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The National Building Museum Vincent Scully Prize

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Guest National Building Museum

The National Building Museum today announces it will present the Vincent Scully Prize to His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales. The award recognizes The Prince's long-standing interest in the built environment and commitment to creating urban areas with human scale.

 

The November 3, 2005 ceremony at the National Building Museum will feature a

talk by His Royal Highness and will be part of the first official visit to the

U.S. by both Their Royal Highnesses The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of

Cornwall.

"Through his speeches, publications and charitable foundations, The Prince

of Wales has articulated the need for balanced growth of cities, promoted

traditional town planning, and elevated public awareness of architecture,"

said Scully Prize Jury Chairman David Schwarz. "The National Building Museum

is honored to present His Royal Highness with the Vincent Scully Prize."

The Vincent Scully Prize was established in 1999 to recognize exemplary

practice, scholarship or criticism in architecture, historic preservation and

urban design. The Prize ceremony will include a tribute by former Scully

Prize recipient Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, followed by the presentation of the

Prize by Vincent Scully and a talk by The Prince of Wales. National Building

Museum guests will be attending the free event, which is sold out.

In addition to advocacy on behalf of the built environment, The Prince of

Wales has established charities that support work related to the built

environment. The Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment teaches the

principles of traditional urban design as key to creating healthy and

prosperous communities that improve the quality of people's lives. The

Foundation is involved in approximately 20 projects ranging from regeneration,

to urban extensions, and brownfield developments. These projects create living

examples of sustainable communities and educate professionals through

practice-based learning. The Prince's Regeneration Trust promotes the rescue

and regeneration of redundant buildings of historic and architectural

importance.

The Prince's School of Traditional Arts aims to teach arts and crafts

skills which have profound roots in all the major faith traditions, and offers

courses such as geometry, Islamic architecture, icon painting, tilemaking,

Islimi/Arabesque, stained glass, and mosaic craft.

In conjunction with the Prize ceremony, the National Building Museum will

present two public exhibitions organized by The Prince's Foundation for the

Built Environment and The Prince's School of Traditional Arts. Both

exhibitions, located in second-floor galleries, will be open to guests

attending the ceremony and then to the public from November 5, 2005 through

January 8, 2006. The Foundation's exhibition, titled Civitas: Traditional

Urbanism in Contemporary Practice, considers the principles underpinning the

traditional urbanism movement by showcasing 17 groundbreaking examples of

urban development from around the world. The exhibition illustrates the

challenges, solutions, and methodologies of these projects, and how they can

provide the key to turning government policy for future developments into the

reality of flourishing settlements. The second exhibition, A Building

Tradition: The Work of the Prince's School of Traditional Arts, presents

exemplary works created by students, alumni, and staff of The Prince's School

of Traditional Arts. The School's curriculum includes courses in geometry,

Islamic architecture, icon painting, tilemaking, Islimi/Arabesque, stained

glass, and mosaic craft.

The National Building Museum established the Vincent Scully Prize in 1999

to honor Professor Scully's work and extend his legacy. Scully is the Sterling

Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at Yale University and Distinguished

Visiting Professor at the University of Miami. He was the first prize

recipient and has been followed by Jane Jacobs, Andres Duany and Elizabeth

Plater-Zyberk, Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, and His Highness the Aga

Khan. The Prince of Wales is the sixth recipient. A jury composed of

Chairman David Schwarz, Carolyn Brody, chair of the Museum's Board of

Trustees, Robert Peck, Samina Quraeshi, and Robert A. M. Stern selects prize

laureates.

Celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2005, the National Building Museum is

America's premier cultural institution dedicated to exploring and celebrating

architecture, design, engineering, construction, and planning. Chartered by

Congress in 1980 and open to the public since 1985, the Museum has become a

vital forum for exchanging ideas and information about the built environment

through its exhibitions, education programs, and publications. The Museum is

located at 401 F Street NW, Washington, D.C. Museum hours are Monday through

Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 11 am to 5 pm. Admission is free.

Museum Shop. Cafe. Public inquiries: 202.272.2448 or visit http://www.nbm.org.

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