Jump to content
Washington DC Message Boards

11g

Patriot
  • Content count

    1
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About 11g

  • Rank
    Transient
  1. 11g, a consumer research group, is seeking people to talk to about investigations, true crime, and mysteries. We will be conducting in-person interviews on Monday, September 23rd and Tuesday, September 24th within Washington D.C. proper. Interviews will last about 60-90 minutes and you will be compensated $100 cash for your time. If you are interested in taking part in our research study, please fill out the form at: https://11g.wufoo.com/forms/investigations-true-crime-mysteries/ Note: To be considered for this study, you must be at least 21 years old and live or work in the District of Columbia. We are looking for people who identify with the following profiles. No mystery left unsolved Unsolved cases get under your skin. You're sure the detectives overlooked some crucial detail. You need to know the motivation behind the crime and you refuse to believe mysteries and investigations can go unsolved. The answer is out there and you are determined to find it through your own sources and sleuthing skills. True crime TV devotee If only America's Most Wanted could air again! Goodfellas, Law & Order, Gone Girl...it's all the daydreams of Hollywood writers. You're only interested in juicy stories, the stuff that actually happened to real people. Your TV is always set to CourtTV or Discovery ID, everything else is a waste when real drama can unfold before you 24/7. Crime logger You've been keeping track of mysteries and investigations for as long as you can remember. In the beginning you clipped from the newspaper and recorded specials on TV. Now you bookmark every relevant news website, follow sources on social media or maybe set up Google alerts so you can digest every bit of crime information online. You don't just consume this information, you amass and catalogue it in an effort to identify trends. Avoiding all crime media Crime has taken over the news and TV programming. You are appalled so much energy goes to reporting what is negative and the lengths to which the media celebrates fictional and real crooks. You believe crime breeds crime. You may have children or grandchildren and are actively prevent what media they comsume to limit their exposure to crime. Connecting with the accused People accused or convicted of a serious crime are still human beings, and they need love just like anyone else. Maybe you've started a correspondence with a prisoner, perhaps you visit them at the penitentiary. You see through the accusations, judgments, and headlines and believe everyone deserves a friend. The courtroom is my ultimate spectator sport Watching the proceedings from the spectator's gallery is a regular pastime for you, so much so that you've lost count of how many cases you have watched live. Sure, it's not as flashy and quick-paced as it is on TV, but there's nothing like seeing the witness's testimony, evidence revealed and lawyers battling before your very eyes. Citizen on patrol There are never going to be enough police on the street to protect everyone all the time. That's where you come in. You might issue citizen's arrests, patrol the streets when an Amber Alert goes out or even exert a little vigilante justice. Your town is safer with you in it, even if you don't get credit for it. No longer entertained by crime You used to enjoy a good crime story or investigation like anyone else, but that all changed when your circumstances changed. Maybe you moved to a crime-ridden neighborhood, or perhaps your career exposed you to the dark side of crime. Something changed in your life and in light of that, you no longer view crime as entertainment. Scanning for crime as it happens When sirens blare through the streets, you know what happened and where. Using a police scanner or simply monitoring social media, you tune into the raw information the police or the community are reporting about a crime in progress before it even makes the news.
×