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  2. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    Zakat is obligatory of every Adult free Muslim man and woman provided the above two conditions are fulfilled. According to Imam Malik, Shafie and Imam Ahmed bin Hanbal, Zakat is obligatory of the wealth of the Minor and insane person, and it has to be paid by the guardian. Where as according to Imam Abu Hanafi it is not obligatory. Since Zakat is an act of worship the intention is a must and hence it is not obligatory on the wealth of a minor and the insane person. According to Imam Abu Hanafi and Imam Malik, the wife need not pay Zakat on the Mehr amount still due by her husband. However Zakat will have bo be paid on the amount she has claimed provided it is equivalent to or more than the Nisab and on which one year has been completed. According to Imam Shafie the wife has to pay the Zakat every year (though she herself is not claiming the Mehr, even though it can be claimed). According to Hanbali the Wife has to pay the Zakat for the entire number of years at the time when she gets it. All types of goods for sale, whatever may be its form, whether hand made or machine products or fruits or books or jewellery or clothes or cattle or property brought with the intention of buying and selling etc., are liable for zakat. Provided it is in one�s possession for one complete lunar year and the rate of zakat applicable is 2 1/2% on its total value. The prescribed limit on goods is after conversion, in terms of its value, the total amount thus evaluated must be equivalent to the price of 634 grams of silver. If less, then zakat is not obligatory . لماذا لا يسمح للمرأة ان تطلق زوجها في الاسلام ؟ - ذاكر نايك Dr Zakir Naik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87P0Lv166Bs تعريف الاله من غير القرآن - ذاكر نايك Zakir Naik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sQbG8bjiLg هل من الضروري اعتناق الاسلام لدخول الجنة ؟ - ذاكر نايك Zakir Naik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HreBda_MUHU
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  4. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    There are two conditions for Zakat to be obligatory on the wealth. 1. Being in possession of Nisab i.e. possessing property in excess of a minimum exemption limit. 2. On completion of one Lunar year on the wealth. According to Hanafi if a person possess wealth equal to or in surplus of Nisab in the beginning and at the end of the lunar year, (even though in between the year, the wealth was less than the Nisab), Zakat is obligatory, but if at the end of the lunar year if the wealth is less than the Nisab (though one had wealth equal to or in surplus during the year) zakat is not obligatory. According to Shafie the passage of one lunar year is a must on the wealth (Nisab) (in Hanbali almost a year). The zakat is calculated on the day on which a year is completed on that wealth (Nisab). Nisab: Zakat is paid on the surplus of wealth which is left over after the passage of a year(Lunar Year). It is thus a payment on the accumulated wealth, leaving our animal and agricultural yield. Zakat is pain at almost a uniform rate of 2 1/2%. The minimum standard of surplus of wealth over which Zakat is charged is known as Nisab. It differs with different kinds of property. In case of silver it is 52 1/2 Tolas (634 grams), in case of gold it is 7 1/2 Tolas (88 grams). The Nisab for cash is the same as that of gold and silver. لماذا يخلق الله المعاقين والفقراء - د ذاكر نايك Dr Zakir Naik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Me7-Gt9MWXs أيهما أفضل الدفن أم الحرق"ذاكر نايك"- which is better burn or bury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxK35OMEtjE
  5. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    13* If a person deserving Zakat is thought to be embarrassed in accepting it, the Zakat money could be given to him as a gift or present on a suitable occasion; but the intention of the giver must be of Zakat at the time of giving the money. Similarly, to give Zakat money as a gift to the children of the poor is also permissible. 14* If a person owes you money and is unable to repay it on account of poverty, you cannot pay yourself his debt with your own Zakat money and consider that the obligation of paying Zakat has been discharged. Zakat money must be handed to the debtor and payment asked for thereafter. 15* The amount of Zakat given to any one person should not be less than what could satisfy his needs for atleast one day. 16* If Zakat money is given to a person whom you thought deserved it but later found out that he does not, the obligation of paying Zakat will be discharged and you will not have to pay Zakat again. 17* If a person is not entitled to Zakat and is given Zakat money, then he should refuse to accept it: or if given, he should return it to the giver immediately because it is forbidden for him to accept Zakat. 18* The first claim on Zakat money is of deserving relatives, then the deserving poor of the village, town, city or country in which one lives. If the needs of the people of another area are more deserving and urgent, the Zakat could be sent to them too. 19* If the giver is doubtful about the position of the person seeking Zakat, then he should not give his Zakat to him at all, because the giving of Zakat in such circumstances is not permitted. أجمل رد على الإسلاموفوبيا Best answer to Islamophobia ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1ivAgab6nE الحلقة 3 برنامج ( #وياكم3 ) محمد العوضي ( لقاء مع الأمريكي خا ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9bd8qwowCI
  6. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    7* The determination of the minimum Nisab on trade goods will be according to the value of the goods in cash which would purchase 7 1/2 tolas of gold (88 gram) or 52 1/2 tolas of silver (632 gram). 8* When trading in partnership, each partner will be liable to pay Zakat on the proportion of the net share of profits coming to him which is added to his capital. 9* Zakat on shares owned by one shall be determined annually on the cash realisable market value of the shares, which must be included in the capital and Zakat paid on the total as required by Islam. 10* Persons who buy goods on credit for the purpose of trade must deduct the total amount of their debts and determine their net profits, and add these to their capital for calculating the payment of Zakat. 11* Money saved for Haj is also liable for Zakat if it is kept for a year or more and is within the Nisab. 12* If someone gives Zakat money to a person as a loan but makes niyyat (intention) of Zakat, then the obligation of paying Zakat will be discharged. He cannot thereafter collect the money given away as a loan. is belief enough - أسئلة دينية محيرة - د. بلال فيلبس - مترجم ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trdnkqE5MI4 وحدة الأديان - خالد ياسين - مترجم Peaceful Coexistence (Ca ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YYiEwy0Z68
  7. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    cases 1* If a person earns money from a fixed property but the whole amount is spent in the course of the year, then he does not become liable to pay Zakat. But if he has saved a portion of the income and if this saving reaches or exceeds the minimum Nisab limit, then he will be liable to pay Zakat, provided the amount in question remains in his possession for 12 months. (Lunar) 2* If a person owns buildings other than those meant for his own or his dependants use, and he has rented them out to others, the he will have to pay Zakat on the net income from the rent, provided the income is above the minimum Nisab limit and remains in his possession for 12 months. 3* The value of any vehicle used in the course of trade to earn a living is exempt from the obligation of Zakat. But the net income earned from its use, and which remains with the owner for one full year, will be subject to payment of Zakat. 4* There is no Zakat on farmland owned by a person, irrespective of the amount of its value or its size, provided it is not bought for speculation. 5* The capital involved in goods, properties and livestock owned for trade or commerce is subject to the payment of Zakat: that is, if a person began trading with a capital of Rs.50,000 and earned profits thereon, then he will have to pay Zakat on the total amount, and not just on the profits earned. 6* Therefore, a person having a capital of Rs. 50,000 and earned Rs. 50,000 profits in due course will have to pay Zakat on Rs. 60,000 (capital plus profit), which will be the total amount reflected in the balance-sheet. Who is eligible for Zakat? – Ramadan Essentials | Islamic Relief UK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgH_b1HpAug الحياة مثل ركوب قطار - الشيخ خالد ياسين (مترجم) Life Is Li ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8X2uGHGfPc
  8. Luke_Wilbur

