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Guest LAW_*

Racism in American Politics

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Guest LAW_*

I am sick of all the racial bantering. It seems the Democratic Party has been focusing on the forces of division rather than the forces of unity.

 

Last week, we had Geraldine Ferraro telling the Daily Breeze in Torrance that "If Obama was a white man, he would not be in this position. And if he was a woman, he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept."

 

This week we have Pastor Jeremiah Wright of the United Church of Christ telling his congregation "Barack knows what it means to be a black man living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people. Hillary can never know that. Hillary ain't never been called a **derogatory term used to refer to black people**."

 

This type of rhetoric in political campaigns is used to influence voters. A crafter of racism does care about the good of our country. A crafter of racism does this only to maintain power. They make the mistake of characterizing American voters similar to the Roman mob rather than as individual citizens of a great Republic.

 

The inconvenient truth is both the Clinton and Obama camps are wrong in what they are doing. Both groups are guilty of the same sin. Both groups are stoking the fire of racism between blacks and whites.

 

The party of the people may have lost the Presidency with this divisive theater.

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Guest DemocratsHateTheUS

 

 

Jeremiah Wright - Obama's mentor - Hate speech

 

The Obama campaign said in a statement, "Senator Obama is proud of his pastor and his church."

 

-Mr. Wright, who has long prided himself on criticizing the establishment, said he knew that he may not play well in Mr. Obama's audition for the ultimate establishment job.

"If Barack gets past the primary, he might have to publicly distance himself from me," Mr. Wright said with a shrug. "I said it to Barack personally, and he said yeah, that might have to happen."

 

-"If you want to understand where Barack gets his feeling and rhetoric from," says the Rev. Jim Wallis, a leader of the religious left, "just look at Jeremiah Wright."

 

-Obama has said valuing Wright's "day-to-day political advice"

 

-In 2006 Obama & wife gave $60,307 to charity and the largest single amount of that was to Trinity United Church of Christ for $22,500

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Guest Clifford Sharples

For me, and most of my friends and family that support Sen. Obama, his skin color or alleged bargain of relieving some imaginary racial guilt have nothing to do with his appeal. Itt is exactly the man, the person, the human that is Barack Obama that we trust and believe in. He has lived an imperfect, challenging, inspiring, dedicated life. He brings a tapestry of experiences and cultures from his childhood and adult life. He brings intellect connected to compassion, common sense connected to understanding. And finally, he invites us all to participate and engage, rather than blindly (or apathetically) trust our leaders who try to present their years of experiences or engineered life-long career pursuits maintaining the status quo.

 

I want a leader who is human, with all the imperfections and uncensored experiences imbedded in an ethical, principled man to provide a new reality for America's increasingly troubled state.

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Guest ODEH ODEH

Rev. Wright comments are not the first of its kind in the country and actually a reflection of his life experience, coupled with the very callous, cold hearted and insensitive way the people of color were treated during the darkest era in the history of the country, is a souvenir of the perpetration of crime against mankind by some faction of the population against another.

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What is happenning is not REPUBLICAN VS. DEMOCRAT. What is happenning is not DEMOCRAT VS. DEMOCRAT. This is PAST VS. FUTURE

 

Our current class system is throwing everything it can at Barack Obama because it intends to halt our forward progress into a greatly improved future. The “system” has been able to thrive for over 200 years in America. This system has unfairly limited, overtly or covertly, consciously or unconsciously, Americans life chances on the basis of their ethnicity. Barack Obama intends to END the system’s reign and we will be victorious as long as we band together and continue to pick each other up when we get injured. The serpent from which racism is fed knows the pain that it gives.

 

Social manifestations of black separatism are often seen by whites as a sign of anti-white racism, when they usually represent an attempt by black people to construct places of sanctuary where we can escape, if only for a time, white domination. Rev. Wright made the mistake of displaying his anger in a religious sanctuary. As a minister I agree that he should have focused on healing the pain that our African American community feels. What was apparent is that this pain of racism is too much for Rev. Wright to bear. It is very painful for an African American to be called N - I - G - G - E -R.

 

But, what I do know is that any lesser class member who is dedicated to creating social uplift is often met with criticism and ridicule from "practical" people who claim that such goals are idealistic and destined for failure. Practitioners of That's-Just-The-Way-It-Is-ism are typically the same people who benefit from the way things are. Should people who suffer the effects of exploitation and oppression also accept their own anguish as "just the way it is?" If not, why should we accept anything less than a better world for everyone? Justice is never too much to expect.

 

The following definitions, provided by educator Louise Derman-Sparks, may be helpful in gaining a better understanding of why prejudice and racism are not synonymous:

 

PREJUDICE: belief in stereotypes

BIGOTRY: belief in White supremacy

RACISM: attitude, action, or way of life whose outcome oppresses people of color and benefits White people, regardless of stated intent.

