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U.S. - China relations

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Among credible writers who cover U.S.-China relations, we can identify Michael Pillsbury, an author of two books on China, available at National Defense University Press:

1. China Debates the Future Security Environment (This book has been translated and published in China by the New China News Agency).

2. Chinese Views of Future Warfare

 

For more information on Michael Pillsbury, please visit Michael Pillsbury's website.

 

 

:o

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Guest FMPRC

China is strongly dissatisfied with and opposed to the US decision of selling the long-range early warning radar system to Taiwan.

 

This act seriously breaches the principles of the Three Joint Communiqués, and in particular, the 8.17 Communiqué and sends a wrong signal to the Taiwan independent forces. Such an act would only aggravate tensions in the Taiwan Straits and undermine shared interests of the two countries.

 

The question of Taiwan remains as the most important and sensitive issue at the core of the China-US relations. As this question bears on China's sovereignty and territorial integrity, we will allow no external forces to take actions that might damage the core interest of China. We strongly urge the United States to cancel its wrong decisions, so as not to endanger peace and stability in areas across the Taiwan Straits and preserve the China-US cooperation.

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Guest LAW

President Hu and President Obama met for about an hour and a half yesturday afternoon. This is the fourth time they’ve met. They met earlier in London, in New York, and numerous meetings in Beijing during the visit. They last spoke on the phone on the 1st. I would describe the tone of today’s conversation as positive and constructive. It was a meeting without talking points -- a conversation between two leaders who are familiar and comfortable talking with each other about bilateral relations and where they stand.

 

The two Presidents discussed ways to expand our interests and responsibilities in dealing with global challenges, in particular non-proliferation and the global economic recovery. They agreed that the U.S. and China need to take concrete actions on these issues to underpin our development of a partnership.

 

Specifically on non-proliferation, much of the discussion of the meeting focused on Iran. The issue was discussed at length. The Chinese very clearly share our concern about the Iranian nuclear program. They share our overall goal of preservation of the non-proliferation regime. The U.S. and China, along with other members of the P5-plus-1, are united in our dual-track approach to the Iran nuclear issue.

 

During the meeting President Obama and Hu underscored their agreement that Iran must meet its international nuclear non-proliferation obligations. The two Presidents agreed to instruct their delegations to work with the P5-plus-1 and U.N. Security Council representatives on a sanctions resolution. The resolution will make clear to Iran the costs of pursuing a nuclear program that violates Iran’s obligations and responsibilities.

 

The discussion was as sign of international unity on Iran. The Chinese are actively at the table in New York in discussions with Ambassador Rice, as well as the other (inaudible) the P5-plus-1. The meeting today is another sign of international unity on this issue. It’s also I think a strong indication of the way in which the U.S. and China are working together in a positive way on Iran and other issues.

 

The other issue that occupied obviously discussion was the economic situation, the global economic situation. The President reaffirmed his view that it is important for a global and sustained -- sustained and balanced global economic recovery that China move toward a more market-oriented exchange rate -- would have to be an essential contribution to that objective.

 

The President also noted his concern over some market access issues, market access barriers, in China and the need to address them as part of the rebalancing effort. That's all I'll say by way of introduction.

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Guest LAW

Press Briefing by Jeff Bader, NSC Senior Director for Asian Affairs

 

Via Conference Call

 

4:32 P.M. EDT

 

 

MR. GIBBS: Let’s do a couple questions, but we've got to go because we’re late.

 

Q Just a real quick one. To be clear, the Chinese have given their commitment to some form of sanctions? Is that the takeaway from this?

 

MR. BADER: The Chinese agreed that -- the two Presidents agreed that the two delegations should work on a sanctions resolution in New York, and that's what we’re doing.

 

Q But they haven’t agreed to anything specific yet?

 

MR. BADER: We are going to be -- we’ve started to work that and we’re going to be working on that in the coming days -- coming days and weeks.

 

Q Any sense on timing on that -- weeks instead of months?

 

MR. RHODES: I can say, Jeff, first, that you’ve heard the President say that we expect a resolution this spring, which will be a matter of weeks. And so he believes that we need to move forward with urgency to get that done.