    The Didache (The Teaching) 2nd Revision

    Rulers established their legacy not only by building great structures. Rulers also passed on Wisdom literature to teach their offspring and future leaders the concepts divinity and virtue. Sebayt (Teaching, Didache) is considered an Egyptian form of Wisdom Literature. The Maxims of Ptahhotep or Instruction of Ptahhotep (2500 - 2400 BC) is considered the oldest collection of wisdom literature in the world written by composed by the Vizier Ptahhotep, during the rule of King Izezi of the Fifth Dynasty. The only complete surviving copy of the Maxims of Ptahhotep was is inscribed on what is known as the Prisse Papyrus,, was obtained by the French orientalist Émile Prisse d'Avennes at Thebes in 1856 and is now in the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris. Ptahhotep considered the heart (ka) the way to measure life, prosperity and health. Those with the strongest heart are those that listen, understand and follow the laws given to keep order (Ma'at) in ones life. The one who listens to to those that do not follow law and order other, but looks for only pleasures to the body will grow a weak heart and only know death, punishment and appear foolish to others. Papyrus Prisse Usermaatre Amenemope was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 21st Dynasty. The Sebayt of Amenemope (Didache of Amenomope or Teaching of Amenemope) is pharonic wisdom literature thought to have been written before 1000 BC. during the Ramesside Period, when the tribes of Israel first became a unified nation. It has been suggested that Hebrew literature shares similar thought and expressions of Didactic treatises of Egypt and Babylon with The Sebayt of Amenemope often cited as the foremost example. Teaching of Amenemope Prologue Teaching of Amenemope Chapter I - The Sabayt Mishlei - Proverbs - Chapter 9 Mishlei - Proverbs - Chapter 5 In ancient Egyptian beliefs, serpents were considered both protectors and enemies of the people. The cobra is most often represented as the Uraeus, the fiercely protective serpent seen guarding the foreheads of Deities, kings, and queens. East of Alexandria, in the city of Dep the Uraeus was known as Wadjet, the serpent goddess often depicted as a cobra. The Ancient Egyptian word Wadj signifies blue and green. Wadjet is also the name for the well-known Eye of the Moon. Indeed, in later times, she was often depicted simply as a woman with a cobra's head, or as a woman wearing the Uraeus. The Uraeus originally had been her body alone, which wrapped around or was coiled upon the head of the pharaoh or another deity. She became the patroness of the Nile Delta and the protector of all of Lower Egypt. The Uraeus was the protector of the pharaoh and was believed to spit fire at enemies from its place on the forehead. Wadjet had a twin sister known as Nekhbet, who was the patron of the city of Nekheb (her name meaning of Nekheb) and later became the patron of Upper Egypt. She takes the form of woman with the head of a vulture, a woman with a vulture headdress or simply just white vulture symbolizing purity. Together, they represented the Uraeus – the two ladies (nebty) protecting the pharaoh and all of Egypt. When Egypt became one, these goddesses were believed to be present during the crowning of a pharaoh and their symbols were found the front of the crown itself. In this light, her role as a protector extended to common people as well. and one of the two patron deities for all of Ancient Egypt when it was unified. Apophis (Apep) was the ancient Egyptian deity who embodied chaos (ı͗zft in Egyptian) and was thus the opponent of light and Ma'at (order/truth). He appears in art as a giant serpent. Teaching of Amenemope Chapter 8 : speak no evil The Literature Of Ancient Egypt The Story of Sinuhe Khnum was originally a water god who was thought to rule over all water, including the rivers and lakes of the underworld. He was associated with the source of the Nile, and ensured that the inundation deposited enough precious black silt onto the river banks to make them fertile. Khnum was similar to the the Creator's Holy Spirit as the Lord of Life of the body and the "ka" (spirit) of each newborn child. (52) his emotions & passions are constantly in a state of arousal ; Chapter 9 : avoid the heated CHAPTER 9 Do not fraternize with the hot-tempered man, Nor approach him to converse. Safeguard your tongue from talking back to your superior, And take care not to offend him. Do not allow him to cast words only to entrap you,30 And be not too free31 in your replies; With a man of your own station discuss the reply; 11,20 And take care of 4speaking thoughtlessly5; 12,1 When a man’s heart is upset, words travel faster Than wind over water. He is ruined and created by his tongue,32 When he speaks slander; He makes an answer deserving of a beating, For his freight is damaged. He sails among all the world,33 But his cargo is false words; He acts the ferryman in twisting words:34 12,10 He goes forth and comes back arguing. But whether he eats or whether he drinks inside, His accusation (waits for him) outside. The day when his evil deed is brought to court Is a disaster for his children. Even Khnum will straightway come against him, even Khnum will straightway come against him,35 The potter of the ill-tempered man, 13,1 For he sets families to argue. He goes before all the winds like clouds, He changes his hue in the sun; He crocks his tail like a baby crocodile, He curls himself up to inflict harm, His lips are sweet, but his tongue is bitter, And fire burns inside him. Do not fly up to join that man Not fearing you will be brought to account. Chapter 10 : say what You think without injuring CHAPTER 10 Do not address an intemperate man in your (unrighteousness) 36 Nor destroy your own mind; Do not say to him, ‘‘May you be praised,’’ not meaning it When there is fear within you Do not converse falsely with a man, For it is the abomination of God. Do not separate your mind from your tongue,37 All your plans will succeed.38 You will be important before others,39 14, 1 While you will be secure in the hand of God. God hates one who falsifies words, His great abomination is duplicity Chapter 11 : abuse no poor Chapter 17 : do not corrupt the measure Chapter 21 : be reticent Like the Egyptian concept of Ma'at (Order) and Apepi (Disorder), In the Talmud (Tractate Berakoth Folio 5a) Jews believe that the soul of person has both a good spirit (Yezter hatov, impulse, inclination, instinct, genii) and a evil spirit (Yezter hara, impulse, inclination instinct, genii) battling for control.The problem, however, arises when one makes a willful choice to "cross over the line," and seeks to gratify the evil spirits. Rabbi Levi explains the meaning to King David's wisdom on how to maintain Selah (balance, Ma'at) in one's life by praying to the Creator for help to transform our Yezter hara into a good force in our life. Tractate Berakoth Folio 5a Proverbs (especially the sentence literature of chs. 10ff. ) shows "a general parallelism of thought" with Egyptian and Babylonian Instruction. Sebayt (Manuel de Codage transcription: sbA.yt)[1] is the ancient Egyptian term for a genre of pharaonic literature. The word literally means 'teachings' or 'instructions'[2] and refers to formally written ethical teachings focused on the "way of living truly". he book of Proverbs was principally written by King Solomon, David’s son, around 900 BC. Wisdom literature is one of the most important classes of texts from the ancient civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia and sufficient examples survive to illustrate both the different national or cultural preferences and, at the same time, the underlying similarity of thought and expression Helck says, "that Proverbs 22:17-23:11 is largely dependent on the Teaching of Amenemope is now generally accepted".27 Erman demonstrated that the Teaching of Amenemope was closely parallel with the portion of Proverb sometimes subtitled "Words of the Wise" (22:17-24:22) the belly is the home of our passions, emotions, feelings and states of arousal & rest - our sage promotes tranquility ; He has mastered the "inner" conflict between his passions and his mind, namely between the icons of emotions and the symbols of proto-rational cognition, between "belly" and "heart". Egyptian Instructions (both pre-Demotic and Demotic) present collections of maxims and teachings on moral living, these max Amun is first mentioned in the Pyramid Texts (c. 2400-2300) as a local god of Thebes along with his consort Amaunet. Amun as "The Obscure One" left room for people to define him according to their own understanding of what they needed him to be. A god who represented darkness could not also represent light, nor a god of water stand for dryness, etc. A god who personified the mysterious hidden nature of existence, however, could lend himself to any aspect of that existence; and this is precisely what happened with Amun. During the Twelfth dynasty, the New Kingdom the god Amun rose to prominence. In the city of Thebes. Atum was fused with Ra into Amun-Ra. . In his role as Amun-Ra, the god combines his invisible aspect (symbolized by the wind which one cannot see but is aware of) and his visible aspect as the life-giving sun. In Amun, the most important aspects of both Ra and Atum were combined to establish an all-encompassing deity whose aspects were literally every facet of creation. Statue of the ram of Amun Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford This life-sized statue of a ram, the sacred animal of the god Amun, was one of a pair that flanked a threshold in Taharqa’s temple at Kawa c. 680 BC. The base is carved with a hieroglyphic inscription proclaiming the king to be the son of the god Amun. A small figure of Taharqa stands protected under the ram’s chin. Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire Drusilla Dunjee Houston CHAPTER V. PREHISTORIC EGYPT, THE LAND OF WONDERS. Relief depicting the ram-headed Amun-ra on a shrine erected by Kushite King Taharqa in the court of the Temple of Amun built by him at Kawa in Nubia. Late Period, 25th Dynasty, 690-64 BC. NUBIAN PHARAOHS AND MEROITIC KINGS THE KINGDOM OF KUSH NECIA DESIREE HARKLESS p.16 Diodorus is an invaluable source on the history of Egypt and Ethiopia. What does he say about the Ethiopians? “Now the Ethiopians, as historians relate, were the fi rst of all men and proofs of the statement are manifest. For they did not come into their country as immigrants from abroad but were the natives of it and so justly bear the name of Autochone...Th ey that dwell beneath the noonday sun were in all likelihood the fi rst to be generated by the earth... it is reasonable to suppose that the region which was nearest was the fi rst to bring forth living creatures. And they say that they were taught to honor the gods and to hold sacrifi ces and processions and festivals and other rites by which man honors the deity: and that in consequences their piety was published abroad among all men... they state by reason of their piety towards the deity they manifestly enjoy the favor of the gods, inasmuch as they have never experienced rule of an invader from; for from all time they have enjoyed a state of freedom abroad and peace with the other and though many powerful rulers have made war upon them, not one of them succeeded in this undertaking.” Th e fi rst Ethiopians who were mentioned in the bible were from the land of Kush (Cush), which according to the biblical tradition was a territory on the Upper Nile, south of Egypt; it was also later known as Nubia. Kush is the name of the eldest son of Noah and the territory inhabited by his descendants. Th e Kushites are the descendants of Noah who produced the sons: Shem, Ham, and Japhet, each with their own language, clan, and nation. According to Gen. 9:18, the three sons peopled the rest of the earth, which was indicative of the unity of humanity in the ancient mind. Ham’s son, Cush, went to Ethiopia; his son, Mizraim, went to Egypt; Canaan went to Canaan; Phut (Pwnt) went to Punt, which in Egyptian records, the fabulous land on the East coast of Africa, source of myrrh (which included present-day Somaliland, perhaps also Arabia. e Nag Hammadi Library is a collection of religious texts written by early Christians, known as Gnostics, who were excluded from the church as heretics. It is an invaluable source of Coptic lore, buried since 400AD in Nag Hammadi near Luxor in Egypt and discovered in 1945. Th e NUBIAN PHARAOHS AND MEROITIC KINGS 17 Apocalypse of Adam (v.5), one of the Nag Hammadi tracts cast a new light in the treatment of the fl ood biblical genealogy. “And God will say to Noah- whom all generations will call DeucalonBehold I have protected you in the ark. Th erefore I will give the earth to you and your son.” “Th en Noah will divide the whole earth among his sons Ham and Japhet and Shem. He will then say to them, “My sons listen to my words. I have divided the earth among you. But serve Him with all the days of your life. Let not your seed depart from the face of the Almighty.” “Th en others from the seed of Ham and Japhet will come Four thousand men, and enter another land and sojourn with those who come from the eternal knowledge. Th en the seed of Ham and Japhet will form twelve kingdoms of another people.”3 Th e strength of the Ethiopians or Kushites was detested to such a great degree, the prophet Isaiah, an agent of Yahweh (God), issued a proclamation to all: Disaster! Land of the whirring locust beyond the rivers of Cush, who send ambassadors by sea, in little reed- boats across the waters! NECIA DESIREE HARKLESS 18 to a nation tall and bronzed, a mighty and masterful nation.33 We are told in the Old Testament when the Queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon concerning the name of the lord; she came to him with questions. Kings 10:11 Th e queen, who was a virgin and pure, learning about the history of the world, heard of Solomon’s wisdom and was curious to see what she had heard about, set on a long journey from Axum to Jerusalem, in those days when land and sea were not controlled by easy transportation. She proved his wisdom both material and spiritual. 