WHITE PRIVILEGE: the consequences of historical institutionalized racism; the benefits that Whites receive (economic, social, cultural, political).

 

Americans need to understand what the Civil Rights Movement was all about.

 

I understand that many Americans do not understand the reality of racism and the psychological impact that slavery had on African Americans because it does not affect them. It is difficult for me to understand the concept of the "White Man's Burden" to take care of all the other "inferior" races of the earth. I do understand what is the "Black Man's Burden." Maybe this video will help people understand. Believe it or not this African American likes U2.

 

I believe change will come.

 

 

 

I like the video addition Luke.

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Guest Dave's Not Here

How easy we forget that President George Bush's religious backer got busted for buying crack from a gay prostitute? Ted Haggard, the spiritual leader of a 30 million member strong, 45,000 church National Association of Evangelicals, was forced to resign accused of buying drugs and having a three-year homosexual affair with a male escort from Denver! Does that make George Bush a gay crack smoker?

 

Haggard famously claimed that "the only difference between me and George Bush is that Bush drives a Ford and I drive a Chevy."

 

I think Rev. Wright's remarks were harsh, but Obama should not be blamed for them.

 

Maybe the media should be focusing on this.

 

http://www.bettybowers.com/isbushgay.html

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Guest Senator Barack Obama

At various stages in the campaign, some commentators have deemed me either "too black" or "not black enough." We saw racial tensions bubble to the surface during the week before the South Carolina primary. The press has scoured every exit poll for the latest evidence of racial polarization, not just in terms of white and black, but black and brown as well.

 

And yet, it has only been in the last couple of weeks that the discussion of race in this campaign has taken a particularly divisive turn.

 

On one end of the spectrum, we've heard the implication that my candidacy is somehow an exercise in affirmative action; that it's based solely on the desire of wide-eyed liberals to purchase racial reconciliation on the cheap. On the other end, we've heard my former pastor, Reverend Jeremiah Wright, use incendiary language to express views that have the potential not only to widen the racial divide, but views that denigrate both the greatness and the goodness of our nation; that rightly offend white and black alike.

 

I have already condemned, in unequivocal terms, the statements of Reverend Wright that have caused such controversy. For some, nagging questions remain. Did I know him to be an occasionally fierce critic of American domestic and foreign policy? Of course. Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes. Did I strongly disagree with many of his political views? Absolutely - just as I'm sure many of you have heard remarks from your pastors, priests, or rabbis with which you strongly disagreed.

 

But the remarks that have caused this recent firestorm weren't simply controversial. They weren't simply a religious leader's effort to speak out against perceived injustice. Instead, they expressed a profoundly distorted view of this country - a view that sees white racism as endemic, and that elevates what is wrong with America above all that we know is right with America; a view that sees the conflicts in the Middle East as rooted primarily in the actions of stalwart allies like Israel, instead of emanating from the perverse and hateful ideologies of radical Islam.

 

As such, Reverend Wright's comments were not only wrong but divisive, divisive at a time when we need unity; racially charged at a time when we need to come together to solve a set of monumental problems - two wars, a terrorist threat, a falling economy, a chronic health care crisis and potentially devastating climate change; problems that are neither black or white or Latino or Asian, but rather problems that confront us all.

 

Given my background, my politics, and my professed values and ideals, there will no doubt be those for whom my statements of condemnation are not enough. Why associate myself with Reverend Wright in the first place, they may ask? Why not join another church? And I confess that if all that I knew of Reverend Wright were the snippets of those sermons that have run in an endless loop on the television and You Tube, or if Trinity United Church of Christ conformed to the caricatures being peddled by some commentators, there is no doubt that I would react in much the same way

 

But the truth is, that isn't all that I know of the man. The man I met more than twenty years ago is a man who helped introduce me to my Christian faith, a man who spoke to me about our obligations to love one another; to care for the sick and lift up the poor. He is a man who served his country as a U.S. Marine; who has studied and lectured at some of the finest universities and seminaries in the country, and who for over thirty years led a church that serves the community by doing God's work here on Earth - by housing the homeless, ministering to the needy, providing day care services and scholarships and prison ministries, and reaching out to those suffering from HIV/AIDS.

 

In my first book, Dreams From My Father, I described the experience of my first service at Trinity:

 

People began to shout, to rise from their seats and clap and cry out, a forceful wind carrying the reverend's voice up into the rafters. And in that single note hope! I heard something else; at the foot of that cross, inside the thousands of churches across the city, I imagined the stories of ordinary black people merging with the stories of David and Goliath, Moses and Pharaoh, the Christians in the lion's den, Ezekiel's field of dry bones. Those stories of survival, and freedom, and hope became our story, my story; the blood that had spilled was our blood, the tears our tears; until this black church, on this bright day, seemed once more a vessel carrying the story of a people into future generations and into a larger world. Our trials and triumphs became at once unique and universal, black and more than black; in chronicling our journey, the stories and songs gave us a means to reclaim memories tha t we didn't need to feel shame about…memories that all people might study and cherish and with which we could start to rebuild.

