law was changed in 1999 to clear the way for candidates who have one foreign-born parent, like President

 

Vicente Fox, whose mother is from Spain.

But the pace of change is slow. The state of Baja California still requires candidates for the state legislature to prove both their parents were native born.

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quite right. What part of "illegal" doesn't bush rummy colin condaleeza libby delay rove abu gitmo

 

...uh....what were we talking about again?

http://www.cafepress.com/reconquistador

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Guest U.S. Senator Joseph Biden   
Guest U.S. Senator Joseph Biden

I supported this bill because it was the best option available to deal with our growing immigration problem,” said Senator Biden. “This was the only bill that adequately addressed all three pieces: mandating tough border security; tightening our temporary guest worker program; and finding a humane and reasonable way to deal with the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants living and working in the United States.

 

First and foremost, this bill enhances our control over the border, allowing us to better deal with future illegal immigrants as well as drug traffickers and potential terrorists. It also provides for the construction of over 350 miles of triple fences in targeted urban border areas, and creates a virtual fence with ground sensors and digital cameras from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean.

 

Secondly, the bill recognizes the fact that there are an estimated 11 million people here illegally -- 1.6 million of whom are children. Mass deportation is not a realistic answer. This bill sets out a rigorous path to earned legalization including requiring the individual to show continuous employment; undergoing security and criminal background checks; submitting to a medical exam; learning English and U.S. civics and, paying back taxes and penalty fees.

 

And lastly, the bill institutes a rational and limited guest worker program with an electronic verification system for employers. Under its provisions, an employer could only hire a guest worker if the guest worker has a tamper-proof identification card and the employer can demonstrate that no American could be hired to do the job. If employers violated these terms, they would be subject to criminal prosecution.

 

The Senate bill certainly isn’t perfect, but it strikes the right balance – it’s tough, but it’s fair too.

 

Senator Biden, along with a coalition of Democrats and Republicans, fought back against amendments aimed to derail the package, which, in the coming months, will undergo arduous negotiations to reconcile vastly different immigration packages passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate.

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Human    0

Thanks for the update.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I supported this bill because it was the best option available to deal with our growing immigration problem,” said Senator Biden. “This was the only bill that adequately addressed all three pieces: mandating tough border security; tightening our temporary guest worker program; and finding a humane and reasonable way to deal with the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants living and working in the United States.

 

First and foremost, this bill enhances our control over the border, allowing us to better deal with future illegal immigrants as well as drug traffickers and potential terrorists. It also provides for the construction of over 350 miles of triple fences in targeted urban border areas, and creates a virtual fence with ground sensors and digital cameras from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean.

 

Secondly, the bill recognizes the fact that there are an estimated 11 million people here illegally -- 1.6 million of whom are children. Mass deportation is not a realistic answer. This bill sets out a rigorous path to earned legalization including requiring the individual to show continuous employment; undergoing security and criminal background checks; submitting to a medical exam; learning English and U.S. civics and, paying back taxes and penalty fees.

 

And lastly, the bill institutes a rational and limited guest worker program with an electronic verification system for employers. Under its provisions, an employer could only hire a guest worker if the guest worker has a tamper-proof identification card and the employer can demonstrate that no American could be hired to do the job. If employers violated these terms, they would be subject to criminal prosecution.

 

The Senate bill certainly isn’t perfect, but it strikes the right balance – it’s tough, but it’s fair too.

 

Senator Biden, along with a coalition of Democrats and Republicans, fought back against amendments aimed to derail the package, which, in the coming months, will undergo arduous negotiations to reconcile vastly different immigration packages passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate.

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Guest Jerod Husvar   
Guest Jerod Husvar

I'm sorry, but the sad fact is that most people who are so enthusiastically against immigration, legal or otherwise, is because of bigotry. My fellow white people had best learn some tolerance, we're not going to be the majority forever and we better learn to get along with EVERYONE before everyone decides to pay back in kind.

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Guest human   
Guest human

Just a Theory;

 

Are you sure that I am Anglo? I could be an African American who does not like Hispanics, or I could be a Hispanic who does not like other Hispanics Endorsing Human Trafficking of other Hispanics.

 

Online ANYONE can be whom they choose to be.

Union democrats can post online as Republicans who dislike illegal immigration. Who view illegal immigration as a threat to there power.

 

Democrats in general can post Now that they are for illegal immigration since it means that

The majority of those here illegally will vote democrat, and thus support union causes.

 

Then it could be that Others' view it as a loophole to Nafta in terms of Internal National Security.

 

Win! Win! huh?

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm sorry, but the sad fact is that most people who are so enthusiastically against immigration, legal or otherwise, is because of bigotry. My fellow white people had best learn some tolerance, we're not going to be the majority forever and we better learn to get along with EVERYONE before everyone decides to pay back in kind.

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