 

Jeff can speak to the Chinese part of this. I'll just say that President Medvedev and President Obama both, I think you saw, shared a sense of an agreement about the need for strong sanctions and urgency about moving forward. But, Jeff, do you want to speak to the Chinese piece of this?

 

MR. BADER: I'd just say that the President in the meeting made clear the sense of urgency, and the Chinese made clear that they are prepared to work with us.

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Guest James Petras Ph.D.

China does little to directly constrain US overseas expansion, (since Washington does a good job at self-destruction) rather it focuses on enhancing its own economic based strategy of increasing overseas investments, borrowing technology and upgrading its high tech industries. China, despite pressure from Washington, refuses to join its sanctions campaign against Iran and develops investment ties in Afghanistan while the US military occupation costs billions and alienates most Afghans including its client regime . China refuses to lend support to Obama’s military centered strategy to buttress the empire.While attending “summits” and bilateral conferences it refuses to make concessions which prejudice its overseas markets, without directly confronting the military mission promoted by Obama.

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Guest Big Think

Former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO, General Wesley Clark, says the United States does not know whether China is leading an effort to build a nuclear submarine fleet to rival that of the U.S., but one thing is for sure—both China's military capabilities and its economy are growing and that's causing the international community to consider a future world in which China will return to its rightful place as the "the center of humanity."

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Guest Luke

Relations are tense with the United States and China.

 

http://www.fmprc.govspam/eng/xwfw/s2510/t764503.htm

 

On the afternoon of October 26, 2010, Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Ma Zhaoxu held a regular press conference.

 

Q: It is reported that Chinese fishery administration ships and Japanese patrol boats confronted each other in the waters off the Diaoyu Island lately. Is this a move by China to assert sovereignty towards Japan? Besides, the new Commander of US Forces in Japan has recently emphasized that the Japan-US alliance should be strengthened. How do you comment?

 

A: On your first question, the waters off the Diaoyu Island are traditional fishing grounds for Chinese fishermen. China dispatches fishery law-enforcement ships to relevant waters to cruise and protect fishery activities based upon needs and in accordance with relevant Chinese laws and regulations.

 

On your second question, as a bilateral arrangement, the Japan-US alliance should not harm the interests of any other countries including China. We hope that the development of Japan-US relations will play a positive and constructive role for peace and stability of the region.

 

Q: It is reported that China has recently halted export of rare earth to the US and Japan. What is the reason for that? When will the export resume?

 

A: It is China's sovereign rights to manage and control rare earth resources, which is also in line with relevant WTO regulations and conforms to China's WTO commitments. It's a common practice of all countries to restrict exports of key natural resources. Allegations against China in this regard are unreasonable. You may refer to competent Chinese authorities for specific information.

 

Q: It is reported that the ROK and the US have cancelled a joint military exercise in the Yellow Sea which was scheduled to take place later this month. How do you comment?

 

A: We have noted relevant reports and hope parties involved work to maintain peace and stability of the region.

 

Q: First, it's said that Premier Wen Jiabao and Indian Prime Minister Singh plan to meet on the sidelines of the ASEAN Summit. Can you disclose the agenda of the meeting? Will the discussion cover China's visa policy toward residents of the India-held Kashmir? Second, Indian media says that Premier Wen is going to visit India later this year. Please confirm.

 

A: On your first question, China and India are staying in close communication on the issue. Once there's any update, information will be released in due course. China's visa policy toward residents of the India-held Kashmir is consistent and remains unchanged.

 

On your second question, I don't have information in this regard so far.

 

Q: During the recent Tokyo Film Festival, the two sides across the Taiwan Straits disputed over the name under which Taiwan participates. With the two sides gradually moving ahead along the road of peaceful development, is the Chinese Foreign Ministry still "blocking" Taiwan's participation in international organizations, activities and conferences?

 

A: You used the word "blocking" in your question, which I think is your personal understanding.