 

That has been my experience at Trinity. Like other predominantly black churches across the country, Trinity embodies the black community in its entirety the doctor and the welfare mom, the model student and the former gang-banger. Like other black churches, Trinity's services are full of raucous laughter and sometimes bawdy humor. They are full of dancing, clapping, screaming and shouting that may seem jarring to the untrained ear. The church contains in full the kindness and cruelty, the fierce intelligence and the shocking ignorance, the struggles and successes, the love and yes, the bitterness and bias that make up the black experience in America.

 

And this helps explain, perhaps, my relationship with Reverend Wright. As imperfect as he may be, he has been like family to me. He strengthened my faith, officiated my wedding, and baptized my children. Not once in my conversations with him have I heard him talk about any ethnic group in derogatory terms, or treat whites with whom he interacted with anything but courtesy and respect. He contains within him the contradictions the good and the bad of the community that he has served diligently for so many years.

 

I can no more disown him than I can disown the black community. I can no more disown him than I can my white grandmother a woman who helped raise me, a woman who sacrificed again and again for me, a woman who loves me as much as she loves anything in this world, but a woman who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe.

 

These people are a part of me. And they are a part of America, this country that I love.

 

Some will see this as an attempt to justify or excuse comments that are simply inexcusable. I can assure you it is not. I suppose the politically safe thing would be to move on from this episode and just hope that it fades into the woodwork. We can dismiss Reverend Wright as a crank or a demagogue, just as some have dismissed Geraldine Ferraro, in the aftermath of her recent statements, as harboring some deep-seated racial bias.

 

But race is an issue that I believe this nation cannot afford to ignore right now. We would be making the same mistake that Reverend Wright made in his offending sermons about America to simplify and stereotype and amplify the negative to the point that it distorts reality.

 

The fact is that the comments that have been made and the issues that have surfaced over the last few weeks reflect the complexities of race in this country that we've never really worked through a part of our union that we have yet to perfect. And if we walk away now, if we simply retreat into our respective corners, we will never be able to come together and solve challenges like health care, or education, or the need to find good jobs for every American.

 

Understanding this reality requires a reminder of how we arrived at this point. As William Faulkner once wrote, "The past isn't dead and buried. In fact, it isn't even past. We do not need to recite here the history of racial injustice in this country. But we do need to remind ourselves that so many of the disparities that exist in the African-American community today can be directly traced to inequalities passed on from an earlier generation that suffered under the brutal legacy of slavery and Jim Crow.

 

Segregated schools were, and are, inferior schools; we still haven't fixed them, fifty years after Brown v. Board of Education, and the inferior education they provided, then and now, helps explain the pervasive achievement gap between today's black and white students.

 

Legalized discrimination - where blacks were prevented, often through violence, from owning property, or loans were not granted to African-American business owners, or black homeowners could not access FHA mortgages, or blacks were excluded from unions, or the police force, or fire departments – meant that black families could not amass any meaningful wealth to bequeath to future generations. That history helps explain the wealth and income gap between black and white, and the concentrated pockets of poverty that persists in so many of today's urban and rural communities.

 

A lack of economic opportunity among black men, and the shame and frustration that came from not being able to provide for one's family, contributed to the erosion of black families - a problem that welfare policies for many years may have worsened. And the lack of basic services in so many urban black neighborhoods parks for kids to play in, police walking the beat, regular garbage pick-up and building code enforcement, all helped create a cycle of violence, blight and neglect that continue to haunt us.

 

This is the reality in which Reverend Wright and other African-Americans of his generation grew up. They came of age in the late fifties and early sixties, a time when segregation was still the law of the land and opportunity was systematically constricted. What's remarkable is not how many failed in the face of discrimination, but rather how many men and women overcame the odds; how many were able to make a way out of no way for those like me who would come after them.

 

But for all those who scratched and clawed their way to get a piece of the American Dream, there were many who didn't make it, those who were ultimately defeated, in one way or another, by discrimination. That legacy of defeat was passed on to future generations, those young men and increasingly young women who we see standing on street corners or languishing in our prisons, without hope or prospects for the future. Even for those blacks who did make it, questions of race, and racism, continue to define their worldview in fundamental ways. For the men and women of Reverend Wright's generation, the memories of humiliation and doubt and fear have not gone away; nor has the anger and the bitterness of those years. That anger may not get expressed in public, in front of white co-workers or white friends. But it does find voice in the barbershop or around the kitchen table. At times, that anger is exploited by politicia ns, to gin up votes along racial lines, or to make up for a politician's own failings.