4. And God gave her what she desired... and this gift was a conception of Menelik I, the son of Solomon who is from the tribe of Judah, the descendant of Abraham, and this Menelik was to rule after her, hence the motto “Th e conquering Lion of the Tribes of Judah” which motto is the basis of the country’s faith and key to their ancestry. I Kings 10:1-13 5. We are told in the New Testament that our Lord ...has praised her journey she made to hear the Wisdom of Solomon. Luke 11: 13. The Temple of Wadi es-Sebua “Es Sebua (“Th e Lions”) was the third temple built by Rameses II ninety- three moles from Aswan. Part of the temple is cut from rock. Rameses II dedicated the temple to Re- Harakhte and to Amun as he considered he was a god, by this time. He also worshiped in the temple. Th e entrance to the temple was formed by an avenue of Sphinxes (from which es-Sebua derives its name) that led up to the south pylon before which stood two colossal statues of Rameses II. At the far end of the sanctuary and above the solar bark on which the beetle-headed Re-Harakhte, the solar god is seated under a canopy while he is seated under a canopy while he is being adored on the left by the king and on the right by three baboons. Below is a niche that still shows traces of the three chiseled statues of the temples. Th ree principal gods are painted over the picture of St. Peter.92 Queen Hatshepsut (1479-1457) also campaigned in Nubia. Th utmose III, her youthful coregent and stepson supplanted her. Th e Queen ruled as a king with ceremonial beard and a fi rm hand for twenty years. Th e temple built at Deir el Bahri was the outstanding monument of her reign. Th e walls display her important trading expedition to Punt. However, it was Th utmose III who extended the Egyptian frontier to the foot of the Holy Mountain at Gebel Barkal at the Fourth Cataract in his 47th regal year. His victory stele at Napata marked his triumph and the extent of the Egyptian frontier and in his temple of Amun-Re, he could boast of his satisfaction in both Egypt and Asia. Amenhotep IV (Akhnaten) (1352-1336) was a coregent with his father, Amenhotep the III, during his later reign. Amenhotep changed his name during his reign to Akhnaten, signifying his new devotion to the Sun god Aten, which was in confl ict with the Th eban god Amun, and the priesthood. Th e center of government remained at Th ebes while Akhnaten moved to Amarna with his beautiful wife Nefertari, and the adherents to the new religion that was a forerunner of Monotheism. Akhnaten built a temple at Karnak in honor of Aten. Th e gains made abroad were gradually diminished by lack of attention on the home front. Th e agreement of the factions of Aten and Amun seem to have begun under Semenekhara (1335-1332), who was coregent with Akhnaten for a short period. He was succeeded by Tutankhamon (1332-23) who was successful in returning the splintered worship of Amun to Th ebes. Th e death of Tutankhamon while still a youth made a place for an elderly noble named Ay (1323-1319) who legitimized his claim by marrying the widow of the deceased Alara’s prayer preserved in the Kawa VI relief refl ects his piety and his belief in the providence of the God Amun: O benefi cent god, swift, who calls upon him, look Upon my sister for me, a women born with me in one womb. Act for her (even) as you have acted for him [Alara] that acted For you , as a wonder, unpremeditated, and not disregarded by refl ective people. For you put a stop to him that plotted evil against me after you set me up as king A stela from Kawa, now located in the Ny Carlsberg Glypotek in Copenhagen, shows Alara making off erings to the god. Th e temple B at Kawa depicts the earliest post new Kingdom temple and affi rms that Alara was the fi rst signifi cant restorer of the Nubian Amun cult. Th e fi rst surviving sculptures of the dynasty are a series of ram sphinxes of heavy cut stone placed by Kashta by its pylon when he enlarged the mud-brick temple of Alara (B800) at Jebel Barkal. Kashta’s legitimacy as king was established through the installation of Alara’s sister as princess of Amun, which created the justifi cation for royal succession and facilitated the shared concepts of traditional Kushite practice with Egyptian concepts of kingship. Kashta was married to his sister Pebtatma indicated by her Abydos stela. Her roles are also given as Sistrum-player of Amen Re, King of the Gods, King’s sister, king’s daughter, mother of the Divine Adoratrice (Amenerdis I). Kashta was affi rmed king by the priests of Amun when he arrived in Th ebes. Adams posits that there was no suggestion of military activity connected with this visit. Pianhki (Piye) : conqueror and deliverer It was Pianhki, the son of Kashta, who completed the submission of Egypt. Th e Sandstone Stela of Piye (747 B.C.) records that Pianhki was appointed by Amun as lord of the Th rones of the Two Lands. Pianhki’s mother was Pebatma; sister was “Sistrum-player of Amun Re, King of the Gods and Mother of the Divine Adoratrice (Amenerdis I). Pianhki married Tabiry, sister of Kashta. Pianhki’s daughter was Shepenwepet II whom he installed when he became king, as God’ Wife of Amun Elect. His other daughters were Tabekenamun, Naparaye and Arty. His brother, Prince Pakartror, was buried at Abydos with the Kushite Royal wives of Kashta and Pianhki. Pianhki also had three sons: Khaluit, Taharqa and Piye-Har. Pianhki’s genius as titular King of Egypt, liturgical wizard in the synthesis of Egyptian and Kushite concepts of order as priest, and military might as general is captured in his Great Triumphal Stela from the Gebel Barkal Temple of Amun in the year 727 B.C. which is now in Cairo. Pianhki (Piye) : conqueror and deliverer It was Pianhki, the son of Kashta, who completed the submission of Egypt. Th e Sandstone Stela of Piye (747 B.C.) records that Pianhki was appointed by Amun as lord of the Th rones of the Two Lands. Pianhki’s mother was Pebatma; sister was “Sistrum-player of Amun Re, King of the Gods and Mother of the Divine Adoratrice (Amenerdis I). Pianhki married Tabiry, sister of Kashta. Pianhki’s daughter was Shepenwepet II whom he installed when he became king, as God’ Wife of Amun Elect. His other daughters were Tabekenamun, Naparaye and Arty. His brother, Prince Pakartror, was buried at Abydos with the Kushite Royal wives of Kashta and Pianhki. Pianhki also had three sons: Khaluit, Taharqa and Piye-Har. It has been noted in recent studies of horse skeletons from el Kurru by Bokonyi (1993) and the textual evidence of use of horses in Kushite warfare indicates that the fi nest horses used in contemporary Egypt and Assyria were bred and exported from Nubia. Th is splendid large stela of pink granite with a rounded top has a lunette relief which gives a pictorial summary of the event in the text that describes his wars fought under the protection of Amun bringing him the victory he envisioned. At the left of the lunette is Amun sitting on the throne with Mut the goddess standing behind Amun and Pianhki standing before him. King Namlot, of Hermopolis, is leading a horse in front of Pianhki shaking a sistrum in order to pacify him. Pianhki in the tradition of the pharaohs donated his tribute of war to the god NECIA DESIREE HARKLESS 130 Amun which was vast: “a mass of copper or turquoise as large as yourself, fi nest horses, gold, silver, lapislazuli, property of all kinds, suits of apparel made of byssus of every quality, and couches and coverlets of linen, and anti perfume, vases of unguent, metal vessels or gold ornaments for the neck, crowns for your head, gold vases for ceremonies of purifi cation, precious inlaid stones...” At Kawa, Pianhki added a colonnaded forecourt where his stelae could be erected and pylons to the temple of Amun and built a paved processional road. On the walls of the temple, the ancient thirty-year Sed festival is depicted showing the king restoring his powers. At Kurru, he is entombed in a pyramid with subterranean chamber accessed by a stairway, and his wife Tabiry is buried nearby. Th e horses that he loved were buried as well at Kurru with elaborate trappings of silver and gold. Th e reign of the conqueror lasted 30 years. Pianhki is also remembered from the Sandstone Stela by his speech: ‘Th e Son of Re, lord of Diadems, “beloved of Amun, Pi(anh)ki says: Amun of Napata has granted me to be ruler of every foreign country. He to whom I say, you are chief, he is to be chief. He to whom I say ‘You are not king !’ he is not King . Amun in Dominion (Th ebes) has granted me to be ruler of Black-land. ...Gods make a king, men make a king, But it is Amun who has made me Th e earliest throne name of Pianhki, as Lord of Two Lands was indicative of his godship and kingship. Shabataka assumed the reign of the Kingdom of Kush and Egypt, following the death of his father. His attested wife was Arty, a daughter of Pianhki. Shabataka was enthroned at Th ebes in the great temple of Amun. His titulary included “Whose appearances -endure, Beloved of Ptah and Beloved of Amun. Th is ‘shadowy king’ falls through the cracks of history as so little has been found to affi rm his reign. Th e Karnak Nile level record, year three of Shabataka, records that he arrived at Th ebes, the compound of Amun on the fi fth day of the fi rst month of summer in his third regal year. ============================ Hedjkheperre Setepenre Shoshenq I (reigned c. 943–922 BC)—also known as Sheshonk or Sheshonq I is presumed to be the Shishak (Shishak, Shishaq or Susac) mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. Sheshonq I was the son of Nimlot A, Great Chief of the Ma, and his wife Tentshepeh A, a daughter of a Great Chief of the Ma herself. The Meshwesh (often abbreviated in ancient Egyptian as Ma) were an ancient Libyan tribe of Berber origin from beyond Cyrenaica. According to Egyptian hieroglyphs, this area is where the Libu and Tehenu inhabited. Melachim I - I Kings - Chapter 3 All humans have been given the knowledge of good and evil. Our Creator bestowed Solomon the gift discerning whether the actions of others are good or evil. In return, the Creator had only the request that Solomon keep His statutes and My commandments. Melachim I - I Kings - Chapter 5 Melachim I - I Kings - Chapter 9 Ecclesiastes is presented as an autobiography of "Kohelet" (or "Qoheleth", meaning "Gatherer", but traditionally translated as "Teacher" or "Preacher"). Kohelet's story is framed by voice of the narrator, who refers to Kohelet in the third person, praises Solomon's wisdom, but reminds the reader that wisdom has its limitations and is not man's main concern. One reason the Kohelet is identified as Solomon is that at one time Solomon was the king of Israel, and Ecclesiastes 1:1 identifies the Preacher as “king in Jerusalem.” Also in agreement with Ecclesiastes 1:1, Solomon was a “son of David.” Kohelet - Ecclesiastes - Chapter 1 Abraham Lincoln quoted Ecclesiastes 1:4 in his address to the reconvening Congress on December 1, 1862, during the darkest hours of the American Civil War President Abraham Lincoln Second Annual Message December 1, 1862 Egyptian influence on Israel was particularly strong in the reign of Solomon who became the son-in-law to an Egyptian Pharaoh. It has been suggested that Neterkheperre or Netjerkheperre-setepenamun Siamun was the unnamed pharaoh of the Bible who gave in marriage his daughter to king Solomon in order to seal an alliance between Israel and Egypt. Neterkheperre was the sixth pharaoh of Egypt during the Twenty-first dynasty. He built extensively in Lower Egypt for a king of the Third Intermediate Period and is regarded as one of the most powerful rulers of the 21st Dynasty after Psusennes I. Netjerkheperre-Setepenamun, means "Divine is The Manifestation of Ra, Chosen of Amun" while his name means 'son of Amun (also Amon, Ammon, Amen).' Melachim I - I Kings - Chapter 9 King Solomon incorporated the teachings of Israel Egypt's Vizier Ptahhotep on how to keep good moral sense when making decisions. Ecclesiastes 10 Scripture presents Solomon had access to Egyptian and Babylonian literature. King Solomon's actions caused Israel to fall from the Creator's grace. Melachim I - I Kings - Chapter 11 Kohelet - Ecclesiastes - Chapter 12 While Solomon did pay for his transgressions here on earth, his last word of wisdom does offer hope for his possible Salvation. Shishak, Shishaq or Susac (Hebrew: שישק, Tiberian: [ʃiʃaq], Ancient Greek: Σουσακίμ, translit. Sousakim) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, an Egyptian pharaoh who sacked Jerusalem in the 10th century BCE. He is usually identified with the pharaoh Shoshenq I. Sheshonq I campaign against the Kingdom of Judah and his sack of Jerusalem is contained in the Hebrew Bible (1 Kings 14:25 and 2 Chronicles 12:1-12). According to these books of the Hebrew Bible, Shishak had provided refuge to Jeroboam during the later years of Solomon's reign, and upon Solomon's death, Jeroboam became king of the tribes in the north, which became the Kingdom of Israel. In the fifth year of Rehoboam's reign (commonly dated ca. 926 BCE[2]), Shishak swept through the Kingdom of Judah with a powerful army of 60,000 horsemen and 1,200 chariots, in support of his ally Jeroboam, the king of Israel. According to 2 Chronicles 12:3, he was supported by the Lubim (Libyans), the Sukkiim, and the Kushites ("Ethiopians" in the Septuagint). Shishak took away treasures of the Temple of Yahweh and the king's house, as well as shields of gold which Solomon had made;[3] Rehoboam replaced them with brass ones. According to Second Chronicles, Egyptian military conquests against Assyria and Israel, aided by Ethiopians are recorded in the Books of Kings, Acts, and the Chronicles. Mention is made of an Ethiopian army assisting Shishak ( Sheshonk) who ruled Egypt during the reign of Rehoboam, the King of Judah and the Son of Solomon. Shishak’s army swept across the land of Judah, with twelve hundred chariots and sixty thousand men, leaving in his wake fi re and destruction. Th e people of Lubim and Sukkim, and the Ethiopians are further described as a host with many horses and chariots. Subduing the Judeans in the south, Shishak continued north to Jerusalem, taking away the treasures of the king which included all of the gold shields which Solomon had made.31 Melachim I - I Kings - Chapter 14 Divrei Hayamim II - II Chronicles - Chapter 12
  9. Luke_Wilbur

