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State Governments Face Budget Shortfalls

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Have the States EVER thought of living with in their means?

 

For example;

California has 764 State Agencies "Plus or minus 10". Do they really need that many agencies?

Virginia has 153 State Agencies.

 

Then their budgets, health plans, pensions "You get the idea". To what level is enough enough?

 

 

 

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http://www.csmonitor...01s05-usec.html

 

New York - The nation's economic downturn is now squeezing state and city budgets – a financial turn of events that is forcing many mayors and governors to join the growing group of people on their knees asking Congress for help.

 

The sense of urgency has increased because states have seen their revenue fall sharply over the past two weeks. One early estimate puts the states' mid-year budget gap at $24 billion, double the estimate from the end of last month.

 

If Congress does not act soon on a fiscal stimulus package, states are warning of plans to lay off librarians, cut healthcare services, and ask unions to forgo raises. Some mayors are cutting recreational basketball leagues and mothballing housing projects. It's gotten so tough, the mayor of Trenton, N.J., Douglas Palmer, has had to demote firemen.

 

"There are problems everywhere," says Iris Lav, deputy director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington.

 

"The Feds need to step in because it's extremely difficult."

 

Ms. Lav's group estimates 41 states have faced or are facing budget shortfalls. By 2010, she estimates state deficits could ultimately hit $100 billion, or 13 percent to 14 percent of state budgets.

 

"The Feds must help before there is devastation of those budgets," she says.

 

However, mayors and governors are aware the politics of federal fiscal stimulus might prevent them from getting help right away. "Waiting for fiscal stimulus from Washington is an iffy prospect," said Gov. David Paterson (D) of New York at a press conference Wednesday. "It may not happen this year, it may take a while for it to happen in the new administration."

 

Washington observers say Governor Paterson is wise not to expect a check in the mail to solve his budget gap, which amounts to $47 billion over the next four years.

 

"I may be wrong, but just writing a check is unlikely," says Stanley Collender, a budget expert and managing director at Qorvis Communications in Washington. "But, there will be some assistance for states in some form whether it be a loan guarantee or the government buying their paper."

 

If the states had their way, they would like Congress to give them help in four areas: help with the growing number of people applying for Medicaid, more funding for the rising unemployed, help with the growing number on food stamps, and an injection of funds to jump-start infrastructure projects that are ready to go.

 

"We're not asking for a stimulus package because it will fill budget gaps," says Michael Bird, federal affairs counsel of the National Conference of State Legislatures in Washington. "We think it will provide additional benefits for those most disadvantaged by the downturn and create economic activity through the infrastructure package."

 

The cities also have their wish lists for a $89.9 billion package geared towards jobs and infrastructure projects. "We are focused on the lame duck session of Congress next week," says Tom Cochran, executive director of the United States Conference of Mayors in Washington. "We are urging a down payment on a Main Street stimulus package."

 

Mr. Cochran argues that money should go directly to metro areas. "We know how to use the money immediately, we don't want it to get stuck in the state capitals," he says. Mr. Bird counters that the projects may "be done by the state but they are done in localities."

 

The mayor of Trenton, Douglas Palmer, ticks off projects he has had to mothball to help close a $20 million shortfall. He says he has a 46-unit housing project that just needs $500,000 for street engineering. There are new schools that could be jump-started. And, the city has blueprints to repair miles of roads. "Money should go directly to the cities on a project by project basis," he says.

 

He could also use money for salaries. He plans to lay off 70 municipal employees and won't fill 40 vacancies. "I've even had to demote firefighters," he says.

 

Public servants around the nation are beginning to feel the heat. Gov. Donald Carcieri ® of Rhode Island, facing a $372 million gap in fiscal year 2009, has negotiated no pay raises for this year and changes in healthcare benefits, including higher co-pays. The governor meets with legislative leaders next week to look at more belt-tightening, says Amy Kempe, a spokeswoman.

 

Some states are beginning to look at tax hikes to fill the gap. According to news reports, they include Nevada, California, and Oregon.

 

However, governors are mostly trying to avoid raising taxes in a recession. "The governor does not believe it's smart policy to raise broad-based taxes in an economic downturn and does not believe in making the state more uncompetitive," says Ms. Kempe.

 

New York's Paterson, facing a $1.5 billion deficit this year, talked spending cuts instead. The governor pointed out New York increased spending between 1990 and 2007 by 130 percent. With Wall Street cutting jobs, state tax revenues are fading quickly. "We can't get around the fact we have to cut spending," he said.

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Guest human_*

TO ALL STATE AGENCY EMPLOYEES read this and take it as BIBLE; To fund Agency "A" The State WILL take Money from Agency C,D,H, or where ever.