 

And occasionally it finds voice in the church on Sunday morning, in the pulpit and in the pews. The fact that so many people are surprised to hear that anger in some of Reverend Wright’s sermons simply reminds us of the old truism that the most segregated hour in American life occurs on Sunday morning. That anger is not always productive; indeed, all too often it distracts attention from solving real problems; it keeps us from squarely facing our own complicity in our condition, and prevents the African-American community from forging the alliances it needs to bring about real change. But the anger is real; it is powerful; and to simply wish it away, to condemn it without understanding its roots, only serves to widen the chasm of misunderstanding that exists between the races.

 

In fact, a similar anger exists within segments of the white community. Most working- and middle-class white Americans don't feel that they have been particularly privileged by their race. Their experience is the immigrant experience as far as they're concerned, no one's handed them anything, they've built it from scratch. They've worked hard all their lives, many times only to see their jobs shipped overseas or their pension dumped after a lifetime of labor. They are anxious about their futures, and feel their dreams slipping away; in an era of stagnant wages and global competition, opportunity comes to be seen as a zero sum game, in which your dreams come at my expense. So when they are told to bus their children to a school across town; when they hear that an African American is getting an advantage in landing a good job or a spot in a good college because of an injustice that they themselves never committ ed; when they're told that their fears about crime in urban neighborhoods are somehow prejudiced, resentment builds over time.

 

Like the anger within the black community, these resentments aren't always expressed in polite company. But they have helped shape the political landscape for at least a generation. Anger over welfare and affirmative action helped forge the Reagan Coalition. Politicians routinely exploited fears of crime for their own electoral ends. Talk show hosts and conservative commentators built entire careers unmasking bogus claims of racism while dismissing legitimate discussions of racial injustice and inequality as mere political correctness or reverse racism.

 

Just as black anger often proved counterproductive, so have these white resentments distracted attention from the real culprits of the middle class squeeze, a corporate culture rife with inside dealing, questionable accounting practices, and short-term greed; a Washington dominated by lobbyists and special interests; economic policies that favor the few over the many. And yet, to wish away the resentments of white Americans, to label them as misguided or even racist, without recognizing they are grounded in legitimate concerns this too widens the racial divide, and blocks the path to understanding.

 

This is where we are right now. It's a racial stalemate we've been stuck in for years. Contrary to the claims of some of my critics, black and white, I have never been so naïve as to believe that we can get beyond our racial divisions in a single election cycle, or with a single candidacy, particularly a candidacy as imperfect as my own.

 

But I have asserted a firm conviction, a conviction rooted in my faith in God and my faith in the American people that working together we can move beyond some of our old racial wounds, and that in fact we have no choice is we are to continue on the path of a more perfect union.

 

For the African-American community, that path means embracing the burdens of our past without becoming victims of our past. It means continuing to insist on a full measure of justice in every aspect of American life. But it also means binding our particular grievances for better health care, and better schools, and better jobs - to the larger aspirations of all Americans -- the white woman struggling to break the glass ceiling, the white man whose been laid off, the immigrant trying to feed his family. And it means taking full responsibility for own lives by demanding more from our fathers, and spending more time with our children, and reading to them, and teaching them that while they may face challenges and discrimination in their own lives, they must never succumb to despair or cynicism; they must always believe that they can write their own destiny.

 

Ironically, this quintessentially American and yes, conservative notion of self-help found frequent expression in Reverend Wright's sermons. But what my former pastor too often failed to understand is that embarking on a program of self-help also requires a belief that society can change.

 

The profound mistake of Reverend Wright's sermons is not that he spoke about racism in our society. It's that he spoke as if our society was static; as if no progress has been made; as if this country a country that has made it possible for one of his own members to run for the highest office in the land and build a coalition of white and black; Latino and Asian, rich and poor, young and old -- is still irrevocably bound to a tragic past. But what we know -- what we have seen is that America can change. That is true genius of this nation. What we have already achieved gives us hope, the audacity to hope for what we can and must achieve tomorrow.

 

In the white community, the path to a more perfect union means acknowledging that what ails the African-American community does not just exist in the minds of black people; that the legacy of discrimination - and current incidents of discrimination, while less overt than in the past - are real and must be addressed. Not just with words, but with deeds by investing in our schools and our communities; by enforcing our civil rights laws and ensuring fairness in our criminal justice system; by providing this generation with ladders of opportunity that were unavailable for previous generations. It requires all Americans to realize that your dreams do not have to come at the expense of my dreams; that investing in the health, welfare, and education of black and brown and white children will ultimately help all of America prosper.

 

In the end, then, what is called for is nothing more, and nothing less, than what all the world's great religions demand that we do unto others as we would have them do unto us. Let us be our brother's keeper, Scripture tells us. Let us be our sister's keeper. Let us find that common stake we all have in one another, and let our politics reflect that spirit as well.