    The Didache (The Teaching) 2nd Revision

    600 years before Socrates, Aristotle and Demosthenes, the Israelite King Solomon wrote and shared words of wisdom to his people that a perfect weight on honest scales and balances are the Creator's will. Mishlei - Proverbs - Chapter 11 Proverbs 16 The Egyptian scale and balance concept of 'Ma’at' predated the Torah by 2000 years, but had a similar meaning of an active Creative Force of Nature involved in the scales and balances of Justice. Ma’at originated as a concept and evolved into belief in a goddess that was a manifestation of the Creator and Sun god, Amun Ra (Amun Re, Yamānu, Hidden One) to maintain truth, justice and natural universal order by balancing the flow of Ka (vital energy, life force, magic) from opposing powers. Ma’at is also a blatant counter force to the Egyptian term isfet (disorder). As a goddess, through the activation of the Ka (Heka) Ma’at was created by Amun Ra and opponent of Apepi (Aapep) the giant serpent and Lord of Chaos. Egyptians had no concept of Hell after death, Judgement came to those that followed Apepi and heart was not pure during life, their punishment was to devoured by the female demon Ammit into non-existence. In the Egyptian Book of the Dead, Maat represents the ethical and moral principle of truth and honor that every citizen was expected to follow throughout their daily lives. The soul, ka (vital energy, and Chu (Shu, breath of life) originated on earth and were connected to immortality. Book of the Dead of Hunefer Chapter CLXXXIII Papyrus of Un'neferu
  10. Luke_Wilbur