 

Now what does that really mean to you State Agency Employees, And you REALLY going to love this part lol; The State IS TAKING THE MONEY FROM YOUR SALARIES, and PENSIONS, AND THEY ARE NOT REIMBURSING YOU AT ALL.

 

YOU HAVE TO LOOK AT YOUR STATE AGENCY CHARTER to see What YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO BE GETTING in Terms of Salary Increases, as well as health benefits, and YOUR ADORABLE PENSIONS.

 

Now to the State Agency Employees; You are Probably thinking that I'm Full of it? THINK AGAIN.

You are also probably thinking that the LAWYERS Are going to get a part of the money that the state IS STEALING FROM YOU? IT DOESN'T WORK THAT WAY.

 

The Lawyers WILL GET PAID AFTER WINNING FROM THE STATE but they WILL GET PAID BY THE STATE. YOUR MONEY State Agency Employees is yours; That's BY LAW. The Lawyers CAN'T Touch it.

 

<Now you State Agency Employees; You want to Give Your Salary increases to the State? THAT REALLY IS YOUR BUSINESS, Because you see I'm A Republican, and I am telling you the truth, and I honestly don't care if you want to be STUPID.

 

It REALLY IS YOUR MONEY. DON'T BELIEVE ME, LOOK IT UP IN YOUR CHARTER.

 

BY THE WAY; THE STATE ALSO OWES YOU ALL OF THAT MONEY WITH INTEREST.

 

YOU HAVE A NICE YEAR YA HEAR ROFLMAO.>

 

Ya SEE on this I AM NOT THE ONE WHO LOSSES, BUT YOU DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO. LOL

 

BECAUSE YOU NEVER BOTHERED TO DO YOUR HOME WORK.

 

TO ME? THIS IS REALLY GOLDEN.

 

 

 

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Have the States EVER thought of living with in their means?

 

For example;

California has 764 State Agencies "Plus or minus 10". Do they really need that many agencies?

Virginia has 153 State Agencies.

 

Then their budgets, health plans, pensions "You get the idea".

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Guest Fed Up

Virginia has a 12.8 budget shortfall. When businesses are making money then there is no problem. Now that business and consumer spending is down States are not prepared for it.

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Guest human_*

Whether they are prepared for it or not, it's IRRELEVENT. It's Law.

IT really blows my mind. I honestly DON'T UNDERSTAND.

 

 

Had one guy online who kept on telling me that he was a big shot doctor and that his address IS unlisted, his phone is unlisted, and he kept on telling me that I could not find him.

 

I DID, and not only did I have his address, but I also told him his schedule for a week straight, who he hanged with, which doctors he talked with for the week, with times, dates, and the other doctors names.

 

ALL from the internet too, and NO HACKING either.

All I did was ask some search groups out there that I know of to help me find a doctor who is being a jerk online.

 

I honestly hope that I put the fear of the internet in him, and that IT WAS VERY UNWISE FOR HIM TO BE CHEATING ON HIS WIFE, because If I decided to tell his wife? He WOULD HAVE BEEN LIVING IN A SMALL APARTMENT RIGHT NOW.

 

But it's NOT LIMITED TO MALES EITHER, I will never forget a women that I met offline, we had a nice date, and then she tells me that she is MARRIED, and her hubby is disabled, and that she has been cheating on him left, and right, and that she wanted me.

 

THAT DATE ENDED FASTER THAN A BOLT OF LIGHTNING HITTING THE GROUND. The Husband later found out "And not by me Either" that his wife was cheating on him left, and right, and he Killed himself.

 

The Point in this post is that; THERE REALLY IS Alot of Stupid People out there.

 

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Virginia has a 12.8 budget shortfall. When businesses are making money then there is no problem. Now that business and consumer spending is down States are not prepared for it.

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Have the States EVER thought of living with in their means?

 

For example;

California has 764 State Agencies "Plus or minus 10". Do they really need that many agencies?

Virginia has 153 State Agencies.

 

Then their budgets, health plans, pensions "You get the idea". To what level is enough enough?

 

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/1114/p01s05-usec.html

 

New York - The nation's economic downturn is now squeezing state and city budgets – a financial turn of events that is forcing many mayors and governors to join the growing group of people on their knees asking Congress for help.

 

The sense of urgency has increased because states have seen their revenue fall sharply over the past two weeks. One early estimate puts the states' mid-year budget gap at $24 billion, double the estimate from the end of last month.

