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Guest travelguy

welcome to all at the forum.

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Guest travelguy

great good looking forum , there are certainly some good articles here, i will check back a little later when i get some time.

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Guest Human_*

Just some thing interesting I found on the net. I have a better understanding now as to why Nasa doesn't want to release its report which is about 16,000 pages long. Its 16,365 pages long I think ?

 

You got to love the net for this stuff. But like everything else, you got to dig for it. It's like one of the reports I just read, In Indonesia there was a ground based collision with a cow, and I have several friends who are pilots, and the stories they tell me? I just shake my head.

 

 

http://www.lloyds.com/News_Centre/Features...ar_10032009.htm

 

Potential problems ahead

 

But insurers do flag some potential safety problems ahead. According to David Slevin, aviation team leader at Lloyd’s insurer Faraday, the congestion of the skies and airports is becoming a big issue, with ground collisions being a major worry.

 

“New ground radar systems are being introduced slowly in order to combat these threats,” he says. “The introduction of new, high tech air traffic control systems in most of the developing nations is expected to improve safety—however the huge costs of introducing such systems will prohibit some major economies from upgrading in the near term.”

 

Michael Hansen, co-aviation business leader at Lloyd’s insurer Catlin agrees. “Our concerns are primarily focused on some developing countries in which airline fleets have expanded significantly,” he says. “They are finding it difficult to match this pace of change with the necessary infrastructure support, such as air traffic control, airport technology, and flight and maintenance training.”

 

 

Shortage of pilots

 

The general shortage of experienced pilots around the world is also a concern to insurers, “especially if minimum requirements are reduced to reflect the quality of pilots available,” Hansen says.

 

According to German magazine Aero International, worldwide demand for aircraft pilots is at a record level, with 17,000 new pilots required every year. It based the figure on hirings and a study by US planemaker Boeing that predicts the number of airliners in use around the world will double from 18,230 last year to 36,420 in 2026.

 

To fly them all, 363,000 people would have to train as pilots in the next two decades, the Boeing study indicated. The current shortage is prompting rapidly expanding Asian and Middle Eastern airlines to headhunt pilots from small Western airlines which cannot match the big airlines' pay and special bonuses, the magazine said.

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Guest Human_*

The ground collisions being under reported by a factor of 4, and these collisions are self reported. In other words the airline industry is self policing itself with the FAA taking them at their word. There is no real over sight.

 

By the way; I don't want to be the only one here typing to myself.

 

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Just some thing interesting I found on the net. I have a better understanding now as to why Nasa doesn't want to release its report which is about 16,000 pages long. Its 16,365 pages long I think ?

 

You got to love the net for this stuff. But like everything else, you got to dig for it. It's like one of the reports I just read, In Indonesia there was a ground based collision with a cow, and I have several friends who are pilots, and the stories they tell me? I just shake my head.

http://www.lloyds.com/News_Centre/Features...ar_10032009.htm

 

Potential problems ahead

 

But insurers do flag some potential safety problems ahead. According to David Slevin, aviation team leader at Lloyd’s insurer Faraday, the congestion of the skies and airports is becoming a big issue, with ground collisions being a major worry.

 

“New ground radar systems are being introduced slowly in order to combat these threats,” he says. “The introduction of new, high tech air traffic control systems in most of the developing nations is expected to improve safety—however the huge costs of introducing such systems will prohibit some major economies from upgrading in the near term.”

 

Michael Hansen, co-aviation business leader at Lloyd’s insurer Catlin agrees. “Our concerns are primarily focused on some developing countries in which airline fleets have expanded significantly,” he says. “They are finding it difficult to match this pace of change with the necessary infrastructure support, such as air traffic control, airport technology, and flight and maintenance training.”

Shortage of pilots

 

The general shortage of experienced pilots around the world is also a concern to insurers, “especially if minimum requirements are reduced to reflect the quality of pilots available,” Hansen says.

 

According to German magazine Aero International, worldwide demand for aircraft pilots is at a record level, with 17,000 new pilots required every year. It based the figure on hirings and a study by US planemaker Boeing that predicts the number of airliners in use around the world will double from 18,230 last year to 36,420 in 2026.

 

To fly them all, 363,000 people would have to train as pilots in the next two decades, the Boeing study indicated. The current shortage is prompting rapidly expanding Asian and Middle Eastern airlines to headhunt pilots from small Western airlines which cannot match the big airlines' pay and special bonuses, the magazine said.

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