    The Didache (The Teaching) 2nd Revision

    Marcus Cicero believed in a Actively Involved Creator (Divine Providence) over a Do Nothing Creator (Prime Mover) defined by the Greek Philosopher Epicurus that walked this earth 200 years before him. Epicurus taught that pain and death are not evil unto themselves. Cicero believed in the immortality of the soul, and the tranquility of the good after death, and the punishment of the wicked defined by Plato. Epicurus also believed in divine beings, but man cannot be divine and should not expect anything good or bad to come from the gods. Epicurus taught that if one understands that he or she is not immortal, then one can be free of the fear of death and the pain caused from its coming. Epicurus Letter to Menoeceus Marcus Cicero agreed with Epicurus that death and pain are not evil unto themselves. But, he maintained that it was reason that links us to the Creator. It is this Provident Creator that generated man to transcend over the other creatures by reason and thought. And it is the right (successful) reason between the Creator and Man we find self evident, which we call Law. Epicurus believed that circumstance was the Prime Mover and Natural Order of matter. While Cicero maintained that through right reasoning we can take notice of the natural link between our indestructible spirit and our Creator through natural and morally just laws that derive from loving our associates. Epicurus taught that some outcomes happen out of necessity, others by chance, and our own through our own agency (course of action). Epicurus considered Law to be Truth as long as through Prudent Reasoning it is considered to be useful (Natural Justice and Honorable) and successful (pleasurable) to all parties (self evident). The chain of Epicurian reasoning has led us to now consider the infinite outcome reality of quantum self interest over one outcome reality of an outside Creative force of nature watching and interacting with us. It is in only the successful outcome of our decisions that those that believe in either a Provident Creator, a Prime Mover, or No God can agree. 50 years before Epicurus, a sage by the name of Aristotle tutor of Alexander the Great, argued that is through contrary outcomes that we can find Natural Justice. Nicomachean Ethics By Aristotle Another great orator that both born and died the same years as Aristotle (384 - 322 BC) by the name of Demosthenes led a failed revolt against Alexander the Great and took his life rather than being arrested. Demosthenes believed that unjust actions to be wicked and just actions to be good and honest. Demosthenes Against Aristocrates Section 75 Demosthenes argued that those who fail to see and act upon god given opportunities during their lifetime will be judged their denial of the divine good in them. Demosthenes Olynthiac 1 Section 11 Demosthenes and Aristotle would have known Socrates, the Great Greek philosopher that proceeded them. In Joeseph Priestly's work, Socrates and Jesus Compared, Socrates devout religious belief to help citizens and others to be good was greatly admired. He taught the one Law of Nature is to do good in return for good received; or face the penalty of being deserted by your friends in you time of need. Priestly also writes that taught of a decisive power superior to man. And Unlike Epicurus belief that the gods were unconcerned spectators of the plight of man, Socrates reasoned the gods were concerned and interceded in the affairs of man. At his trial Socrates said that he had often heard a Daemon (divine voice) who was frequently present within him. He trusted the judgement of his personal reason and the wisdom of the gods over people. During his trial,Socrates listened to his Daemon repeated commands not to make any defense to the accusations, which led to his demise against tyrants. During Socrates sentencing he pleaded a justifiable reason of vanity that he if was executed, Athens would find no other man like him. Ultimately Socrates execution made him even more famous as a martyr for morality. To Priestly it appears that Socrates had little or no faith in the sanction of virtue in the doctrine of a future state. But, believed in the pleasure received during life and the chance of honored by the living after death. Priestly writes, "Socrates, according to Plato, generally speaks of a future state, and the condition of men in, as the popular belief, which might be true or false. Priestly does mention that Socrates taught that there was a privilege given by the gods to only a select group humans initiated in the right manner into a philosophy of meditation of a pure mind over their body to live with them. Socrates did not know whether or not he had succeeded in this endeavor or not. SOCRATES AND JESUS COMPARED BY JOSEPH PRIESTLY page 22 Priestly maintained Socrates theorized that the substance of man's power of thinking, or mental action may remain when the corporeal body ceases to exist. Priestly then added the Greek general belief of an afterlife during the time of Socrates could have been similar to the Jews idea of afterlife, but the record of this Future State revelation had been long lost.
  11. The Didache - Introduction "Son, if you look for the good you will find it. If you look for the bad you will find it too." This was the first moral teaching given to me by my father when I was just a boy. Learning the truth of good and bad starts with life experiences with family (mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, grandparents, aunts, uncles, guardians etc..) friends, classmates, teachers (pastors, priests, rabbis, professors, councilors, etc), and adversaries. Truth can be further shaped with the knowledge gained from media (internet, television, radio, movies, books, etc ). In this age of Science and Faith it can be difficult is discerning the Truth that comes from a Creative Force of Nature and what is from the teaching of man. I have chosen to research the Didache of the 12 Apostles because it is honored as the 'first catechism' (articles of faith) of the Christian church. The Didache (dee-da-ke, Greek word for teaching) of the 12 Apostles is a timeless moral compass that identifies selfless positive actions that lead to life and prosperity and negative selfish actions that lead to death and destruction. For nonChristians the Didache is a code of conduct without references to angels, prophecy and miracles.The principles of right living by the golden rule apply to everyone regardless of culture or creed. in life. For those in Behavior Sciences and religious naturalist the Didache is a good window to understanding the evolution of Jewish, Christian, and Islamic social morality. Congruent (in harmony) to the Laws give to the Israelites through Moses, the Didache is an instruction manual Jesus gave to the Apostles that further defines how to be righteous (law abiding) Christians. Over time the original Didache was replaced with revised teachings that brought about new catechisms, church schisms, reformations, and the birth of Arianism, Islam, Protestantism, Mormonism and Unitarianism. In humble admiration, I am using President Thomas Jefferson's syllabus method used in his book "The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth" (also known as the Jefferson Bible) to best present the truth in the Didache of the 12 Apostles. Jefferson's book was made made by cutting out gospel wisdom passages of the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) and arranging them on the pages of a blank book, in a certain order of time or subject that he thought best to present the philosophical teachings of Jesus without the supernatural. President John Adams understood the magnitude of Jefferson's work. John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 14 November 1813 I will follow the same method by adapting the modern technology of copying, cutting, and pasting a reasoned comparison of the Didache's text line by line with my life experiences, media and the Holy Word (Scripture) given by a supernatural Creative Force of Nature that has been witnessed and testified by the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faiths. In addition, I will include other faiths, philosophy, and natural science in context to a particular Apostolic teaching. I propose the Didache to be a great mechanism to create positive neuroplasticity (physical change to the brain) and socioplasticity (cultural change to a society) that should be studied for its benefits to the happiness of our human condition. I ask you the reader to temporarily suspend your preconception or disbelief on whether or not a Creative Force of Nature exists or how an Apostolic teaching can give us an understanding on how the choice of our actions can lead to Life and Happiness or Death and Misery until I am finished presenting testimony of definitions of to you. It is my hope that together you the reader and I the writer strip away the bias of belief and unbelief in our quest for truth to better understanding what it means to have good moral sense in life and share the happiness when we find it. In our pursuit for the truth of happiness I shall begin my essay with a quote from the United States Declaration of Independence. As the primary author of the United States Declaration of Independence , Thomas Jefferson understood the liberty of choice our Creator has given us to pursuit the wisdom of life and prosperity or suffer the evils of death and destruction. The truth of choice that the followers of religion and/or nature, universally agree upon is defined as 'self evident.' Jefferson acquired John Locke's notion how Nature has transcribed into man the understanding of happiness and misery. In the 1689 book, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke writes. Chapter III No Innate Practical Principles An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, ( Chapters 2 -3) John Locke writes that the knowledge of the truths of Nature, Happiness and Misery comes through our senses from acquired experiences that are placed into memory. In infancy sensory development begins with our innate ability to differentiate pain from pleasure, hot from cold, bitter from sweet, stench from perfume, light from dark, loud from quiet, and rough from smooth. Locke notes that as our development continues, our minds begin to acquire general abstract ideas from familiar objects and prior experienced events. Some of the abstract ideas our minds formulate are right (successful) and some are wrong (failure). Our ability to recognize right and wrong ideas is what John Locke calls "the use of reason." Acquired ideas that become more accepted by reason are given names and basic language is formed. Ideas that are shared, understood and accepted by others become undoubted truths are what John Locke defines as "maxims." Many undoubted truths not known to others are reasoned by reflecting on their own unique development experiences. Undoubted truths that are reasoned and accepted before they are known are what John Locke terms "implicit maxims.' Ideas that are shared and not understood to be accepted as true or false, assent or dissent, are considered ignorant. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding John Locke To understand how Thomas Jefferson acquired maxim of the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God we must first review Commentaries on the Laws of England by English judge, Sir William Blackstone published in 1765. The Will of the Creative force of Nature is called Natural Law. It is the explicit Will of Natural Law that binds us to this Universe and each other. It is the implicit Will of Natural Law to protect those who choose to accept and follow what we find to be good and self evident with our life. Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England Introduction Of the Nature of Laws in General. In Jefferson's 1817 letter to John Tyler, our nation's third president acknowledged the use of Blackstone's common laws and the Will of the Creator in forming the the Republic of the United States. But, America's use of English common law was fashioned into a system that was more relevant to a government without a king. It was the Republic's cause of ascension of the rights of citizens over being ruled by a king that made the Declaration of Independence a necessary document. Locke, Blackstone and Jefferson believed that a Creative Force of Nature has given us power over our body and mind to pursue or avoid sensations and reflections of pleasure and pain. John Locke believed that the Creator willed us to follow moral laws of virtue and happiness that preserve our individual selves and society from pain. Locke wrote that mankind will be rewarded if we abide by the given laws and punished if we disobey them. Locke, Blackstone, and Jefferson knew that 50 years before Jesus Christ walked the earth, Cicero, the Roman Philosopher theorized how the moral sense of law bestowed by the Creator enables man to discern by reason what is virtue (good) and what is vice (evil). Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, 5 July 1814 In The Political Works of Marcus Tullius Cicero, vol. 2 (Treatise on the Laws). Cicero defined the Law of Nature as the governing power of the Creator as both an equitable distribution of goods and discrimination of good and evil.
  12. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    From a study of the Holy Quran and Traditions of the Holy Prophet, it transpires that there are three objectives of Zakat (poor-due). One is basic and specific and the other two are secondary and collective. The basic and essential objective of Zakat is purification of the soul. It cures the lust for wealth, infuses the feat Allah in mans heart and makes one amenable to good deeds. The Holy Quran says: And away from it (Hell) shall be kept the most pious one, who gives away his wealth in order to purify himself. (XCIL:17-18) On another occasion Allah addresses and exhorts the Holy Prophet (Pbuh) in these words: Take alms of their wealth, wherewith you may cleanse and purify them. (9: 103) These verses make the real importance of Zakat quite clear: it aims to emancipate the heart from temporal preoccupations and purifies the soul. It is an acknowledged fact that the love of material things is the real enemy of prayer. It turns a man away from Allah and the After-life. The Holy Prophet once said: The root of all evil is the love of worldly things. (Mishkat) Although temporal love includes many things the most powerful and dangerous of all is the love of material wealth. The Holy Prophet has, therefore, regarded it as the greatest of all evils for the Muslims: The trial for my Ummah is wealth. (Tirmidhi) If a Muslim can save himself from the lure of wealth, he will be able to protect himself from many other vices. Because of its basic aim and purpose, poor-due is known as zakat in Islam. Literally it means both purification and growth. To give a portion of ones income to the needy for the pleasure of Allah is called Zakat because it purifies the soul. It must, however, be remembered that the aim of zakat is achieved only when its payment is motivated by sincere desire and practical effort. The pleasure of Allah should be the first and foremost consideration while paying Zakat. It must be free from every other motive. Zakat should be paid out of the income earned only by fair and honest means. Whatever is paid should be respectable. If cheap and worthless stuff is given in zakat it will go in vain. It will be no better than a hypocritical gesture. Zakats beneficiary should neither be made to feel grateful for it, nor should his feelings and self-respect be hurt. Otherwise, Zakat will cease to have any meaning. One secondary objective of the poor-due is to provide basic necessities to poor Muslims. The Holy Prophet said: Verily Allah has ordained the payment of Zakat on them (Muslims). It will be taken from the rich and returned to the poor. (Muslim) These Traditions make it quite obvious that there is also a social and economic aspect of the poor-due without which its Islamic concept remains incomplete. The other secondary objective of Zakat is the help and support of Islam. While giving the details of the beneficiaries of Zakat the Holy Quran says: The alms are only for the poor and the needy, and for those who collect them, and those whose hearts are to be reconciled, and to free the captives and the debtors and for the cause of Allah, and for the wayfarers. (9:60) The words the cause of Allah denote the struggle waged for Islam, zakat in islam https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PF0v1gz8IZo Dr. Zakir Naik Q&A Wealth, Zakat and its testing in Islam Islamic Research Foundation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRuEhOJyZpo
  13. eninn

    Eid Mubarak.....^_^

    Happy days Eid Mubarak.....^_^ \\ here my friends non muslims said Thank you for the interesting and engaging information, tiger . Happy Eid day. I hope you guys spend your eid day with your family and friends. I have also enjoyed my eid day with my family and friends. EID MUBARAK.. Happy days I hope you enjoy yourself. tiger dan semua Muslims. \ I wish you and your family joy of the celebration. \ Notwithstanding Eid Mubarak greeting is the norm in this region, Eid Mubarak to all Muslim brethren. \ After a long month of fasting, time for big meal. Saw many Malays selling Kueh to park yesterday mostly from Malaysia. \ Take the wife out for a romantic dinner. Nice \ May I take this opportunity to wish all our Muslim friends Selamat Hari Raya .... Happy days محاضرة السيد: عبدالرحيم جرين بمعرض رسولنا محمد بإزدان م ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy8cpdkS1ZQ
  14. eninn

    Month of Return to.....?????