 

If Congress does not act soon on a fiscal stimulus package, states are warning of plans to lay off librarians, cut healthcare services, and ask unions to forgo raises. Some mayors are cutting recreational basketball leagues and mothballing housing projects. It's gotten so tough, the mayor of Trenton, N.J., Douglas Palmer, has had to demote firemen.

 

"There are problems everywhere," says Iris Lav, deputy director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington.

 

"The Feds need to step in because it's extremely difficult."

 

Ms. Lav's group estimates 41 states have faced or are facing budget shortfalls. By 2010, she estimates state deficits could ultimately hit $100 billion, or 13 percent to 14 percent of state budgets.

 

"The Feds must help before there is devastation of those budgets," she says.

 

However, mayors and governors are aware the politics of federal fiscal stimulus might prevent them from getting help right away. "Waiting for fiscal stimulus from Washington is an iffy prospect," said Gov. David Paterson (D) of New York at a press conference Wednesday. "It may not happen this year, it may take a while for it to happen in the new administration."

 

Washington observers say Governor Paterson is wise not to expect a check in the mail to solve his budget gap, which amounts to $47 billion over the next four years.

 

"I may be wrong, but just writing a check is unlikely," says Stanley Collender, a budget expert and managing director at Qorvis Communications in Washington. "But, there will be some assistance for states in some form whether it be a loan guarantee or the government buying their paper."

 

If the states had their way, they would like Congress to give them help in four areas: help with the growing number of people applying for Medicaid, more funding for the rising unemployed, help with the growing number on food stamps, and an injection of funds to jump-start infrastructure projects that are ready to go.

 

"We're not asking for a stimulus package because it will fill budget gaps," says Michael Bird, federal affairs counsel of the National Conference of State Legislatures in Washington. "We think it will provide additional benefits for those most disadvantaged by the downturn and create economic activity through the infrastructure package."

 

The cities also have their wish lists for a $89.9 billion package geared towards jobs and infrastructure projects. "We are focused on the lame duck session of Congress next week," says Tom Cochran, executive director of the United States Conference of Mayors in Washington. "We are urging a down payment on a Main Street stimulus package."

 

Mr. Cochran argues that money should go directly to metro areas. "We know how to use the money immediately, we don't want it to get stuck in the state capitals," he says. Mr. Bird counters that the projects may "be done by the state but they are done in localities."

 

The mayor of Trenton, Douglas Palmer, ticks off projects he has had to mothball to help close a $20 million shortfall. He says he has a 46-unit housing project that just needs $500,000 for street engineering. There are new schools that could be jump-started. And, the city has blueprints to repair miles of roads. "Money should go directly to the cities on a project by project basis," he says.

 

He could also use money for salaries. He plans to lay off 70 municipal employees and won't fill 40 vacancies. "I've even had to demote firefighters," he says.

 

Public servants around the nation are beginning to feel the heat. Gov. Donald Carcieri ® of Rhode Island, facing a $372 million gap in fiscal year 2009, has negotiated no pay raises for this year and changes in healthcare benefits, including higher co-pays. The governor meets with legislative leaders next week to look at more belt-tightening, says Amy Kempe, a spokeswoman.

 

Some states are beginning to look at tax hikes to fill the gap. According to news reports, they include Nevada, California, and Oregon.

 

However, governors are mostly trying to avoid raising taxes in a recession. "The governor does not believe it's smart policy to raise broad-based taxes in an economic downturn and does not believe in making the state more uncompetitive," says Ms. Kempe.

 

New York's Paterson, facing a $1.5 billion deficit this year, talked spending cuts instead. The governor pointed out New York increased spending between 1990 and 2007 by 130 percent. With Wall Street cutting jobs, state tax revenues are fading quickly. "We can't get around the fact we have to cut spending," he said.

 

Anyone care to guess the last time the District of Columbia's buget wasn't operating "in the Red"?

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Guest Uncommon Wisdom

According to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, U.S. states in fiscal 2011 could be facing the worst budget situation since the recession began in 2007.

 

From Maine to California, states' cumulative budget shortfall "will likely reach $140 billion in the coming year, the largest shortfall yet in a string of huge annual gaps that date back to the beginning of the recession," the report says.

 

Since all states except Vermont have to balance their budgets, that means states are going to have to slash payrolls. This will worsen an already tough economic climate. Previously, states looked to the federal government to see them through tight budgetary times, but this time, Republicans and enough Democrats have united to say "no" to more federal money for state payrolls.

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Guest OurNationisGone

We need REAL and lasting change in this country and after decade after decade of failure with the Reps and Dems in power ... well, just how long will it take before We the Sheeple see the light?