 

We have noted relevant reports. On the question of Taiwan's participation in international activities, our principled position is that reasonable and rational arrangements can be made through pragmatic consultation between the two sides across the Taiwan Straits under the precondition of not creating "two Chinas" or "one China, one Taiwan".

 

Q: Indian Prime Minister Singh discussed relations with China in a meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Kan during his visit to Japan. The two leaders agreed on the need to engage and actively develop relations with China. How do you comment?

 

A: We don't comment on the meetings between foreign leaders. Our policy to develop friendly relations of cooperation with India will not change. At the same time, we are committed to improving and developing relations with Japan.

 

Q: The Chinese Government is holding activities to commemorate the 60th anniversary of participation in the Korean War these days and sent a high-level military delegation to the DPRK to take part in its commemoration activities. Are these moves a response to Japan and the US strengthening their alliance?

 

A: A symposium was held in Beijing yesterday to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Chinese People's Volunteers entering the DPRK to help in the war to resist US aggression. Xi Jinping, Member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee, Vice President of China and Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC) delivered an important speech on behalf of the CPC Central Committee, the State Council and the CMC.

 

I would like to emphasize that as a peace-loving nation, China is ready to develop friendly relations and cooperation with all countries in the world and actively contribute to peace and stability of the region and the world on the basis of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence.

 

Q: It is reported that the DPRK Ambassador to China left his post on October 23 and his successor will arrive in China soon. Please confirm.

 

A: It is learned that Ambassador Choe Pyong Gwan has returned to the DPRK. Mr. Ji Jae Ryong, the new DPRK Ambassador to China arrived in Beijing today.

 

Q: How will China cooperate with France in financial and other fields at the G20 Seoul Summit?

 

A: China and France have cooperated actively and constructively within the framework of Group 20. At the upcoming Seoul Summit, I believe the two countries will continue to have close contact and consultation on a variety of topics on the agenda, including fiscal and financial issues.

 

Q: Will Premier Wen Jiabao meet with his Japanese counterpart on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit meetings?

 

A: We hope Japan take concrete action to create necessary conditions and atmosphere for leaders' meeting between the two countries.

 

Q: Has China and Zambia held diplomatic consultations over the Zambian mine conflict? What are the latest developments?

 

A: Thanks to the concerted efforts of relevant parties, the Zambian mine conflict has generally calmed down. The Zambian side is now conducting full investigation of the incident.

 

Amid the rapid development of China-Africa economic cooperation and trade, it is common that problems may arise. I believe the two sides can solve them in timely manner through friendly consultation. The Chinese Government will continue to urge Chinese companies and personnel in Africa to abide by laws, follow regulations in their business operations and conduct cooperation with African countries based on the principles of equality, mutual benefits and joint development.

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Guest wiki

The Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence or Panchsheel are a series of agreements between the People's Republic of China and India. It was formed in 1954, within the context of decolonization, to ensure that newly independent nations would not have the same aggressive relationship they once had with colonizers. The 5 principles called the panchsheel, which form the basis of the Non-Aligned movement, were laid down by Jawaharlal Nehru. This narrow agreement between India, PRC spurred the Asian-African Conference, whose ten principles expanded on the Five Principles below:

 

1. Mutual respect for each other's territorial integrity and sovereignty (互相尊重主权和领土完整)

2. Mutual non-aggression against anyone. (互不侵犯)

3. Mutual non-interference in each other's internal affairs (互不干涉内政)

4. Equality and mutual benefit (平等互利)

5. Peaceful co-existence (和平共处)

 

The Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence were first put forth by India at the start of negotiations that took place in Delhi from December 1953 to April 1954 between the Delegation of the PRC Government and the Delegation of the Indian Government on the relations between the two countries with respect to disputed territory.

 

Later, the Five Principles were formally written into the preface to the "Agreement Between the People's Republic of China and the Republic of India on Trade and co-operation Between the PRC and India" concluded between the two sides. Since June 1954, the Five Principles have been adopted in many other international documents. As norms of relations between nations, they have become widely recognized and accepted throughout the region

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Guest Brit

Well number 2 has been broken. China's sprawling intelligence agencies work hand in hand with the Chinese academic institutions and industry to steal industrial secrets and intellectual property of American companies.