    Muslims all over the world love the month of Ramadan and look forward to it with mounting excitement. In the weeks preceding Ramadan lives are scrutinised, and plans are made for a month of serious worship and supplication. The countdown begins and conversations start with how many weeks it is until the blessed month arrives. Perhaps non-Muslims wonder why we look forward to fasting days and sleepless nights. Ramadan offers the chance of redemption and great rewards. It is a month like no other. A month of spiritual reflection and prayer. Hearts are directed away from worldly activities and towards God. In the month Ramadan, all physically mature and healthy Muslims are required to fast: to abstain from all food, drink, gum chewing, any kind of tobacco use and any kind of sexual contact between dawn and sunset. Nevertheless, this is only the physical aspect there are also the spiritual characteristics, which include refraining from gossiping, lying, slandering and all traits of bad character. All obscene and impious sights and sounds are avoided as a way of purifying thoughts and actions. Fasting is also a way of experiencing hunger and developing sympathy for the less fortunate and learning thankfulness and appreciation for all of God's bounties. God said,“O you who believe! Observing the fast is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may become pious.” (Quran 2:183) The Prophet Muhammad also reminded us that fasting is not just abstaining from food and drink but there is a further dimension. He said, “He who does not desist from obscene language and acting obscenely (during the period of fasting), God has no need that he didn’t eat or drink.” Ramadan is also the month when Muslims try to establish or re establish a relationship with the Quran. Although this may sound like a strange thing to say, the words of God are a guiding light and a mercy. Nobody reads Quran except that it changes his or her life in some way. The Quran was sent down in this month of Ramadan. The two, Ramadan and Quran are inextricably entwined. Being with the Quran, reading, memorising, reciting it or pondering its meanings is spiritually uplifting comforting and a source of strength. Recitation in the night is particularly beneficial, the distractions of the day have faded away and closeness of God is palpable in the stillness of the night. Special evening prayers are conducted during which portions of the Qur'an are recited. These prayers are known as Taraweeh. One thirtieth of the Qur'an is read on successive evenings, so that by the end of the month the entire Qur'an has been completed. Ramadan Moon Sighting Issues | Khalid Yasin - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwYLUdIMzgk دعوة غير المسلمين - خالد ياسين - مترجم Dawah to N ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txhtZGkesVI
  15. Dear Parents, Last chance to get discount registration Early bird Discount ends June 1 Don't miss out! ⚽️☀️ Summer Training Registration Now Open! Girls & Boys (Ages 4 to 19) JUNE-JULY-AUGUST OPEN TO NON-CLUB MEMBERS INFORMATION & REGISTRATIONORMATION & REGISTRATION http://www.tocajuniors.com/programs_Summer-Soccer-Training.php
  16. eninn

    Month of Return to.....?????

    ماذا تفعل إذا كنت تحب الإسلام وتنتظر علامة؟ بلال فيلبس ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRYrDe-sKfI Ramadan Muslims - Abdur Raheem Green - YouTube ‪ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TepFnBm9Qs8
  17. eninn

    Month of Return to.....?????

    It was Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him, who made us raise our eyes from the dust beneath to view the glory of the starry heavens above. It was Muhammad who led us from the depths of darkness to the grandeur of the light of God. The Prophet was the one who led us to break our stone statues and wooden gods. It was Muhammad who lifted us out of the filth of idolatry to relish the serenity of God’s transcendence. On the Night of Power in one Ramadan, the Quran descended on Muhammad, and he received its first verses in the Cave of Hira. (Ibn Abbas) Thereafter the Prophet taught us how to celebrate Ramadan through days of fasting and nights of prayer: to honor each day of Ramadan as a day of patient endurance through fasting, and each night as a night of gratitude through prayers. An Unexpected Transformation It was nothing short of miraculous how the Prophet reformed and refined those unruly tribes of Arabia and transformed them into pious, disciplined, God-fearing ascetics, who stood in prayers in the mosque five times a day seeking the guidance of God. And imagine: these same people who once reveled in the pleasures of “wine and women” could now spend the whole month of Ramadan in fasting and prayers. Into the hearts of his followers, the Prophet instilled the love and fear of God and love for humanity. His example was inspiring and irresistible; and each of them became eager to be his closest follower. To them he was the sincerest and the most cordial of leaders. And his life was open before them like a book; they could see him practicing most closely in his own life what he was preaching. Ramadan Made Easy - Dr. Bilal Philips - YouTube ‪ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZLQ--JZe9A
  18. eninn

    Month of Return to.....?????

    someone told me ramadan in non Muslim countries have to put up with it like it's one of our own festivals? the number of people who take it serious is growing as the influence of religion is growing here Gentleness in Hardship allah is All-Merciful and He has expressed His Mercy to us His creatures through the sending of His final messenger Muhammad as an embodiment of mercy. The Prophet said: “Have mercy to those on earth so that He Who is in Heaven will have mercy on you.” (Tirmidhi) “The believer is not the one who eats his fill when the neighbor beside him is hungry.” (Bayhaqi) So it was not surprising that the Prophet’s Companions loved him dearly, as he was the kindest of men, bestowing his mercy not only upon humans but also on other creatures of the world as well. No leader could be more considerate and solicitous of his followers than Muhammad: he never allowed any Muslim to bear any burden more than they could bear, as taught by God Himself. For he was well aware of the infirmities of people; and this is evident from his consideration for his followers in the matter of fasting: He taught Muslims to delay the sahur (the pre-dawn meal before fasting) till a little before Dawn Prayer and not to delay the iftar (the meal to break the fast) after the call to Sunset Prayer so that no unnecessary strain is laid on the fasting person by prolonging the fast time. During travel in Ramadan, the Prophet would either fast or break his fast; and he allowed his companions to choose between the two, according to their ability. Similarly during times of heat or thirst they were permitted to cool themselves by pouring water on the head, and the Prophet himself did so. His example in the matter of consorting with his wives during Ramadan was not different; he disallowed only such acts that would obviously undermine the fasting. As for the Tarawih Prayers (the supererogatory night prayers performed in Ramadan), . Thus while he demonstrated through his example that the Tarawih Prayers are better offered in congregation, he allowed leniency in the matter out of his mercy. Ramadan Reminder - Sh. Abdurraheem Green [HD] - ... ‪ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdbFPw5eQrc The Soul of Ramadan - Dr. Bilal Philips - YouTube ‪ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Py6REoVh020
  19. eninn

    Month of Return to.....?????

    The Prophet demonstrated to his people how this world is less important than the next, and how the body is less important than the soul. In fasting, the Prophet taught them step by step how to ignore the physical demands so that the spirit reigns supreme. Abandoning food, drink, and sex was only a prelude to the next stage of greater significance: of conquering avidity and cupidity, lust and licentiousness; of liberating one’s mind from flights of passion and fits of temper. Indeed the Prophet said: “The strong person is not the one who can wrestle someone else down. The strong person is the one who can control himself when he is angry.” (Saheeh Al-Bukhari) Also about the effect of fasting on one’s behaviour, the Prophet said, “Fasting is a shield, so the one who fasts should avoid obscene speech and ignorant behaviour. If someone abuses him or starts to fight with him, he should reply by saying: ‘I am fasting. I am fasting’.” (Saheeh Al-Bukhari) The core of fasting according to the Prophet was one’s willingness not merely to give up self-indulgence, but to feel the need of one’s brother as one’s own. And no one was more kind-hearted and generous than the Messenger of God; and his generosity reached its peak in Ramadan. (Saheeh Al-Bukhari) The Prophet stressed on the importance of treating people nicely when he said: “Make things easy for people and do not make them difficult, and cheer people up and do not drive them away.” (Saheeh Al-Bukhari) He also said: “The most beloved of actions to God Almighty, is making another Muslim happy, removing a hardship that has befallen him, paying off a debt of his or ridding him of hunger. It is more beloved to me indeed that I walk with my Muslim brother to see to a need of his than secluding oneself in a mosque for a month…” (Tabarani) The heart of one who sincerely fasts is open to the contemplation of the magnificence of the countless bounties of God. That is why the Prophet asked his followers to avoid gluttony: “The food of two people is enough for three, and the food of three people is enough for four.” (Saheeh Al-Bukhari) Bilal Philips - Ramadan is A Secret Between You and Allah ... ‪ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7KTxQjQZqM Ramadan And Social Media ᴴᴰ #RamadanPicks Sheikh ... ‪ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sch7xh778qo
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    Actual reality?????

    الداعية الأمريكي خالد ياسين يتحدى الإعلام - مترجم - Khal ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92jumF7cXyw دعوة غير المسلمين - خالد ياسين - مترجم Dawah to N ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txhtZGkesVI علامات الأيام الأخيرة المُحاضر : عبد الرحيم غرين بالل ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkhPsmxXVzA
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    Actual reality?????