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Guest Brian

This year, Arizona raised about $1 billion selling some of the state Capitol buildings, prisons, and other property to investors. California was about to sell off 11 buildings, but a San Jose judge temporarily has blocked it. Louisiana, New Hampshire announced they are planning to do the same. Maryland and Virginia are planning on axing public education. You know things are bad when states are considering exemptions for financial institutions. Underfunded pensions and other liabilities will now be a normal pain for everyone. All because some greedy Wall Street bastards and the government crooks that allowed poor people to buy homes they could not pay for. I have a great project for someone to focus on. Root out all the people who did this to us and put their name on a public wall of shame.

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Guest OurNationisGone

Look for these same crooks to legalize and run gambling halls and marijuana clinics in the next year to pay for their reckless habits.

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Here is a thought. Start a campaign to nurture new American manufacturers to create more jobs. Part of the condition of the incubation program is that the company must promise to stay in the region where it started or give a 50 percent share of its stock to the state.

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Guest 詹姆斯

U.S. companies came to China. Not the other way around. Play nice and China will keep helping U.S.

 

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-12/31/c_13671301.htm

 

New York City has a deficit of 2 billion dollars through June 2012 with a budget of 63.1 billion dollars in Fiscal Year 2010.

 

The city is talking about layoffs in all city agencies, closing 20 fire departments at night, reducing services for seniors, libraries and cultural centers.

 

Los Angeles faces a deficit of 438 million dollars through June 2012 with a budget of 6.7 billion dollars in Fiscal Year 2011.

 

The Los Angeles City Administration Office plans to cut 225 civilian positions in the Police Department, reduce firefighting staffing and eliminate a dozen positions in the City Attorney's Office and General Service Department.

 

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger came to Washington earlier this year to get seven billion dollars for his state government, which resorted to paying off vendors with scrip and delaying state income-tax refunds. Illinois seems to be in even worse shape. A recent credit rating showed it weaker than Iceland and only slightly stronger than Iraq.

 

The bond market will quit financing California and Illinois long before the federal government

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I had some time on this holiday to share some simple number crunching with information I gathered with everyone.

 

According to the CIA the United States has a workforce of 156 million. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics we are at a 9.8 percent unemployment rate. So we have roughly 140 million people currently working.

 

According to the Tax Foundation, a nonpartisan organization, the average American pays an average tax rate of 12.60% percent on their income as of 2008.

 

According to the figures released from the 2007 US Census the median earnings of men who worked full time, year-round were $45,113 and women were $35,102.

 

Average Tax for Men: $5684.24

 

Average Tax for Women: $4422.85

 

Average Tax mean = $5000

 

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics the average federal worker earned an average salary of $67,691, the average state government employee earned an average salary of $47,231, and local government employee earned 41,000.

 

So, I estimate it takes 13 private sector workers to pay for one federal employee and 10 private sector workers to pay for on state employee, and 8 private sector workers to pay for a local employee.

 

Now double this amount for public sector compensation (health insurance, pensions, and other benefits)

 

The federal civilian workforce is estimated 2.15 million workers. This means it takes 56 million private sector workers to pay this expense.

 

The 50 state workforce is estimated 3.8 million workers. This means it takes 30 million private sector workers to pay for this expense.

 

The national local government workforce is estimated 10.9 million workers. This means it takes 87 million private sector workers to pay for this expense.

 

Add another $1.8 for state and $3.5 billion for local part-time workforce. That equates to another million workers.

 

Using my simple calculations we are already at 174 million average working people have to pay the expense for the full time public sector workforce.

 

Deducting the taxes $84 million dollars paid by the 16.85 million full time public sector workers we are come to 157 million tax payers are needed to just pay for the the public sector work force.

 

Now this does calculation does not include all the other expenses and revenues that occur within our federal government. I do not have the time or resources to undertake such a monumental task. But, I think you get the picture.

 

Entitlements are going the way of the Dodo.

 

250px-Dodo_1.JPG

 

http://www.census.gov/govs/apes/

http://www.fedscope.opm.gov/

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

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Guest Fedup

Adjusting your current calculation

 

14,000,000,000,000 = National Debt

 

144,103,375 = Current Workforce

 

$97,152.48 = Individual Taxpayer Debt

 

We are sooo fraked.

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Guest HUMAN

With the amount that is owed funded, and underfunded liabilities there is only one chance in hell that this country is going to get out of this period.

 

114 trillion that this country owes. Enjoy the nightmare. The one pleasure of all of this is for me is? Fill in the blanks.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Adjusting your current calculation

 

14,000,000,000,000 = National Debt

 

144,103,375 = Current Workforce

 

$97,152.48 = Individual Taxpayer Debt

 

We are sooo fraked.

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