 

For we have a choice in this country. We can accept a politics that breeds division, and conflict, and cynicism. We can tackle race only as spectacle as we did in the OJ trial or in the wake of tragedy, as we did in the aftermath of Katrina - or as fodder for the nightly news. We can play Reverend Wright's sermons on every channel, every day and talk about them from now until the election, and make the only question in this campaign whether or not the American people think that I somehow believe or sympathize with his most offensive words. We can pounce on some gaffe by a Hillary supporter as evidence that she's playing the race card, or we can speculate on whether white men will all flock to John McCain in the general election regardless of his policies.

 

We can do that.

 

But if we do, I can tell you that in the next election, we'll be talking about some other distraction. And then another one. And then another one. And nothing will change.

 

That is one option. Or, at this moment, in this election, we can come together and say, "Not this time." This time we want to talk about the crumbling schools that are stealing the future of black children and white children and Asian children and Hispanic children and Native American children. This time we want to reject the cynicism that tells us that these kids can't learn; that those kids who don't look like us are somebody else's problem. The children of America are not those kids, they are our kids, and we will not let them fall behind in a 21st century economy. Not this time.

 

This time we want to talk about how the lines in the Emergency Room are filled with whites and blacks and Hispanics who do not have health care; who don't have the power on their own to overcome the special interests in Washington, but who can take them on if we do it together.

 

This time we want to talk about the shuttered mills that once provided a decent life for men and women of every race, and the homes for sale that once belonged to Americans from every religion, every region, every walk of life. This time we want to talk about the fact that the real problem is not that someone who doesn't look like you might take your job; it's that the corporation you work for will ship it overseas for nothing more than a profit.

 

This time we want to talk about the men and women of every color and creed who serve together, and fight together, and bleed together under the same proud flag. We want to talk about how to bring them home from a war that never should've been authorized and never should've been waged, and we want to talk about how we'll show our patriotism by caring for them, and their families, and giving them the benefits they have earned.

 

I would not be running for President if I didn't believe with all my heart that this is what the vast majority of Americans want for this country. This union may never be perfect, but generation after generation has shown that it can always be perfected. And today, whenever I find myself feeling doubtful or cynical about this possibility, what gives me the most hope is the next generation, the young people whose attitudes and beliefs and openness to change have already made history in this election.

 

There is one story in particularly that I'd like to leave you with today, a story I told when I had the great honor of speaking on Dr. King's birthday at his home church, Ebenezer Baptist, in Atlanta.

 

There is a young, twenty-three year old white woman named Ashley Baia who organized for our campaign in Florence, South Carolina. She had been working to organize a mostly African-American community since the beginning of this campaign, and one day she was at a roundtable discussion where everyone went around telling their story and why they were there.

 

And Ashley said that when she was nine years old, her mother got cancer. And because she had to miss days of work, she was let go and lost her health care. They had to file for bankruptcy, and that's when Ashley decided that she had to do something to help her mom.

 

She knew that food was one of their most expensive costs, and so Ashley convinced her mother that what she really liked and really wanted to eat more than anything else was mustard and relish sandwiches. Because that was the cheapest way to eat.

 

She did this for a year until her mom got better, and she told everyone at the roundtable that the reason she joined our campaign was so that she could help the millions of other children in the country who want and need to help their parents too.

 

Now Ashley might have made a different choice. Perhaps somebody told her along the way that the source of her mother's problems were blacks who were on welfare and too lazy to work, or Hispanics who were coming into the country illegally. But she didn't. She sought out allies in her fight against injustice.

 

Anyway, Ashley finishes her story and then goes around the room and asks everyone else why they're supporting the campaign. They all have different stories and reasons. Many bring up a specific issue. And finally they come to this elderly black man who's been sitting there quietly the entire time. And Ashley asks him why he's there. And he does not bring up a specific issue. He does not say health care or the economy. He does not say education or the war. He does not say that he was there because of Barack Obama. He simply says to everyone in the room, "I am here because of Ashley."

 

"I'm here because of Ashley." By itself, that single moment of recognition between that young white girl and that old black man is not enough. It is not enough to give health care to the sick, or jobs to the jobless, or education to our children.

 

But it is where we start. It is where our union grows stronger. And as so many generations have come to realize over the course of the two-hundred and twenty one years since a band of patriots signed that document in Philadelphia, that is where the perfection begins.

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I personally glad that this topic is being discussed in open political forums rather than the whispered conversations at dinner tables. Here is the video of Barack Obama speech in Philadelphia, PA at Constitution Center.