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I would like to know what happened to Beijing's promise of a peaceful rise. Reading what Adm. Robert Willard, commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, had to say about China makes me think peace is not part of the plan.

 

http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201012270241.html

 

 

Q: In March, you told the Senate Armed Services Committee, "China's rapid and comprehensive transformation of its armed forces is affecting regional military balances." Could you elaborate on how China's military expansion is affecting the regional military balance?

 

A: Two ways. In one sense, the tremendous advancement in China's military itself is shifting the overall balance of military powers in the region. It's been rare in history that any country underpinned by the kind of economic power that China possesses has developed its military so rapidly.

 

But at the same time, the other countries in the Asia-Pacific region that are troubled by and uncertain of China's intentions are also advancing their own military capabilities, and this is particularly true in the acquisition of submarines and advanced aircraft.

 

 

http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201012270241.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: In 1996, China launched missiles over Taiwan to influence its election; the United States sent two carrier battle groups close to Taiwan. Some experts say the United States cannot do that anymore unless you are ready to take a lot of risks because of China's A2/AD capabilities. Is it a fair statement to say you have to run much bigger risks to conduct the same kind of operations near Taiwan now compared with 1996?

 

A: The anti-access/area denial capabilities, fully employed, will present a challenge to military operations in the region. That will have to be overcome.

 

 

http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201012270241.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What is the main concern that the United States has for the South China Sea? Is it that the freedom of navigation along the sea lines of communication (SLOCs) would be jeopardized or is it that the South China Sea would be turned into what they call a "bastion" for China's nuclear submarines equipped to launch ballistic missiles (SSBNs)?

 

A: It's very much the sea lines of communication, the fact that this region of the world carries about something in excess of $5 trillion annually of commerce, $1.3 trillion of annual trade for the United States. Those sea lines of communication are exceedingly vital. They're a national interest to the United States. I would offer they're a national interest to Japan. And their safety is a major concern.

 

The idea that any nation would become overly assertive in terms of its claims or in terms of its relative influence in the South China Sea, at the expense of the other nations who have that same commercial interest, is the issue at hand.

 

 

http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201012270241.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What do you think is China's strategy beyond Taiwan? Do you think they're just pursuing sea control out to the second island chain or do you think they seek a larger strategic goal, even global hegemony?

 

A: I think China has global aspirations, and economically, socially, diplomatically and militarily, they are focused presently on what they term their "near seas"--the Bohai, Yellow Sea, South China Sea, East China Sea. They are interested in minimizing foreign military influence in that region, and that's what we see occurring.

 

I think they have an interest in being able to influence beyond that point, and they have aspirations to eventually become a global military. In the capabilities that we're seeing develop, that is fairly obvious.

 

 

http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201012270241.html

 

 

 

How can we do business with a nation that is looking like it is preparing for war?

 

 

 

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Guest human

http://www.boston.com/business/articles/2011/01/08/china_opens_door_to_us_banks_to_form_securities_ventures/

 

I can see the profit in that, and since we do have a stock market wouldn't you then agree that shorting the dollar is a pretty good bet?

 

China is an Economic Super Power now.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/47908/

 

Nothing more needs to be said.

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Guest Fedup

http://www.boston.com/business/articles/2011/01/08/china_opens_door_to_us_banks_to_form_securities_ventures/

 

I can see the profit in that, and since we do have a stock market wouldn't you then agree that shorting the dollar is a pretty good bet?

 

China is an Economic Super Power now.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Goldman Sachs = Gao Hua Securities

JPMorgan = First Capital Securities Co.

Morgan Stanley = Huaxin Securities Co Ltd = China Fortune Securities Co Ltd.

 

This really pisses me off. How are these banks allowed to hide in the shadows with these hedge funds? Thanks Human for enlightening me on now seeing all the TARP money we gave these crooked banks is now going straight to China and our government has lost all power to stop them.

