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ILOVEDC

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About ILOVEDC

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  1. I think Fenty is the best candidate for mayor. He is well respected and has fresh ideas to improve our educucation system.
  2. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy (DOE) have jointly awarded nine grants totaling $5.7 million for biobased fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuel resources. Bodman commented, "These research projects build upon DOE's strategic investments in genomics, to accelerate scientific discovery and promote the development of alternative energy sources vital to America's energy and economic security." "To be a reliable renewable energy source, farmers and ranchers will need to be able to grow biomass in large quantities," Johanns said. "This joint research initiative will address our nation's need for alternative energy resources and improve the efficiency with which biomass and plant feedstocks are used to produce renewable fuels such as ethanol." USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES) and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) awarded the grants. CSREES and OBER jointly initiated this fundamental research program to facilitate the use of woody plant tissue, specifically lignocellulosic materials, for bioenergy or biofuels. The research projects will focus on poplar, alfalfa, sorghum, wheat and other grasses. This is the first year CSREES and OBER have solicited competitive grants in this joint program. DOE is funding six projects for a total of nearly $3.9 million. USDA granted more than $1.8 million to fund three projects. Initial funding will support research projects for up to three years. Awards have been given to: Purdue University, Ind., $1.4 million. The Noble Foundation, Okla., $800,000. Texas A&M University, Texas, $800,000. USDA-Agricultural Research Service, University of Wisconsin, $333,000. Carnegie Institute of Washington, $359,100. Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, $300,000. North Carolina State University, $700,000. Kansas State University, $700,000. University of Georgia, $445,000. CSREES advances knowledge for agriculture, the environment, human health and well-being, and communities by supporting research, education and extension programs in the Land-Grant University System and other partner organizations. Visit http://www.csrees.usda.gov for more information. OBER manages a diverse portfolio of research to develop fundamental biological information and to advance technology in support of DOE's missions in biology, medicine and the environment. Visit http://sc.doe.gov/ober/ober_top.html for more information.
  3. The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Interior today announced that routine surveillance has indicated the presence of H5 and N1 avian influenza subtypes in samples from two wild mute swans in Michigan, but testing has ruled out the possibility of this being the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain that has spread through birds in Asia, Europe and Africa. Test results thus far indicate this is low pathogenicity avian influenza, which poses no threat to human health. The swans were sampled as part of the expanded avian influenza surveillance program. They were showing no signs of sickness, which suggests that this is low pathogenicity avian influenza. Additionally, genetic analysis of the virus conducted at USDA's National Veterinary Services laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, suggests that it is similar to a low pathogenicity strain that has been found in North America. It is possible that these birds were not infected with an H5N1 strain, but instead with two separate avian influenza viruses, one containing H5 and the other containing N1. The confirmatory testing underway at NVSL will clarify whether one or more strains of the virus are present, the specific subtype, as well as pathogenicity. These results are expected within two weeks and will be made public when completed. It should be noted that wild birds are known to harbor many influenza viruses, and the finding of one or more of these viruses during routine testing is not unusual. The swans were sampled August 8 at the Mouillee state game area located on the coast of Lake Erie in Monroe County, Michigan. The samples were taken by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service personnel as part of an expanded wild bird monitoring program. The Departments of Agriculture and Interior are working collaboratively with States to sample wild birds throughout the United States for the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza. Initial screening tests on the swan samples were conducted by Michigan State University's Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health--part of USDA's National Animal Health Laboratory Network. These tests indicated the presence of an H5 avian influenza virus. Confirmatory testing at NVSL confirmed the H5 and the N1. This testing also suggests, but has not yet confirmed, that this is low pathogenicity avian influenza. Low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) commonly occurs in wild birds, where it typically causes only minor symptoms or no noticeable symptoms. These strains of the virus are not a human health concern. This includes LPAI H5N1, commonly referred to as the North American H5N1. This strain of low pathogenicity avian influenza is very different from the more severe HPAI H5N1 circulating overseas, which is commonly referred to as the Asian H5N1. Evidence of LPAI H5N1 has been found on two occasions in wild birds in the United States. In 1975 and 1986, it was detected in wild ducks. These detections occurred as part of routine sampling. LPAI H5N1 has also been detected in Canada, most recently in 2005.
  4. The U.S. Senate ratified the Council of Europe's Convention on Cyber Crime, the first multinational, multilateral treaty to require cooperation among law enforcement agencies in the investigation and prosecution of computer network crimes. The treaty has more than 40 signatory nations, including Canada, Japan, South Africa, the United States and the countries of Europe, and was supported by, among others, the Information Technology Association of America, the Cyber Security Industry Alliance, and the Business Software Alliance (BSA). The Convention is the first international treaty on crimes committed via the Internet and other computer networks, and deals particularly with infringements of copyright, computer-related fraud, child **inappropriate material**ography and violations of network security. Its stated main objective, set out in the preamble, is to pursue a common criminal policy aimed at the protection of society against cybercrime, especially by adopting appropriate legislation and fostering international co-operation. The Convention also contains a series of powers and procedures such as the search of computer networks and interception. Additionally, it has been supplemented by an Additional Protocol intended to make any publication of racist and xenophobic propaganda via computer networks a criminal offence. The Council of Europe's own summary of the Convention on Cybercrime reads as follows: The Convention is the first international treaty on crimes committed via the Internet and other computer networks, dealing particularly with infringements of copyright, computer-related fraud, child **inappropriate material**ography and violations of network security. It also contains a series of powers and procedures such as the search of computer networks and interception. Its main objective, set out in the preamble, is to pursue a common criminal policy aimed at the protection of society against cybercrime, especially by adopting appropriate legislation and fostering international co-operation. The Convention is the product of four years of work by Council of Europe experts, but also by the United States, Canada, Japan and other countries which are not members of the Organisation. It has been supplemented by an Additional Protocol making any publication of racist and xenophobic propaganda via computer networks a criminal offence.
  5. ILOVEDC