 

 

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Guest Suzanne

I was reminded today why I fell under the spell of Barack Obama the first time I heard him speak four years ago. Brilliance combined with honesty in a man more authentic, more decent than anyone in political life since Abraham Lincoln. If you read Doris Kearn Goodwin's Lincoln book "Team of Rivals" the similarities between these two men in character and personality are striking.

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Guest Heidi

I was not born in this country, I am German by birth and became an American citizen. I do not look at myself as a German-American but as an American. I, personally think is it time we start thinking that way because in my opinion until we do we will never see change.

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Guest Blu

Is there anyone in the world perfect? Not since JESUS was here, at least that's what was recorded in the book right??

So what about Barack?

What about AMERICA?

Was AMERICA founded on FAITH IN GOD which Barack in not afraid to mention.

Was AMERICA chosen BY GOD to become a Nation where their is Liberty and Justice for all..

Which I see Barack defend....

IS AMERICA the land of the free and the home of the BRAVE!!!!

Which I see Barack represent!!

I hope that "FAITH, LOVE and HOPE" would change AMERICA!!

Would Bless AMERICA!!

Would WAKE AMERICA!!!!

I know that Barack did not have to defend his FAITH but he DID!

I know that Barack did not have to correct his FORMER PASTOR but HE DID!

I know Barack didn't have to explain to the world he IS A BELIEVER!!

But HE DID!!

I 'm not saying he's perfect, I'm not defended or justifying all of his views, but what I am saying is that....., WE THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES of AMERICA and TO THE REPUBLIC FOR WHICH IT STANDS 1 Nation UNDER GOD!!!!! What ever happened to that???? WHO ARE we UNDER I wonder????

I think we outta give GOD a try, WE KNOW and see WE WHAT Man can DO!!!

LET'S STAND TOGETHER AMERICA!!!

BECOME what our title is, THE UNITED STATES of AMERICA!!!

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Guest Patrick J. Buchanan

In his Philadelphia address on race, Sen. Obama identified as a root cause of white resentment affirmative action -- the punishing of white working- and middle-class folks for sins they did not commit:

 

"Most working- and middle-class white Americans don't feel that they have been particularly privileged by their race," said Barack. "As far as they're concerned, no one's handed them anything. ... So when they ... hear that an African American is getting an advantage in landing a good job or a spot in a good college because of an injustice that they themselves never committed ... resentment builds over time."

 

On this issue, Barack seemed to have nailed it.

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Guest Hillary in 2008
In his Philadelphia address on race, Sen. Obama identified as a root cause of white resentment affirmative action -- the punishing of white working- and middle-class folks for sins they did not commit:

 

"Most working- and middle-class white Americans don't feel that they have been particularly privileged by their race," said Barack. "As far as they're concerned, no one's handed them anything. ... So when they ... hear that an African American is getting an advantage in landing a good job or a spot in a good college because of an injustice that they themselves never committed ... resentment builds over time."

 

On this issue, Barack seemed to have nailed it.

 

He may have stated it correctly, but it does not change the fact that he could have gone to a new preacher if he did not like what was being said.

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Guest J. Hogue

The next great social crisis in America after racism will be sociopathic behavior arising from Media-imprinting. US culture is beginning to reap a 36-year injection of media violence.

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To all you Hillary supporters I would like you to find me proof that Obama is anti-white and racist. Obama MUST hate himself, his mother who raised him as well as his white grandparents who gave him love, affection and a path to success. He must also hate his own daughters who are 1/4 white.

 

 

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Guest Matt_*

Instead of talking about the fact that Hillary Clinton took $110,000 from a New York food company she later helped by introducing a bill to remove import duties on tomatoes, we're ranting and raving about about Obama's blackness.

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Guest human_*

The reasons' that I have not touched this issue is two fold.

 

A; Barack switched it on all of you from being an issue upon his racism "With his association with Rev Wright".

 

B; It's an ENDLESS ISSUE. The African American Community is accepting Hispanics, because NOW MY GROUP IS BROWN ENOUGH FOR THEM "Hispanics". Excuse me, but which group is being racist now???????

 

And barack obama is going to change the way politics is practiced here in D.C.?

 

The politics of racism is ALIVE and WELL.

 

Barack hasn't done ANYTHING to change it, nor will he.

 

 

I WONT COMMENT ON THIS ISSUE ANY MORE.

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Guest Zane

I can define today's media.

 

Lazy, non-vestigating, pontificating blowhards that will sell their soul for money.

 

What happenned to the news reporters that would go to hell to find the truth.

 

Everyone knows that race is a classification system to keep the lower economic class down.

 

My question is who are the people maintaining the system.

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I can define today's media.

 

Lazy, non-vestigating, pontificating blowhards that will sell their soul for money.

 

What happenned to the news reporters that would go to hell to find the truth.

 

Everyone knows that race is a classification system to keep the lower economic class down.

 

My question is who are the people maintaining the system.