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Guest Alfred.Brock

Now that William Daley, a top executive at JP Morgan Chase is the White House Chief of Staff it is no wonder these business deals have been given a little grease by the Chinese Communists. Now they have connections directly into the White House that most Americans are denied.

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I am also not worried that the Chinese have a new Stealth jet or a carrier missile killing system. I am worried who they plan to sell it to and we are losing more and more power to do anything about it.

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Guest Concerned

China has historically relied arms trade as leverage to obtain concessions. That coupled with the amount of debt we owe them makes this quite dangerous.

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Guest RFerley

I see the Chinese Military, much like their technology, and aeronautics and space industry, growing immensely in the next two decades. Every year they put out knowledge hungry young adults that are truly unrivaled in their pursuit of mastering subjects like mathematics, engineering, and science. The 2009 results of the PISA international exam should keep our educators up at night pulling their hair out. The students from Shanghai, Taiwan, and Korea completely demolished their international competitors (including America's best and brightest youth) and blew out Finland the west’s best example of stellar education. It absolutely makes me cringe to admit this, but the Chinese Dragon has been let loose and unfortunately with their tenacious pursue of education as ingrained in them by their parents and their Confucius ideals, it will take major educational reform to keep up with this emerging powerhouse; much less have any real competitive rivalry with them. We need immediate change not only in the school system but also at home. Children are a product of the environment in which they're raised and if we want to maintain our influence and standing in the world today this change needs to start immediately and it needs to start at home with the parents.

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Guest LAW

US Defense Secretary Gates Arrived in China reduce the chances of miscommunication, misunderstanding or miscalculation.

 

Opening Statement by Secretary Robert Gates during Joint Press Conference with General Liang Guanglie from Beijing, China

 

“It is a pleasure to be back in Beijing. I’d like to thank the government and people of China for their gracious hospitality, which I’ve greatly enjoyed since my first visit almost 30 years ago. Much has changed since then.

 

“I also want to thank Gen. Liang for his hospitality. He and I had a great deal to discuss in our meetings earlier today. Both President Obama and President Hu have stressed that building a sustained and reliable relationship between our two militaries is an indispensible part of strengthening our two nations’ broader relationship -- a relationship that consists of deepening economic and cultural ties that touch the lives of virtually all our citizens.

 

“Among these are:

 

* Improving maritime security;

* Addressing the challenges posed by the spread of nuclear-, space-, cyber-, and missile technology;

* Maintaining peace and security on the Korean Peninsula by facilitating engagement between the two Koreas and towards the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula;

* Preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon by continuing to work through the dual-track approach; and finally

* Continuing to cooperate generally to diffuse global conflicts and tensions.

 

“I’ve stressed several times the importance of maintaining an ongoing military-to-military dialogue between the United States and the People’s Republic of China. Mechanisms such as the Defense Consultative Talks, the Defense Policy Coordination Talks, and the Military Maritime Consultative Agreement can serve as important channels of communication in this regard.

 

“As Gen. Liang mentioned in his statement, we have agreed to pursue now seven priority areas of cooperation which were agreed to in October 2009. The general and I have also agreed to establish a working group that will develop a new framework for improving ties between the U.S. and Chinese military establishments. This group will meet several times during the coming year, and will present the framework during the 2011 Defense Consultative Talks. We also agreed to hold working group meetings under the Military Maritime Consultative Agreement to discuss future operational safety and to build cooperation in the maritime domain.

 

“As Gen. Liang mentioned in his statement, we agreed to look into a number of joint military activities ranging from maritime search and rescue to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, counter-piracy, counterterrorism, and more. Not only will joint exercises improve certain key capabilities on both sides they also will lead to safer practices for our sea and air forces, and, over time, cultivate trust and lead to more opportunities for defense cooperation. We are in strong agreement. In order to reduce the chances of miscommunication, misunderstanding, or miscalculation, it is important that our military-to-military ties are solid, consistent, and not subject to shifting political winds.

 

“Finally, I was pleased that Gen. Liang noted and said that the Chinese side would consider and study the beginning of a strategic security dialogue -- as part of a broader Strategic and Economic Dialogue -- that covers nuclear, missile defense, space, and cyber issues.