    Avian Flu Epidemic

    Indonesia has reported two deaths from avian influenza this week, bringing the country's death toll from the disease to 44. The island nation now has the dubious honor of being the worst bird flu-hit country in the world. The World Health Organization confirmed that a 17-year-old girl from Jakarta province and a 6-year-old boy from West Java province had succumbed to the potentially fatal disease, which has killed at least 138 people since it was initially reported to be affecting humans in 2003. According to WHO, the boy, Megi Saputra, died Monday. He had been in regular contact with sick and dying chickens -- later found to be carrying an H5 strain of avian influenza -- in his home, authorities said. After falling ill, he was initially told he was sick with typhoid. Avian flu was only raised as a possibility several days after symptoms first appeared, by which point it was too late to save his life. Members of his family and others with whom he was in close contact have been put under medical surveillance. CNN.com quoted Megi's mother, Sadiah Saputra, as saying: "I knew about bird flu from the TV and radio, but when my son got sick I had no clue it was bird flu. I had no idea he was going to leave me." The girl, whose name has not yet been released to the media, died Tuesday. She kept pigeons in her home, and lived in an area where many kept poultry. Local flocks are currently being tested for signs of H5N1 infection. "Animal health authorities have collected samples from birds in the neighborhood and these will be tested as part of the continuing investigation," the WHO said in a statement. Meanwhile: -- Vietnamese state media reported early Friday that there had been an outbreak of an H5 strain of avian influenza among poultry in the south of the country. Dong Manh Hoa, head of the Ho Chi Minh City Regional Veterinary Centre, told Saigon Giai Phong newspaper that infected ducks and geese had been found in Tien Giang, Long An and Ben Tre provinces. It is believed that this outbreak -- which may yet be revealed to be of a different variety than the highly publicized H5N1, although that is doubtful -- is the result of the disease remaining dormant in many waterfowl, which are still being raised by significant numbers of Vietnamese farmers in the Mekong Delta despite official bans in place till early 2007. Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung Thursday urged officials "to focus strongly on instructing and deploying forces to carry out synchronized, preventive measures" in counteracting the spread of avian influenza. -- Indonesia has culled 5.9 million birds in response to the latest news of avian influenza outbreaks in the country, Agriculture Minister Anton Apriantono has said. Speaking following a Jakarta meeting for bird flu response coordination at the offices of the Coordinating Minister for People's Welfare earlier this week, he said: "Besides that, the government has also provided free vaccines for 262 million birds." Despite routine surveillance being conducted by the government, the minister said, the fact that 30 million Indonesian households kept birds meant that controlling outbreaks and the potential spread of the disease remained an ongoing problem. "However, there's no guarantee that culling will totally stop the spread of the virus, but it definitely will reduce cases of infection in both poultry and humans," he said. "The key word should be 'bio-security.' People should increase the sanitation of their backyard farms." -- China this week confirmed earlier suspicions, raised by a letter printed in the New England Journal of Medicine in June, that the country's first case of an avian influenza fatality in a human -- in 2003 -- had originally been attributed to the SARS outbreak which was affecting the country at the time. According to Chinese Vice Minister of Health Jiang Zuojun, who was speaking at a press conference, the mix-up occurred as a result of communications problems between the scientific and research communities and government agencies. An investigation into the issue revealed that the man who died, a soldier, had been examined by military scientists upon his death. H5N1 was detected, but government agencies were not informed. "This issue has exposed problems in our scientific research organizations," he said. "Their communications with disease prevention organizations should be strengthened in future." Jiang said the military scientists considered the cause of the man's death -- believed by the WHO to be the first case of human avian influenza infection in the world -- as a puzzle to be solved, and added that the H5N1 diagnosis was reached slowly and cautiously. "At the time, we had incomplete standards for diagnosis. ... From the data we have at hand, which starts from 2003, that was the first case," the minister said.
  6. I just wanted to say that I think the District has come along way since I was a kid. I remember when people used to get beat up on 14th. Now its nice. Everywhere I am seeing positive change. Thanks Mayor.
  7. ILOVEDC

    Usa Government Sucks!

    I agree with not sure. We are not perfect, but we are the best.
  8. What type of machines are that?
  9. Here is the type of bomb they planning to make. "This liquid explosive type of attack is particularly worrying," Peter Neumann, director of the Centre for Defence Studies at London's King's College university, said. "Planes remain vulnerable and in the coming weeks terrorists will be thinking of something else to do that we have no idea about," he said. Neumann said the suspected plot appeared similar to a 1995 plan to blow up 11 planes using nitroglycerine mixed in contact lens solution and a battery powered detonator hidden in a shoe. That's two posts now.
  10. ILOVEDC

    Win Counting Crows and Goo Goo Dolls Concert Tickets

    I love the Goo Goo Dolls. You might as hand them over to me. I am going to win those tickets.
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