 

I personally think that Obama has alot to be proud of. He has demonstrated that racial barriers have come down in many states. He is leading the number of delegates.

 

To me this video states the truth about racism without a single word.

 

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Guest Zane

That is a nice video, but it only illustrates my point. White America does not want to talk about it past. This video displays we are all universal in our desires. But, the video fails to is that White America thinks they are normal and everyone else that does not fit what they deem normal is a deviant.

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Guest LAW_*
I can define today's media.

 

Lazy, non-vestigating, pontificating blowhards that will sell their soul for money.

 

What happenned to the news reporters that would go to hell to find the truth.

 

Everyone knows that race is a classification system to keep the lower economic class down.

 

My question is who are the people maintaining the system.

 

After tonight's Fake Presidential Debate I would have to say ABC Disney is helping maintain the system. Looks like the leaders at Disney are trying to get Hillary in by any means available. I wonder if Americans realize that Walt Disney was was considered racist. Just ask people that knew him about hiring African Americans at his Magical Kingdom. Then again the current President of the Walt Disney Company, Robert A. Iger supported the racist fearmongers Melanie Morgan and Brian Sussman on KSFO radio in San Francisco.

 

Melanie Morgan co-host on "Halfrican" Obama

 

Melanie Morgan referred to Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) as an, "as you call, 'Halfrican.' " Sussman responded, "Halfrican ... his father was from Kenya, his mother's white." He added that, "in my opinion -- 'cause my opinion is your average white guy," Obama "is not allowed to wear the African-American badge because his family are not the descendants of slaves, OK?

 

http://mediamatters.org/items/200612070006

 

This fake debate displayed a former Clinton Official George Stephanopolous taking que from Sean Hannity on asking Obama about his relationship with Weather Underground leader Bill Ayers. Karl "Bush Brain" Rove made this statement week ago that the Obama Ayers connection should be investigated. Obama is being charged that Ayers introduced him the to local activists at a meeting in his house during his senate election bid. He also donated $200 to Obama’s reelection campaign in 2001.

 

It is now obvious that the Right Wing does not want to compete with Barack in the general election, so they are trying to pull all their media strings to get him out now if possible. They are making strategic posts.

 

KARL ROVE ON AYERS - Obama's Relationship With Him Should Not Be Ignored.

Apr 9, 2008 9:00 PM

 

Obama's link to Weather Underground leader Bill Ayers should be investigated according to Karl Rove. His goal to bomb and blow up government offices should not be ignored. Hannity said that it took a year to expose the atrocities of Wright enough to have any reaction by the media, he hopes that Obama's friendship with Ayers won't take so long. America Wake Up

 

http://www.oprah.com/community/thread/49978

 

Karl Rove on Obama's Tie to Terrorist

Thursday, April 10, 2008

 

ROVE: Well, I also understand they were associates, that he was a political supporter of his. But, look, I think the first thing is find out what kind of relationship they actually had. Let's hear from the Obama camp, and let's hear from Ayers about the kind of relationship they had.

 

But look, it's not — the point that you started with, that Obama was only 8-years-old when this man committed these violent acts. Well, he was an adult and might have had a relationship with him. Let's see if there is a relationship that continues to this day and see how close it is.

 

The fact that Obama was 8-years-old doesn't excuse Professor Ayers from the violent acts and the hatred he had for our country in the 1970s and apparently is unrepentant about today.

 

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,349408,00.html

 

Woods Fund of Chicago is a grantmaking foundation whose goal is to increase opportunities for less advantaged people and communities in the metropolitan area, including the opportunity to shape decisions affecting them. The foundation works primarily as a funding partner with nonprofit organizations. Woods supports nonprofits in their important roles of engaging people in civic life, addressing the causes of poverty and other challenges facing the region, promoting more effective public policies, reducing racism and other barriers to equal opportunity, and building a sense of community and common ground.

 

http://www.woodsfund.org

 

360 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600

Chicago, Illinois 60601-3806

Telephone: (312) 782-2698

Fax: (312) 782-4155

 

Senator Obama was a director of the Woods Fund board from 1999 to Dec. 11, 2002,

 

2008 Board of Directors and Officers

 

Laura S. Washington, Board Chair*

Ida B. Wells-Barnett University Professor and Fellow of the DePaul Humanities Center

 

Jesus G. Garcia, Vice Chair*

Executive Director, Little Village Community Development Corporation

 

William C. Ayers

Distinguished Professor of Education, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Lee Bey

Director of Media and Governmental Affairs, Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill LLP

 

Doris Salomon Chagin

Category Manager - Ethnic Markets, BP Products North America

 

Beth E. Richie

Professor and Head of the Department of African American Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Patrick M. Sheahan

Executive Director, Public Affairs, UBS Investment Bank

 

Charles N. Wheatley

President, Sahara Enterprises, Inc.