 

“Cultivating personal relationships can be an important part of improving understanding and cooperation. In that vein, Adm. Mullen and I will be pleased to welcome the Chief of the General Staff of the PLA to visit the United States in the first half of this year. And, of course, we are very much looking forward to President Hu’s state visit to Washington next week.

 

“The next two days will provide further opportunities for dialogue with my Chinese colleagues. They include:

 

* Meetings later today with Vice President Xi, the Vice Chairmen of the Central Military Commission followed by an official banquet tonight;

* Discussions with the Minister of Foreign Affairs and with President Hu Jintao tomorrow; and

* On Wednesday, a visit to the PLA’s Second Artillery Corps, the latter providing a key opportunity to advance our discussion of nuclear strategy.

 

“China and the United States are two of the world’s great powers and we both recognize the responsibilities and opportunities that status entails -- including showing the rest of the world the benefits that arise when great nations cooperate on matters of shared interests. Our two nations now have an extraordinary opportunity to define the relationship not by the obstacles that at times divide us, but by the opportunities that exist to foster greater cooperation and bring us closer together.”

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Guest HUMAN

Give it up Lawlet. I already have this web site flagged.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

US Defense Secretary Gates Arrived in China reduce the chances of miscommunication, misunderstanding or miscalculation.

 

Opening Statement by Secretary Robert Gates during Joint Press Conference with General Liang Guanglie from Beijing, China

 

“It is a pleasure to be back in Beijing. I’d like to thank the government and people of China for their gracious hospitality, which I’ve greatly enjoyed since my first visit almost 30 years ago. Much has changed since then.

 

“I also want to thank Gen. Liang for his hospitality. He and I had a great deal to discuss in our meetings earlier today. Both President Obama and President Hu have stressed that building a sustained and reliable relationship between our two militaries is an indispensible part of strengthening our two nations’ broader relationship -- a relationship that consists of deepening economic and cultural ties that touch the lives of virtually all our citizens.

 

“Among these are:

 

* Improving maritime security;

* Addressing the challenges posed by the spread of nuclear-, space-, cyber-, and missile technology;

* Maintaining peace and security on the Korean Peninsula by facilitating engagement between the two Koreas and towards the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula;

* Preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon by continuing to work through the dual-track approach; and finally

* Continuing to cooperate generally to diffuse global conflicts and tensions.

 

“I’ve stressed several times the importance of maintaining an ongoing military-to-military dialogue between the United States and the People’s Republic of China. Mechanisms such as the Defense Consultative Talks, the Defense Policy Coordination Talks, and the Military Maritime Consultative Agreement can serve as important channels of communication in this regard.

 

“As Gen. Liang mentioned in his statement, we have agreed to pursue now seven priority areas of cooperation which were agreed to in October 2009. The general and I have also agreed to establish a working group that will develop a new framework for improving ties between the U.S. and Chinese military establishments. This group will meet several times during the coming year, and will present the framework during the 2011 Defense Consultative Talks. We also agreed to hold working group meetings under the Military Maritime Consultative Agreement to discuss future operational safety and to build cooperation in the maritime domain.

 

“As Gen. Liang mentioned in his statement, we agreed to look into a number of joint military activities ranging from maritime search and rescue to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, counter-piracy, counterterrorism, and more. Not only will joint exercises improve certain key capabilities on both sides they also will lead to safer practices for our sea and air forces, and, over time, cultivate trust and lead to more opportunities for defense cooperation. We are in strong agreement. In order to reduce the chances of miscommunication, misunderstanding, or miscalculation, it is important that our military-to-military ties are solid, consistent, and not subject to shifting political winds.

 

“Finally, I was pleased that Gen. Liang noted and said that the Chinese side would consider and study the beginning of a strategic security dialogue -- as part of a broader Strategic and Economic Dialogue -- that covers nuclear, missile defense, space, and cyber issues.