    \\\ qibla change in islam There are more than 1.5 billion Muslims in the world, and each time they pray, they turn their faces in one direction, towards Mecca. The Islamic term for this direction is qibla. When a Muslim prepares to pray, no matter where he is, he turns towards the qibla, the direction of the Kaba. The Kaba is a small cube shaped building in the courtyard of the mosque known as Masjid Al Haram, in the city of Mecca, in the country of Saudi Arabia. “For every nation there is a direction to which they face (in their prayers). So hasten towards all that is good. Wheresoever you may be, God will bring you together (on the Day of Resurrection). Truly, God is Able to do all things. And from wheresoever you start forth (for prayers), turn your face in the direction of Al-Masjid-al-Haram (at Mecca), that is indeed the truth from your Lord. And God is not unaware of what you do.” (Quran 2:148-149) Muslims do not worship the Kaba, or its contents, it is simply a focal point. Muslims worship One God, the Most Merciful, and the Most Wise. God decreed that when Muslims pray they all face one direction. It is a sign of unity that encapsulates the unity embedded in the religion of Islam. The Arabic word for prayer is salah and it demotes a connection between the believer and God; when all believers face the same direction it adds an extra dimension to the connection. The prayer connects the believers to God and the qibla connects the believers to one another. It has been said that if one could observe all the Muslims at prayer we would be able to see lines of worshippers bowing and prostrating like the petals of a flower opening and closing in unison. The qibla was not always oriented towards Mecca. The first Muslims prayed towards the al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. Around sixteen months after Prophet Muhammad and his followers migrated from Mecca to the city of Medina, the qibla was changed to the Kaba. According to accounts by Prophet Muhammad's companions, the change happened very suddenly. During the noon prayer, Prophet Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him, received a revelation from God instructing him to, "Turn your face towards the Masjid al Haram". “Thus, we have made you real believers in Islamic Monotheism, true followers of Prophet Muhammad and his legal ways, a just nation, witnesses over mankind and the Messenger a witness over you. And We made the Qibla (prayer direction towards Jerusalem) which you used to face, only to test those who followed the Messenger from those who would turn on their heels (i.e. disobey the Messenger). Indeed, it was great (heavy) except for those whom God guided. And God would never make your prayers to be lost (i.e. your prayers offered towards Jerusalem). Truly, God is full of kindness, the Most Merciful towards humankind.” “Verily! We have seen the turning of your (Muhammad) face towards the heaven. Surely, We shall turn you to a Qibla (prayer direction) that shall please you, so turn your face in the direction of Al-Masjid- al-Haram (at Mecca). And wheresoever you people are, turn your faces (in prayer) in that direction...” (Quran 2:143-144) Changing the direction of prayer establishes Mecca as the fixed central point for worship. It establishes a common sense or purpose. Throughout the centuries, mathematicians and astronomers have established correct ways to determine the qibla (direction) from any point on the earth’s surface. There are two precise moments each year when the sun is directly above the Kaba, thus the direction of shadows in any sunlit place will point away from the qibla. There are also two moments per year when the sun is directly over the exact opposite position of the Kaba, thus pointing towards the qibla. It is important the Muslims make every effort to face the right direction when praying; however, slight deviations do not invalidate a person’s prayer. Prophet Muhammad said, “What is between the east and the west is qibla”.[1] Nowadays it is easy to locate the qibla. It is a simple matter to look at a map and draw a line between your location and the city of Mecca. Compasses and computer programs that locate the qibla are readily available and most mosques throughout the world have a niche in the wall to indicate the qibla. Islam is a religion of unity. Muslims are united by their belief in One God. They are one brotherhood united in the language and ritual of prayer and united by the direction of their worship. The qibla is not only about degrees of latitude or longitude it is about unity. It is about humankind united in the worship of the One God, Creator, and Sustainer of the universe. Change Of Qibla From Jerusalem To Kaaba By Nouman Ali https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfeSLuLMeAo Concept of Aqeeda e Risalat in the light of Incident of Change of Qibla by Tahir ul Qadri Khan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v67R8quJvP8
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    Actual reality?????

    Al-Isra and Al-Miraj Scenes from Paradise And fire() هذه الرحلة بواسطة الروح والجسد معا 1 This trip by soul and body together 3 from Mecca to Al-Aqsa=alisraa That journey was it from earth to heaven=almiraj Proof of the sincerity of the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him Certificate in the Quraish infidels Shut up the mouths of all the skeptics \\\ In the name of Allah the Most Gracious the Most Merciful, Peace, Mercy and Blessings be upon you. The Al-Aqsa Mosque has existed since ancient times before there was a thing called the Children of Israel. The mosque is the entire arena. It was known as the Holy House and the Holy Qur'an is the first to call it the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Israel, like David and Solomon, used to pray in it, and again the mosque is meant to be the whole arena, not the building that is now called the Al-Aqsa Mosque. The dome was built by the Umayyads on a rock Musa Cerantonio speaking in SLRC Annual Meet Part 1 - ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybPUvgwBu6E Musa Cerantonio speaking in SLRC Annual Meet Part 2 - ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iyzd8yRlVc
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    Actual reality?????