 

Lucia Woods Lindley

Board Member Emeritus

 

 

William C. ("Bill") Ayers (born 1944) is a Professor of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was a 1960s-era political activist and former member of the Weather Underground.

Ayers grew up in Glen Ellyn, a suburb of Chicago, in a highly privileged family (his father, Thomas Ayers, was Chairman and CEO of Commonwealth Edison) and attended Lake Forest Academy. According to his memoir, he became radicalized at the University of Michigan where he became involved in the New Left and the SDS. He briefly worked as a schoolteacher.

 

Ayers joined the Weather Underground in 1969, but went underground with several associates after the Greenwich Village townhouse explosion in 1970 which killed three members (Ted Gold, Terry Robbins, and Diana Oughton, who was Ayers' girlfriend at the time). While underground, he and fellow member Bernardine Dohrn had two children, Zayd and Malik. They were purged from the group in the mid-1970s, and turned themselves into the authorities in 1981 when all charges against him were dropped because of prosecutorial misconduct during the long search for the fugitives. They married, and later became legal guardians of Chesa Boudin, the biological son of former Weathermen David Gilbert and Kathy Boudin, after his parents were arrested for their part in the Brinks robbery (1981). In the 1980s Ayers undertook graduate training in education and earned his doctorate in 1987. Since 1999 Ayers has served on the board of the Woods Fund of Chicago, a philanthropic foundation for education. He has edited and written nearly a dozen books on education theory, policy and practice.

 

Weatherman, known colloquially as the Weathermen and later the Weather Underground Organization, was a violent U.S. Radical Left group consisting of splintered-off members and leaders of the Students for a Democratic Society which formed on the campus on the University of Michigan in the 1960s. They took their name from a line from the Bob Dylan song 'Subterranean Homesick Blues' "You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows." The group referred to itself as a revolutionary organization of men and women whose purpose was to carry out a series of attacks that would achieve the revolutionary overthrow of the Government of the United States.[citation needed] Their attacks were mostly bombings of government buildings. The Weathermen imploded shortly after the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam in 1973 and the conquest of South Vietnam by the communist North in 1975, which saw the general decline of the New Left, of which Weatherman had been a part.

 

Early on, the Weathermen were part of the Revolutionary Youth Movement within the Students for a Democratic Society. When they split — first from the RYM's Maoists and then from SDS itself — they distinguished themselves from other self-proclaimed revolutionary groups by claiming that there was no time to build a vanguard party and that revolutionary war against the United States and the capitalist system should begin immediately. To that end, they carried out a domestic terror campaign in the United States, consisting of bombings, jailbreaks, and riots.

 

The John F. Kennedy School of Government's 2007 "National Leadership Index" showed that confidence in the press is lower than confidence in any other institution. 64% of Americans said that they don't trust the media's coverage of the presidential campaign. 88% said the news media focuses too much on trivial issues. 83% said that corporations have too much influence over the press, and 76% said journalists don't make enough effort to get the whole story.

 

http://www.hks.harvard.edu/leadership/imag...ndex%202007.pdf

 

I hope the Internet will be the freedom torch to open American's eyes on what is really going on. This is not Blacks vs. Whites, Republicans vs. Democrats. this is Americans vs. the Corporate Machine. It is time to call on the DNC and the RNC to not allow the Networks to host debates.

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Guest The Knights Party

The United States of America is a great nation! How great will we be should a traitor take office as President? Is America headed down a dangerous path? We believe so. While we do not take an official position toward any candidate, we feel that we represent the opinion of many dissatisfied people throughout the country who worry for the future of their children. Will anyone, be it Republican or Democrat, stand up and voice their support for white Christian Americans?

 

Rachel Pendergraft, the national spokeswoman for the The Knights Party said, "We pray for the day when we will see a strong candidate; a God fearing white man or woman, who will restore the principles of the Constitution, promote free enterprise versus a planned economy, put military troops on the border to stop illegal immigration, put an end to the social experiment called forced integration which has had a devastating effect on all races, and return our schools to a wholesome environment of learning by removing homosexual indoctrination."

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Guest Atom

Africans have 5 less cubic inches of brain than caucasians, on average. Scientific fact. Asians have 1 more cubic inch of brain than caucasians, also fact.

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Guest human_*

My God!!!!!!!! Where do you people come out of the wood work from?

Oh!!! and does this mean that you wont go to the Anglo American Directory that I "A latino" am putting together??????????????????

 

It's forreal,Everyone else has one. When a white guy looked at me and asked me if one existed for anglo americans? I told him no.

 

So I thought to myself "Why not?" Why not put one together "No one else has done it".

 

 

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Africans have 5 less cubic inches of brain than caucasians, on average. Scientific fact. Asians have 1 more cubic inch of brain than caucasians, also fact.

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