 

“Cultivating personal relationships can be an important part of improving understanding and cooperation. In that vein, Adm. Mullen and I will be pleased to welcome the Chief of the General Staff of the PLA to visit the United States in the first half of this year. And, of course, we are very much looking forward to President Hu’s state visit to Washington next week.

 

“The next two days will provide further opportunities for dialogue with my Chinese colleagues. They include:

 

* Meetings later today with Vice President Xi, the Vice Chairmen of the Central Military Commission followed by an official banquet tonight;

* Discussions with the Minister of Foreign Affairs and with President Hu Jintao tomorrow; and

* On Wednesday, a visit to the PLA’s Second Artillery Corps, the latter providing a key opportunity to advance our discussion of nuclear strategy.

 

“China and the United States are two of the world’s great powers and we both recognize the responsibilities and opportunities that status entails -- including showing the rest of the world the benefits that arise when great nations cooperate on matters of shared interests. Our two nations now have an extraordinary opportunity to define the relationship not by the obstacles that at times divide us, but by the opportunities that exist to foster greater cooperation and bring us closer together.”

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Guest Tamborine Man

Let's just hope middle road Americans don't give up. Let's not let currency traders short the little money I have.

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Let's just hope middle road Americans don't give up. Let's not let currency traders short the little money I have.

 

I am with you. This right wing, left wing, yin, yang, kung foo insanity has to stop. The next trade meeting our leaders need to watch the Green Hornet and do a comparison study on the movie's similarity to the real world. We are completely wasting our potential.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_Y_rLBIxOM

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Guest LAW

Secretary Gates appears to be doing very constructive talks with China.

 

By Jim Garamone

American Forces Press Service

 

BEIJING, Jan. 11, 2011 – If it continues on its current path, North Korea could be a “direct threat” to the United States in five years or less, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said here today.

 

 

Gates has shared with Chinese officials America’s concern about North Korea, and the need for stability on the peninsula. The secretary spoke to reporters at a roundtable following meetings with Chinese President Hu Jintao.

 

Gates told reporters that North Korea is not an immediate threat to the United States.

 

“But on the other hand, I don’t think it is a five-year threat,” the secretary said. “Let me be precise: I think that North Korea will have developed an intercontinental ballistic missile within that time frame.”

 

The secretary thanked Chinese officials for the constructive role they have played in dampening tensions on the peninsula. “They clearly have played a helpful role,” he said.

 

There are two major events that have changed the status quo on the Korean peninsula, Gates said. The first is North Korean leaders continuing their development of nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles.

 

“North Korea is becoming a direct threat to the United States and we have to take that into account,” the secretary said.

 

The second event, he said, is “the sea change in the attitude of the South Korean public in their willingness to tolerate the kind of provocations the North Koreans have engaged in for many years.”

 

In March last year, North Korea torpedoed the South Korean ship Cheonan and killed 46 South Korean sailors. In November, North Korea shelled Yeonpyeong Island, killing two civilians and two South Korean marines.

 

“Clearly, if there is another provocation, there will be pressure on the South Korean government to react,” Gates said. “We consider this a situation of real concern and we think there is some urgency to proceeding down the track of negotiations and engagement.”

 

It’s time, Gates said, for North Korea to engage in meaningful negotiations with its neighbor to the south.

 

“We don’t want to see the situation that we’ve seen so many times before: which is the North Koreans engage in a provocation and then everybody scrambles to try to put ‘Humpty Dumpty’ back together again,” he said. “I’ve used the phrase, ‘I don’t want to buy the same horse twice.’

 

‘I think we would like to see some concrete actions by North Korea that shows they are serious about moving to a negotiation and engagement track,” Gates added.

 

North Korean officials announced that they are ready for negotiations with South Korea. “Rhetoric is not enough at this time,” Gates said. “I think the North Koreans have to demonstrate that they are serious about negotiation and engagement at this point.”

 

The secretary suggested North Korean moratoriums on missile testing and nuclear testing for a start. “There are several areas where they can take concrete actions,” he said.

 

The secretary leaves China for Japan tomorrow, and will visit South Korea later this week.

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