    1- On Prophet Muhammad's journey from Masjid al-Haram to Masjid al-Aqsa, Allah enabled him to see some of His wondrous creations. Allah enabled the Prophet to see the world (dunya) like an old woman. However, this old woman was wearing a great deal of jewelry, and in this there is an indication signifying the reality of the world. 2- Allah enabled the Prophet to see Iblis. The Prophet saw something on the side of the road which did not dare to stand in his way or speak to him. What the Prophet saw was Iblis. Originally, Iblis was a believer and lived with the angels in Paradise. When Allah ordered the angels to prostrate (sujud) to Prophet Adam, Iblis was ordered to prostrate to him as well. The angels prostrated to Adam in obedience to Allah, because angels do not disobey Allah. However, Iblis did not obey, and he objected to the order of Allah. He said, "You created me out of fire, and You created him out of clay. How do You order me to prostrate to him?" So this objection by Iblis to the order of Allah was the first blasphemy he committed. 3- On his journey, the Prophet smelled a very nice odor. He asked Jibril about this pleasant scent and Jibril informed him this good smell was coming from the grave of the woman whose duty used to be to comb Pharaoh's daughter's hair. This woman was a good, pious believer. One day, as she was combing Pharaoh's daughter's hair, the comb fell from her hand. At this she said, ""Bismillah. "Pharaoh's daughter asked her, "Do you have a god other than my father?" The woman said, "Yes. My Lord and the Lord of your father is Allah." Pharaoh's daughter told her father what had happened. Pharaoh demanded this woman blaspheme and leave Islam, but she refused. At that, Pharaoh threatened to kill her children. He brought a great pot of water and built a great fire under it. When the water boiled, Pharaoh brought her children and started to drop them into that pot one after the other. Throughout all this, the woman remained steadfast to Islam, even when Pharaoh reached her youngest child--a little boy still breast feeding--but she felt pity for him. At that, Allah enabled this child to speak. He said to his mother, "O Mother, be patient. The torture of the Hereafter is far more severe than the torture of this life, and do not be reluctant, because you are right." At this the woman requested Pharaoh collect her bones and the bones of her children and bury them in the same grave. Pharaoh promised her that--then dropped her into that boiling water. She died as a martyr. The good odor the Prophet smelled coming from her grave is an indication of her high status. 4- During his trip, the Prophet saw people who were planting and reaping in two days. Jibril told the Prophet, "These were the people who fight for the sake of Allah (mujahidun). ")." 5- The Prophet also saw people whose lips and tongues were clipped with scissors made of fire. Jibril told the Prophet, "These are the speakers of sedition (fitna) who call people to misguidance." 6- He also saw a bull which exited a very small outlet, then was trying in vain to return through that small outlet. Jibril told the Prophet, "This is the example of the bad word--once spoken, it cannot be returned." 7- The Prophet saw people grazing like animals, with very little clothing on their private parts. Jibril told the Prophet, "These are the ones who refused to pay zakat. "." 8- The Prophet saw angels smashing some people's heads with rocks. These heads would return to the shape they had been, and then the angels would smash their heads again--and so on. Jibril told the Prophet, "These are the ones whose heads felt too heavy to perform prayer--the ones who used to sleep without praying." 9- On his journey the Prophet saw people who were competing to eat some rotten meat--ignoring meat that was sliced and unspoiled. Jibril told the Prophet, "These are people from your nation who leave out that which is permissible (halal), and consume that which is forbidden ((haram). "This reference was to the fornicators, that is, the ones who left out the permissible (marriage) and committed sins (fornication). 10- Also, the Prophet saw people who were drinking from the fluid coming from the bodies of the fornicators, (water mixed with blood). Jibril indicated to the Prophet these were the ones who were drinking the alcohol which is prohibited in this world. 11- The Prophet saw people scratching their faces and chests with brass finger nails. Jibril said, "These are the examples of those who commit gossip ((ghibah). ")." حوار شيق مع مسيحية؟ كيف ولد محمدﷺ..وتفاجئ د.ذاكر نايك؟ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1QwoceIR-8 لقرآن يحرض على العداوة مع اليهود كيف يكون كتاب سلام !؟ والجواب خطير جدا من د.ذاكر نايك TGM Tube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwbDiWzznMY صيني متعجب من تعدد الزوجات في الاسلام رد جميل ذاكر نايك مترجم بالعربي zakir naik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDC-6jR_Dto شاب يسأل لما لم يتغير لباس المرأة المسلمة مع مرور الزمن مقل بقية الديانات || رد عجيب د.ذاكر نايك https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zc0YymrWB1s
  24. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    Allah says in the Quran what means : {Glory be to Him Who made His servant to go on a night from the Sacred Mosque to the remote mosque of which We have blessed the precincts, so that We may show to him some of Our signs; surely He is the Hearing, the Seeing.} (Al-Israa' 17:1) There is no doubt that Al-Isra (the night journey) followed by Al-Miraj (the heavenly ascension) was one of the miracles in the life of our Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him). According to the most accepted view, it happened on the 27th of Rajab, the seventh month of the Hijri calendar, in the tenth year of Muhammad's prophethood. It is reported in Hadith literature, that the Messenger of Allah was carried from the Sacred Mosque in Makkah to the "Farthest Mosque" (Al-Masjid al-Aqsa) in Jerusalem on a creature called Al-Buraq in the company of the archangel Gabriel (peace be upon him). There he led a congregational prayer of the prophets of God. Then Gabriel took him to the heavens where he met the prophets Adam, John, Jesus, Idris, Aaron and Moses (peace be on them all). In the seventh heaven, he met Abraham (peace be on him). He was then brought to the Divine Presence. The details of this encounter are beautifully detailed in the beginning of surat An-Najm (52). Prayer: God-given Gift During this time, Allah ordered for his nation fifty daily Prayers. But on the Prophet's return, he was told by Prophet Moses (peace be on him) that his followers could not perform fifty Prayers. Thus, he went back and eventually it was reduced to five daily Prayers. After this, the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) returned to Makkah on the same night itself. Therefore, Muslims should be thankful to Allah for this gift. They should take care of it and never neglect it. It is the thing that allows the Muslim to communicate with the creator five times as day. Time and Space Are Not Bound for Allah One major lesson of that miraculous event, was that space and time which are bound by laws of nature for humans, are not so bound for Allah. On that night prophet Muhammad bridged time and space and this world, traveling to the heavens by Allah's will. I believe that for those who study philosophy the abstract as well as the symbolic implications of the event might be very stimulating indeed. The gap between the reality of this life and that of the life to come simply diminished. This is illustrated by the Prophet's encounter with other prophets who were long since dead as far as we normally think of it but who, in reality, live as beings in a different form somewhere else. The implications of the night journey cannot be overstated. The miraculous nature of the Prophet's journey established his divine-stated legitimacy as the seal of all prophets. Allah brought him to Him to show us his true worth in the sight of Allah. All religious traditions share the concept of miracles, that is, something that defies logic, nature, or the established constitution and course of things. We will limit our discussion to legitimate miracles from Allah, which are by definition the only true miracles. When the forces of disbelief are strong, typically the prophetic miracles that oppose them are stronger. Prophet Moses was given several miracles, which included his staff that turned into a massive snake and culminated in his parting of the Red Sea, as a divine response to the extreme infidelity of Pharaoh. Similarly, Prophet Jesus was given even the power to raise the dead, in order to establish his legitimacy before the Jews who would ultimately condemn him to death for blasphemy. Nevertheless, his miracles were undeniable by their nature, and it was only the obstinacy and arrogance of the people to whom he was sent that enabled them to deny him. Muhammad's night journey was obviously not easy for the pagan Makkans to believe. Nevertheless, the Prophet proved it logically by describing the approaching caravans that he overtook on his miraculous return. Thus, this particular prophetic miracle not only established the Prophet's eminence for Muslims as discussed above, but it also helped to prove his prophethood to the non-believers of his time. After all these matters took place with the Prophet, he returned to the city of Makkah. Some scholars said the Prophet's journey took about one-third of the night, i.e., his journey from Makkah to Jerusalem, then to the heavens and what is above them, and then back to Makkah The next day the Prophet told the people what happened to him the previous night. The blasphemers belied the Prophet and mocked him, saying, "We need a month to get there and back, and you are claiming to have done all this in one night?" They said to Abu Bakr, "Look at what your companion is saying. He says he went to Jerusalem and came back in one night." Abu Bakr told them, "If he said that, then he is truthful. I believe him concerning the news of the heavens--that an angel descends to him from the heavens. How could I not believe he went to Jerusalem and came back in a short period of time--when these are on earth?" At that, the Companion, Abu Bakr, was called "as-Siddiq"--because of how strongly he believed all what the Prophet said. The blasphemous people questioned the Prophet: "If you are truthful, then describe to us Masjid al-Aqsa and its surroundings." They asked this because they knew Prophet Muhammad had never been there before the previous night. Allah enabled the Messenger to see Masjid al-Aqsa, and he described the masjid and its surroundings in exact detail. Moreover, the Prophet said, "On my way back, I saw some of your shepherds grazing their animals in a particular location. They were searching for a camel they had lost." The Prophet continued by giving the description of the camel. When these shepherds came back, they told their people what happened to them--precisely as the Prophet had already told them. These blasphemers admitted the Prophet's description was exact. Despite that, They did accept Islam. Only those whom Allah willed to be guided, will be guided. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p97c4D2fTqw ISRA MI'RAJ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mylm0P9srLw Isra and Miraj (Night Journey) - Shaykh Hamza Yusuf يابانية تسأل كيف انتقل محمد من مكة الى القدس باليلة انها كذبة واضحه - اجابة ذاكر نايك https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxSalrgd1m4
  25. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    لماذا نعبد الله ونمجده وهو لا يحتاج لذلك؟ د ذاكر نايك Dr Zakir Naik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pdITBKqhs4 Ask the Sheikh" by Musa cerantonio ( Not Being Isolating ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpQkyih3fBA
  26. Luke_Wilbur

    The Didache (The Teaching) First Christian Catechism

    Spirits of the air that try to direct us. n Jewish mythology, a dybbuk (Yiddish: דיבוק‎, from the Hebrew verb דָּבַק‬ dāḇaq meaning "adhere" or "cling") is a malicious possessing spirit believed to be the dislocated soul of a dead person. It The Holy Spirit (Hebrew: ‬רוּחַ הַקֹּדֶשׁ‬, Modern ruach hakodesh, Tiberian ruaħ haqqodɛʃ) in Judaism, also termed "Divine Inspiration," Ibbur (Hebrew: עיבור‬, "pregnancy" or "impregnation" or "incubation"), is one of the transmigration forms of the soul and has similarities with Gilgul neshamot. Ibbur is always good or positive, while dybbuk (Yiddish: דיבוק‬‎), is negative. Ibbur is the most positive form of possession, and the most complicated. It happens when a righteous soul decides to occupy a living person's body for a time, and joins, or spiritually "impregnates" the existing soul. Ibbur is always temporary, and the living person may or may not know that it has taken place. Often the living person has graciously given consent for the Ibbur. The reason for Ibbur is always benevolent—the departed soul wishes to complete an important task, to fulfil a promise, or to perform a mitzvah (a religious duty) that can only be accomplished in the flesh. In Lurianic Kabbalah, ibbur occurs when an incomplete soul which cannot achieve tikun is completed by the addition of the soul of a tzadik,[1] or spiritual master. Luria believed this to be possible even whilst the possessor was still alive. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/gilgul
  27. eninn

    Actual reality?????

    Moses was probably born during the reign of Ramesses II. Biblical data. are therefore of considerable historical value in the story of Moses. A medical study of the mummy of Merneptah has yielded further useful information on the possible causes of this pharaoh’s death. The fact that we possess the mummy of this pharaoh is one of paramount importance. The Bible records that pharaoh was engulfed in the sea, but does not give any details as to what subsequently became of his corpse. The Qur’an, in chapter Yoonus, notes that the body of the pharaoh would be saved from the waters: “Today I will save your dead body so that you may be a sign for those who come after you.” Qur’an, 10:92 A medical examination of this mummy, has, shown that the body could not have stayed in the water for long, because it does not show signs of deterioration due to prolonged submersion. Here again, the comparison between the narration in the Qur’an and the data provided by modern knowledge does not give rise to the slightest objection from a scientific point of view. Such points of agreement are characteristic of the Qur’anic revelation. But, are we throwing the Judeo-Christian revelation into discredit and depriving it of all its intrinsic value by stressing the faults as seen from a scientific point of view? I think not because the criticism is not aimed at the text as a whole, but only at certain passages. There are parts of the Bible which have an undoubted historical value. I have shown that in my book, The Bible, The Qur’an and Science, where I discuss passages which enable us to locate Moses in time. The main causes which brought about such differences as arise from the comparison between the Holy Scriptures and modern knowledge is known to modern scholars. The Old Testament constitutes a collection of literary works produced in the course of roughly nine centuries and which has undergone many alterations. The part played by men in the actual composition of the texts of the Bible is quite considerable. The Qur’anic revelation, on the other hand, has a history which is radically different. As we have already seen, from the moment it was first commto humans, it was learnt by heart and written down during Muhammad’s own lifetime. It is thanks to this fact that the Qur’an does not pose any problem of authenticity. A totally objective examination of the Qur’an, in the light of modern knowledge, leads us to recognize the agreement between the two, as has already been noted on repeated occasions throughout this presentation. It makes us deem it quite unthinkable for a man of Muhammad’s time to have been the author of such statements, on account of the state of knowledge in his day. Such considerations are part of what gives the Qur’anic revelation its unique place among religious and non-religious texts, and forces the impartial scientist to admit his inability to provide an explanation based solely upon materialistic reasoning. Such facts as I have had the pleasure of exposing to you here, appear to represent a genuine challenge to human explanation leaving only one alternative: the Qur’an is undoubtedly a revelation from God. Scientific Miracles Of The Holy Quran - Preservation of pharaoh's body in the time of Moses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbggjYExIYE Musa (AS) and Firaun (Moses and Pharoah) - Nouman Ali Khan (Full Lecture) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgwdeGPAMx4
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